Twilight on the Prairie (1944)

62 mins | Western | 14 July 1944

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Song of the Plains . Jack Teagarden is listed twice in the cast credits, first with his character name, "Jackson," then as "Jack Teagarden and His ... More Less

The working title of this film was Song of the Plains . Jack Teagarden is listed twice in the cast credits, first with his character name, "Jackson," then as "Jack Teagarden and His Orchestra." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
10 Jun 1944.
---
Daily Variety
24 May 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Aug 44
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 44
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 May 44
p. 1899.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Jun 44
pp. 1921-22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
Dir of sd
[Sd] tech
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Blues," words and music by Jack Teagarden
"Don't You Ever Be a Cowboy," "Let's Love Again," "And Then" and "Where the Prairie Meets the Sky," words by Everett Carter, music by Milton Rosen
"I Get Mellow in the Yellow of the Moon," words and music by Jimmie Dodd
+
SONGS
"The Blues," words and music by Jack Teagarden
"Don't You Ever Be a Cowboy," "Let's Love Again," "And Then" and "Where the Prairie Meets the Sky," words by Everett Carter, music by Milton Rosen
"I Get Mellow in the Yellow of the Moon," words and music by Jimmie Dodd
"Salt Water Cowboy," words and music by Redd Evans
"No Letter Today," words and music by Frankie Brown
"Texas Polka," words and music by Oakley Haldeman, Vic Knight and Lew Porter
"Sip, Nip Song," words and music by Brenda Weisberg and Don George
"Sing Me a Song of the Prairie," words and music by Foy Willing
"Pig Foot Pete," words and music by Don Raye and Gene de Paul
"Little Brown Jug," words and music by Joseph E. Winner.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Song of the Plains
Release Date:
14 July 1944
Production Date:
late March--early April 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
14 June 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12742
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10115
SYNOPSIS

In the small town of Little Lip, Texas, several townsmen gather to listen to a radio broadcast of western singer Bucky Williams, his partner, Ginger Lee, and his band, the Buckaroos. At the end of the show, Bucky tells his listeners that next week, the band will be broadcasting from Mammoth Studios in Hollywood, where they will be appearing in a motion picture called Twilight on the Prairie . Later, onboard a plane bound for Hollywood, the band's manager, Jackson, coaches them on their western accent, which they have lost somewhat by living in New York City. Just then, a flight attendant explains that military officers, who have been in Little Lip examining a rich mine there, have commandeered the plane for a flight back to Washington, D.C. After the plane makes an emergency landing in Little Lip, the band searches for a hotel room, but all the rooms have been taken by prospectors drawn to town by news of the mine. When the band members overhear ranch hands from the Bar "B" ranch telling the owner, Cactus Barton, that they are quitting to work in the mine, they decide to offer themselves as replacements, in the hopes of gaining housing for the night. Planning to quit the next morning after breakfast, the band checks their instruments at the telegraph office in town, then heads out to the ranch. A short time later, a townsman named Jed wanders into the telegraph office, notices the band's name on the side of the bass drum, and tells the telegraph operator, Hank, that the band is in town. Hank immediately sends a note to a local news ... +


In the small town of Little Lip, Texas, several townsmen gather to listen to a radio broadcast of western singer Bucky Williams, his partner, Ginger Lee, and his band, the Buckaroos. At the end of the show, Bucky tells his listeners that next week, the band will be broadcasting from Mammoth Studios in Hollywood, where they will be appearing in a motion picture called Twilight on the Prairie . Later, onboard a plane bound for Hollywood, the band's manager, Jackson, coaches them on their western accent, which they have lost somewhat by living in New York City. Just then, a flight attendant explains that military officers, who have been in Little Lip examining a rich mine there, have commandeered the plane for a flight back to Washington, D.C. After the plane makes an emergency landing in Little Lip, the band searches for a hotel room, but all the rooms have been taken by prospectors drawn to town by news of the mine. When the band members overhear ranch hands from the Bar "B" ranch telling the owner, Cactus Barton, that they are quitting to work in the mine, they decide to offer themselves as replacements, in the hopes of gaining housing for the night. Planning to quit the next morning after breakfast, the band checks their instruments at the telegraph office in town, then heads out to the ranch. A short time later, a townsman named Jed wanders into the telegraph office, notices the band's name on the side of the bass drum, and tells the telegraph operator, Hank, that the band is in town. Hank immediately sends a note to a local news service, which broadcasts that the Buckaroos are working for the war effort by helping to bring in the harvest. Meanwhile, at the ranch, Cactus and his daughter Sally serve dinner to the band, after which Jed and Hank arrive with their instruments and reveal the group's identity. After the band agrees to sing a song, Bucky, who is rapidly falling in love with Sally, tries to convince her that their work at the ranch is not merely a publicity stunt. The next day, Bucky receives a call from the film's producer, Mr. Gainsworth, who also mistakes their stay at the ranch for a publicity stunt and proclaims it an act of genius. Gainsworth orders them to remain at the ranch until further notice, and over the next few days, the gang exasperates Cactus with their ineptitude around the farm. Finally, a plane arrives in Little Lip to transport the band to Hollywood, further convincing Sally that their stay was only a marketing ploy. The band begins work on the picture, but a lovestruck Bucky complains to Gainsworth about the stage settings and persuades him to move the production to the ranch for location shooting. The band's return to Little Lip pleases Cactus and Sally, who are paid for the use of their ranch and receive more help to complete the harvest. That evening, after Sally prepares a barbecue for the cast and crew, she and Bucky talk in the moonlight. When Cactus sees them, he becomes impatient for their romance to bloom and orders Bucky to kiss Sally, which Bucky gladly does. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.