Duffy's Tavern (1945)

97 mins | Musical comedy | 28 September 1945

Director:

Hal Walker

Cinematographer:

Lionel Lindon

Editor:

Arthur Schmidt

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, William Flannery

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The title card on the viewed print reads "Ed Gardner's Duffy's Tavern ," which was also the film's working title. Gardner's onscreen credit reads "and Archie (Himself) Ed Gardner." Duffy's Tavern was one of the most popular radio comedy series of the 1940s. The fictional tavern was a cheap diner on New York City's Third Avenue. Celebrity guests "dropped in" the tavern each week, where they were lampooned by Ed Gardner, playing "Archie," the Brooklyn barkeep, who was renowned for his malapropisms. The show also featured Eddie Green as the waiter; Shirley Booth (who was married to Gardner from 1929 to 1942) as "Miss Duffy," the daughter of the tavern's proprietor, who himself was never heard, but frequently telephoned Archie; and Charlie Cantor as "Clifton Finnegan," a dim-witted customer.
       Gardner first appeared as Archie in 1939 on This Is New York . Duffy's Tavern first aired as part of the CBS audition series Forecast on 29 Jul 1940, and was so successful that it became its own show on CBS on 1 Mar 1941. The last Duffy's Tavern show was broadcast in the 1950-51 NBC season. The film included a parody with new lyrics of the Oscar-award winning song "Swinging on a Star" from Paramount's 1944 hit film Going My Way (see below). This film marked the first time Bing Crosby appeared in a film with his four sons, Gary, twins Phillip and Dennis and Lin. In one notable bit in the film, a drunken O'Malley and Archie try to find out if the light inside a refrigerator goes off when you close the door ... More Less

The title card on the viewed print reads "Ed Gardner's Duffy's Tavern ," which was also the film's working title. Gardner's onscreen credit reads "and Archie (Himself) Ed Gardner." Duffy's Tavern was one of the most popular radio comedy series of the 1940s. The fictional tavern was a cheap diner on New York City's Third Avenue. Celebrity guests "dropped in" the tavern each week, where they were lampooned by Ed Gardner, playing "Archie," the Brooklyn barkeep, who was renowned for his malapropisms. The show also featured Eddie Green as the waiter; Shirley Booth (who was married to Gardner from 1929 to 1942) as "Miss Duffy," the daughter of the tavern's proprietor, who himself was never heard, but frequently telephoned Archie; and Charlie Cantor as "Clifton Finnegan," a dim-witted customer.
       Gardner first appeared as Archie in 1939 on This Is New York . Duffy's Tavern first aired as part of the CBS audition series Forecast on 29 Jul 1940, and was so successful that it became its own show on CBS on 1 Mar 1941. The last Duffy's Tavern show was broadcast in the 1950-51 NBC season. The film included a parody with new lyrics of the Oscar-award winning song "Swinging on a Star" from Paramount's 1944 hit film Going My Way (see below). This film marked the first time Bing Crosby appeared in a film with his four sons, Gary, twins Phillip and Dennis and Lin. In one notable bit in the film, a drunken O'Malley and Archie try to find out if the light inside a refrigerator goes off when you close the door by climbing inside the icebox to investigate. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Aug 1945.
---
Daily Variety
17 Aug 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Aug 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 44
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 44
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 45
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Dec 44
p. 2230.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Aug 45
p. 2609.
New York Times
6 Sep 45
p. 23.
Variety
22 Aug 45
p. 20.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Billy DeWolfe
Robert Watson
Phillip Crosby
Lin Crosby
Addl guest stars:
Fred Steele
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Sketches
Sketches
Sketches
Sketches
Sketches
Sketches
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Ed supv
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss Lamour's and Miss Hutton's gowns
MUSIC
Vocal arr
Mus assoc
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Asst spec photog eff
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Matte paintings and miniatures
Asst matte paintings
Asst matte paintings (cam)
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the radio series Duffy's Tavern created by Ed Gardner (1 Mar 1941--1959).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" by Ernest R. Ball.
SONGS
"Swinging on a Star" and "The Hard Way," music by James Van Heusen, lyrics by Johnny Burke
"You Can't Blame a Gal for Tryin'," by Bernie Wayne and Ben Raleigh.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Ed Gardner's Duffy's Tavern
Release Date:
28 September 1945
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 5 September 1945
Los Angeles opening: 13 September 1945
Production Date:
25 September--mid December 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 August 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13518
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
97
Length(in feet):
8,928
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10463
SYNOPSIS

Archie, the manager of Duffy's Tavern in New York--"where the elite meet to eat"--has been sending Mr. Duffy into debt by secretly serving meals to unemployed veterans. Before they joined the service, the men had worked in P. J. O'Malley's National Phonographic Record Company, but when the factory closed because of a wartime shortage of shellac, which must be shipped from India, they lost their jobs. Concerned about the business, Duffy sends his daughter to look at the books, but Archie appeals to her patriotism and interest in men and continues to feed the veterans. Soldier Danny Murphy, meanwhile, returns to town and becomes determined to put the men back to work. Archie, who is convinced of his personal "maggotism" with the ladies, is planning to propose to O'Malley's daughter Peggy. On the night Archie is to propose, however, Peggy meets Danny in the factory, and while they are dancing alone to a Bing Crosby master album, they fall in love. While Archie waits for Peggy at her home, he and O'Malley get drunk together. Peggy, meanwhile, assures Danny that the bank approved a loan to her father to get the factory running again, unaware that her father showed her only part of his bank telegram. The next day, Duffy sends an accountant to go through the tavern's books, and he finds Duffy $1,200 short. Danny locates some shellac, but O'Malley shows him the bank telegram denying him a loan. After Peggy, who works as a switchboard operator at a swank hotel, learns that a group of motion picture celebrities is staying at the hotel, Archie decides to host a block party ... +


Archie, the manager of Duffy's Tavern in New York--"where the elite meet to eat"--has been sending Mr. Duffy into debt by secretly serving meals to unemployed veterans. Before they joined the service, the men had worked in P. J. O'Malley's National Phonographic Record Company, but when the factory closed because of a wartime shortage of shellac, which must be shipped from India, they lost their jobs. Concerned about the business, Duffy sends his daughter to look at the books, but Archie appeals to her patriotism and interest in men and continues to feed the veterans. Soldier Danny Murphy, meanwhile, returns to town and becomes determined to put the men back to work. Archie, who is convinced of his personal "maggotism" with the ladies, is planning to propose to O'Malley's daughter Peggy. On the night Archie is to propose, however, Peggy meets Danny in the factory, and while they are dancing alone to a Bing Crosby master album, they fall in love. While Archie waits for Peggy at her home, he and O'Malley get drunk together. Peggy, meanwhile, assures Danny that the bank approved a loan to her father to get the factory running again, unaware that her father showed her only part of his bank telegram. The next day, Duffy sends an accountant to go through the tavern's books, and he finds Duffy $1,200 short. Danny locates some shellac, but O'Malley shows him the bank telegram denying him a loan. After Peggy, who works as a switchboard operator at a swank hotel, learns that a group of motion picture celebrities is staying at the hotel, Archie decides to host a block party featuring entertainment by them. Archie and O'Malley sneak into the stars' suites disguised as painters, but, when they finally reach Betty Hutton, posing as her masseurs, they are caught. Peggy, however, arrives in time to convince Betty that they need her help. The benefit is an immense success, but before the final curtain, Duffy tries to have Archie arrested. A record distributor offers O'Malley a $1,200 advance, but the men must then press 1,500 records by the end of the night. They succeed, and Miss Duffy accepts the distributor's check and sees that the charges against Archie are dropped. Archie later tells Duffy that he is retiring because of his personal "maggotism" with Betty Hutton. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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