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HISTORY

Eleanore Griffin's original story, which was titled "Crocus Hill," was purchased by Harry Sherman in 1943 for a United Artists release, according to a FD news item. Sherman sold the rights to Twentieth Century-Fox in Sep 1943. HR news items reveal the following about the production: Actors considered for the role of "Tony Angelo" included Brian Donlevy, Michael O'Shea, James Cagney and Fred MacMurray, and actresses considered for a leading role included Merle Oberon and Lynn Bari. Gregory Ratoff was originally set to direct the picture, and in late Apr 1944, he was scheduled to travel to New York to test theater actress Nancy Nugent for a part. HR news items and studio press releases include the following actors and dancers in the film, although their participation in the completed picture has not been confirmed: Chester Conklin, Neal Hart, Jack Richardson, John Ince, Pat R. McGee, Elinor Troy, Carol Hartsook, Bess Flowers, John Merkyl, Dorothy Costello, Ruth Costello, Fred Steele, Red Shellac, Valerie Traxler, Evelyn Eager, and The Troupers, a dance group consisting of Jimmy Cross, Les Clark, Merrill Long and Jack Barnett. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection and Records of the Legal Department, both located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, Henry Morgan was signed to play a character named "Goofy Gus," but that role does not appear in the completed film. Studio records and other contemporary sources also note that famed comedy team Joe Smith and Charlie Dale were scheduled to perform their well-known "Dr. Cronkhite" skit, with Veda Ann Borg performing as a nurse. Although Smith and Dale ... More Less

Eleanore Griffin's original story, which was titled "Crocus Hill," was purchased by Harry Sherman in 1943 for a United Artists release, according to a FD news item. Sherman sold the rights to Twentieth Century-Fox in Sep 1943. HR news items reveal the following about the production: Actors considered for the role of "Tony Angelo" included Brian Donlevy, Michael O'Shea, James Cagney and Fred MacMurray, and actresses considered for a leading role included Merle Oberon and Lynn Bari. Gregory Ratoff was originally set to direct the picture, and in late Apr 1944, he was scheduled to travel to New York to test theater actress Nancy Nugent for a part. HR news items and studio press releases include the following actors and dancers in the film, although their participation in the completed picture has not been confirmed: Chester Conklin, Neal Hart, Jack Richardson, John Ince, Pat R. McGee, Elinor Troy, Carol Hartsook, Bess Flowers, John Merkyl, Dorothy Costello, Ruth Costello, Fred Steele, Red Shellac, Valerie Traxler, Evelyn Eager, and The Troupers, a dance group consisting of Jimmy Cross, Les Clark, Merrill Long and Jack Barnett. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection and Records of the Legal Department, both located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, Henry Morgan was signed to play a character named "Goofy Gus," but that role does not appear in the completed film. Studio records and other contemporary sources also note that famed comedy team Joe Smith and Charlie Dale were scheduled to perform their well-known "Dr. Cronkhite" skit, with Veda Ann Borg performing as a nurse. Although Smith and Dale are in the picture, neither the skit nor Borg appears in the released film. Another skit, the "Hungarian Rhapsody," which was to feature the team and actors George E. Stone and George McKay, also was eliminated. Studio records reveal that the film's opening, during which singers and saloons on a Barbary Coast street are shown, is the same footage used to open the 1943 Twentieth Century-Fox film Hello Frisco, Hello (see above). The legal files also note that William Rankin, the ex-husband of writer Eleanore Griffin, filed suit claiming that Griffin had plagiarized "Crocus Hill" from a story written by him. Rankin's attempt to obtain an injunction to prevent Twentieth Century-Fox from making the film was unsuccessful, although the disposition of his suit against Griffin and Harry Sherman is not known. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Jun 1945.
---
Daily Variety
29 May 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Mar 43
p. 7.
Film Daily
29 May 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Apr 44
p. 1, 15
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 May 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 44
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Aug 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Dec 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 45
p. 8.
Los Angeles Examiner
14 Jul 1945.
---
Motion Picture Daily
29 May 1945.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
7 Oct 44
p. 2131.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Jun 45
p. 2477.
New York Times
4 Jul 45
p. 10.
Variety
30 May 45
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
At the Piano
Joseph J. Greene
Frank McCown
Brooks Hunt
William Hunter
Jane Hazard
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
From a story by
Chinese translations
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Mus settings des by
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Incidental mus
Orch arr
Mus coordinator
SOUND
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Research dir
Research asst
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Walked In (With My Eyes Wide Open)," "I Don't Care Who Knows It" and "Touring San Francisco," music by Jimmy McHugh, lyrics by Harold Adamson
"Holy God, We Praise Thy Name," music and lyrics by Peter Ritter
"San Francisco," music by Bronislaw Kaper and Walter Jurmann, lyrics by Gus Kahn
+
SONGS
"I Walked In (With My Eyes Wide Open)," "I Don't Care Who Knows It" and "Touring San Francisco," music by Jimmy McHugh, lyrics by Harold Adamson
"Holy God, We Praise Thy Name," music and lyrics by Peter Ritter
"San Francisco," music by Bronislaw Kaper and Walter Jurmann, lyrics by Gus Kahn
"On San Francisco Bay," music by Gertrude Hoffman, lyrics by Vincent P. Bryan
"Hello, Frisco, Hello," music by Louis A. Hirsch, lyrics by Gene Buck
"When You Wore a Tulip and I Wore a Big Red Rose," music by Percy Wenrich, lyrics by Jack Mahoney
"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling," music by Ernest R. Ball, lyrics by Chauncey Olcott and George Graff, Jr.
"Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral, That's an Irish Lullaby," music and lyrics by J. R. Shannon
"Happy Birthday to You," music by Mildred J. Hill, lyrics by Patty Smith Hill
"Hello! Ma Baby," music and lyrics by Joseph E. Howard and Ida Emerson
"San Francisco, the Paris of the U.S.A.," music and lyrics by Hirshel Hendler
"What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at Me For," music and lyrics by Joseph McCarthy, Howard Johnson and James V. Monaco
"For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," traditional.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
July 1945
Premiere Information:
San Francisco opening: 13 June 1944
Los Angeles opening: 13 July 1945
Production Date:
31 July--late September 1944
retakes 22 December--27 December 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
13 June 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13449
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
95
Length(in feet):
8,922
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In turn of the century San Francisco, Tony Angelo runs the Barbary Coast's most successful saloon, which features his sweetheart, singer Sally Templeton. One night, Tony is enjoying his duties as host when a young girl named Katie Flanagan arrives and asks for her uncle Pete. Katie, who has just gotten off a boat from Ireland, is devastated when Sally and Tony inform her that her uncle is dead, and becomes even more despondent when Tony decides to send her back to Ireland on the next boat. Upon hearing that Katie has no family left, Sally insists that she at least be allowed to stay the night. Tony acquiesces, and soon after, Katie's earnest charm wins his affections and convinces him to allow her to stay for a few months while the boat first journeys to Seattle. Katie happily settles into life at the Gold Coast, Tony's saloon, although she insists that Tony take her to church. Knowing that Katie is expecting a proper Catholic church, Sally instructs Tony to take her to the fancy church on Nob Hill. Although Katie is awed with its magnificent houses, Tony tries to explain to her that the snobbish Nob Hill residents do not mix with their kind. His words are disproven, however, by the friendliness of Harriet Carruthers, the beautiful socialite who made Katie's acquaintance on the boat. When Harriet brings her brother Lash, who is running for district attorney, to the Gold Coast, Sally grows uneasy about Harriet's attentions to Tony. Sally's fears deepen after Tony and Katie dine at Harriet's mansion and Katie tells Sally that Tony kissed Harriet. Tony brushes ... +


In turn of the century San Francisco, Tony Angelo runs the Barbary Coast's most successful saloon, which features his sweetheart, singer Sally Templeton. One night, Tony is enjoying his duties as host when a young girl named Katie Flanagan arrives and asks for her uncle Pete. Katie, who has just gotten off a boat from Ireland, is devastated when Sally and Tony inform her that her uncle is dead, and becomes even more despondent when Tony decides to send her back to Ireland on the next boat. Upon hearing that Katie has no family left, Sally insists that she at least be allowed to stay the night. Tony acquiesces, and soon after, Katie's earnest charm wins his affections and convinces him to allow her to stay for a few months while the boat first journeys to Seattle. Katie happily settles into life at the Gold Coast, Tony's saloon, although she insists that Tony take her to church. Knowing that Katie is expecting a proper Catholic church, Sally instructs Tony to take her to the fancy church on Nob Hill. Although Katie is awed with its magnificent houses, Tony tries to explain to her that the snobbish Nob Hill residents do not mix with their kind. His words are disproven, however, by the friendliness of Harriet Carruthers, the beautiful socialite who made Katie's acquaintance on the boat. When Harriet brings her brother Lash, who is running for district attorney, to the Gold Coast, Sally grows uneasy about Harriet's attentions to Tony. Sally's fears deepen after Tony and Katie dine at Harriet's mansion and Katie tells Sally that Tony kissed Harriet. Tony brushes aside Sally's jealousy and announces that he is backing Lash in his election bid, despite the worries of his fellow saloon owners, who fear that Lash will close them down. Although Katie loves Sally, she approves of Tony's growing infatuation with Harriet, for she wants to live on Nob Hill. Harriet's overt flirtations drive Sally to work in another saloon, and Tony conceals the truth about her disappearance from Katie. Tony campaigns hard for Lash, and on the night Lash is elected, goes to the Carruthers mansion to celebrate. Tony's hopes for a life with Harriet are crushed, however, when Lash offers him a large sum of money for his help and Harriet states that while she is fond of him, their worlds will never mix. Dejected, Tony returns to the Gold Coast, where his former friends tell him that they will organize a boycott against him for his part in Lash's election. Tony sinks into a drunken despair and the saloon is soon closed. Katie tries to reach Sally, who refuses to listen to her, and in desperation, the child alerts Harriet about Tony's woes. Harriet then tells Sally that Tony needs her and warns her that if Sally does not return, she will forget her Nob Hill pride and stand by him herself. While Katie is gone, Tony's friends return and tell him that Lash has publicly acknowledged his help and vowed to close down only the corrupt parts of the Barbary Coast. Sally also returns and celebrates with Tony, but when the reunited couple goes up to Katie's bedroom to thank her for her interference, they discover that she has run away. Tony alerts the police, who begin a search that forces Katie into a scary adventure in Chinatown. When it seems that Katie has disappeared completely, Tony realizes that she must be at the vacant lot next to Harriet's house. He goes there with Sally, and they promise the overjoyed Katie that they will be a family forever. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.