Colonel Effingham's Raid (1946)

70 mins | Comedy-drama | February 1946

Director:

Irving Pichel

Writer:

Kathryn Scola

Producer:

Lamar Trotti

Cinematographer:

Edward Cronjager

Editor:

Harmon Jones

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Albert Hogsett

Production Company:

Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Rebel Yell and Everything's Peaches Down in Georgia . The picture's opening title cards read, "Twentieth Century-Fox presents Charles Coburn, Joan Bennett, William Eythe in Berry Fleming's Colonel Effingham's Raid ." According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, Margaret Prussing and Albert Shelby LeVino worked on a version of the screenplay, but their work was not incorporated into the finished picture. HR news items note that Monty Woolley and Mary Anderson were originally scheduled to star in the film, with producer Lamar Trotti briefly set as the director and screenwriter. In Apr 1943, a studio press release announced that John M. Stahl would direct the picture, and in Dec 1943, a publicity announcement included Clem Bevans in the cast.
       The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, also at UCLA, contain contracts indicating that Darby Jones was originally set to play "Ninety-Eight," Armand "Curly" Wright was to play "Jimmy Economy" and George Carleton was to play "Jessie Bibbs." None of those actors appeared in the released film, however. The CBCS erroneously lists actor Frank Mitchell (instead of Grant Mitchell) in the role of "Major Anthony T. Hickock." According to a Feb 1945 HR news item, production shut down for two weeks while Joan Bennett recovered from the flu. Although an 11 Jan 1945 HR news item stated that scenes featuring actor Edward Fielding, who died on 10 Jan 1945, would be reshot with another actor, Fielding does appear in the completed picture, which marked his ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Rebel Yell and Everything's Peaches Down in Georgia . The picture's opening title cards read, "Twentieth Century-Fox presents Charles Coburn, Joan Bennett, William Eythe in Berry Fleming's Colonel Effingham's Raid ." According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, Margaret Prussing and Albert Shelby LeVino worked on a version of the screenplay, but their work was not incorporated into the finished picture. HR news items note that Monty Woolley and Mary Anderson were originally scheduled to star in the film, with producer Lamar Trotti briefly set as the director and screenwriter. In Apr 1943, a studio press release announced that John M. Stahl would direct the picture, and in Dec 1943, a publicity announcement included Clem Bevans in the cast.
       The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, also at UCLA, contain contracts indicating that Darby Jones was originally set to play "Ninety-Eight," Armand "Curly" Wright was to play "Jimmy Economy" and George Carleton was to play "Jessie Bibbs." None of those actors appeared in the released film, however. The CBCS erroneously lists actor Frank Mitchell (instead of Grant Mitchell) in the role of "Major Anthony T. Hickock." According to a Feb 1945 HR news item, production shut down for two weeks while Joan Bennett recovered from the flu. Although an 11 Jan 1945 HR news item stated that scenes featuring actor Edward Fielding, who died on 10 Jan 1945, would be reshot with another actor, Fielding does appear in the completed picture, which marked his last screen appearance. According to a correspondence from Fleming, contained in the legal files, the story was inspired by "an incident that occurred in Augusta [GA] in Mar 1941 when the county commissioners...proposed to raze the Richmond county courthouse." On 3 Nov 1949, Coburn recreated his role for The Hallmark Playhouse radio broadcast of the story. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Oct 1945.
---
Daily Variety
28 Sep 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Oct 45
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 45
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 45
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 45
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 45
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 46
p. 5.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Jan 45
p. 2259.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Sep 45
p. 2661.
New York Times
5 Apr 46
p. 21.
Variety
3 Oct 45
p. 20.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Transparency projection shots
Transparency projection shots
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Research dir
Research asst
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Colonel Effingham's Raid by Berry Fleming (New York, 1943).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Rebel Yell
Berry Flemings Colonel Effinghams Raid
Everythings Peaches Down in Georgia
Release Date:
February 1946
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Atlanta, GA: 24 January 1946
Production Date:
early December 1944--early February 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
28 September 1945
Copyright Number:
LP115
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in feet):
6,360
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10702
SYNOPSIS

In April 1940, retired Army colonel William Seaborn Effingham returns to his hometown of Fredericksville, Georgia, after an absence of many years. Newspaper reporter Albert Marbury is pleased to become acquainted with his "cousin Willie," whom he has not seen since he was a small boy, and tells him that the polite society of Fredericksville retains its aversion to politics or causes of any kind. On Confederate Memorial Day, Al and his pal Dewey are loafing around the newspaper office when editor Earl Hoats arrives and complains that a rival paper is getting more advertisers because it supports the policies of the mayor and his cronies, including their plan to rename Confederate Monument Square after Pud Toolen, a deceased politician of dubious ethics. Hoats, a transplanted Northerner, insists on printing editorials in support of the mayor, despite the protests of Al, Dewey and society editor Ella Sue Dozier. One afternoon, Effingham comes to the office and offers to write a military commentary column, and Hoats reluctantly agrees. Effingham's column is a success and he is welcomed back into the town's old society circles, although some of his former chums, who are now prosperous businessmen, look down upon him for "lowering" himself by writing for the public. Later, Effingham learns about the plan to rename the town square and writes against it, thereby infuriating Hoats. Effingham persists, however, and suggests to the mayor that the square be beautified rather than renamed. The mayor and his cronies consider Effingham a crackpot, but decide to use his idea to cover up their own graft-laden scheme to tear down the courthouse and build a new one. ... +


In April 1940, retired Army colonel William Seaborn Effingham returns to his hometown of Fredericksville, Georgia, after an absence of many years. Newspaper reporter Albert Marbury is pleased to become acquainted with his "cousin Willie," whom he has not seen since he was a small boy, and tells him that the polite society of Fredericksville retains its aversion to politics or causes of any kind. On Confederate Memorial Day, Al and his pal Dewey are loafing around the newspaper office when editor Earl Hoats arrives and complains that a rival paper is getting more advertisers because it supports the policies of the mayor and his cronies, including their plan to rename Confederate Monument Square after Pud Toolen, a deceased politician of dubious ethics. Hoats, a transplanted Northerner, insists on printing editorials in support of the mayor, despite the protests of Al, Dewey and society editor Ella Sue Dozier. One afternoon, Effingham comes to the office and offers to write a military commentary column, and Hoats reluctantly agrees. Effingham's column is a success and he is welcomed back into the town's old society circles, although some of his former chums, who are now prosperous businessmen, look down upon him for "lowering" himself by writing for the public. Later, Effingham learns about the plan to rename the town square and writes against it, thereby infuriating Hoats. Effingham persists, however, and suggests to the mayor that the square be beautified rather than renamed. The mayor and his cronies consider Effingham a crackpot, but decide to use his idea to cover up their own graft-laden scheme to tear down the courthouse and build a new one. Effingham is outraged when the mayor reveals his plan and vows to save the historic building, although an indifferent Al declares that the old structure should go. Effingham asks a friend, retired Army engineer Major Anthony T. Hickock, to inspect the courthouse, and he confirms that it should be restored. Determined to slip the plan past the town citizens, as he has already signed a construction contract with his brother-in-law, Bill Silk, the mayor holds a town meeting, which he believes no one will attend. Effingham has written about the meeting, however, and the packed hall is filled with people opposed to the mayor's plan. Undaunted, the mayor misleads the people into thinking that the federal government will only give them a grant if the courthouse is completely rebuilt rather than restored, and that it will cost the taxpayers too much money to preserve the building. Effingham investigates and learns that the mayor lied, but Al tells him that it is useless to fight the politicians. When the mayor declines to hold another public meeting on the issue, Effingham goes to three of the most influential men in town to ask for their help. The men, who Effingham had believed were his friends, tell him that he is unrealistic and that they cannot get involved in such matters. Disillusioned, Effingham gives up his fight and his health begins to fail. Al, who has joined the National Guard to impress Ella Sue, is about to leave on active duty, and when he goes to say goodbye to Effingham, he is astonished by his cousin's decline. Finally realizing that the idealistic old man has been right all along, Al organizes the other soldiers and demands that the mayor and town council restore the old courthouse and leave Monument Square as it is. The mayor promises to follow their wishes, and Al is rewarded with a kiss from Ella Sue. Effingham's will to live is restored by Al's actions, and while his friends apologize for letting him down, the proud old soldier salutes Al as he marches off with his men. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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