Those Endearing Young Charms (1945)

81 or 86 mins | Romance | 1945

Director:

Lewis Allen

Writer:

Jerome Chodorov

Producer:

Bert Granet

Cinematographer:

Ted Tetzlaff

Editor:

Roland Gross

Production Designers:

Albert D'Agostino, Walter E. Keller

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to pre-production news items in HR , Samuel Goldwyn bought the rights to the Edward Chodorov play for $75,000, intending to star Teresa Wright and Dana Andrews in the motion picture version. Joan Fontaine was later assigned to play the female lead, but in Sep 1944, Goldwyn sold the property to RKO as a vehicle for Laraine Day. A Nov 1944 pre-production news item in HR announced Jacques Tourneur as the film's director. Two days later, however, another news item in HR announced that RKO was borrowing Lewis Allen from Paramount to direct the picture. The studio also borrowed Robert Young from M-G-M to star in the production.
       According to a news item in HR , the positive audience reaction to newcomer Bill Williams, whose onscreen credit reads: "And introducing Bill Williams as Jerry," won him a top role in the 1946 RKO film Deadline at Dawn (See Entry). Screenwriter Jerome Chodorov was the brother of playwright Edward ... More Less

According to pre-production news items in HR , Samuel Goldwyn bought the rights to the Edward Chodorov play for $75,000, intending to star Teresa Wright and Dana Andrews in the motion picture version. Joan Fontaine was later assigned to play the female lead, but in Sep 1944, Goldwyn sold the property to RKO as a vehicle for Laraine Day. A Nov 1944 pre-production news item in HR announced Jacques Tourneur as the film's director. Two days later, however, another news item in HR announced that RKO was borrowing Lewis Allen from Paramount to direct the picture. The studio also borrowed Robert Young from M-G-M to star in the production.
       According to a news item in HR , the positive audience reaction to newcomer Bill Williams, whose onscreen credit reads: "And introducing Bill Williams as Jerry," won him a top role in the 1946 RKO film Deadline at Dawn (See Entry). Screenwriter Jerome Chodorov was the brother of playwright Edward Chodorov. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Apr 1945.
---
Daily Variety
17 Apr 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Apr 45
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 43
p, 5
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 44
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Nov 44
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jan 45
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 45
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 45
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 45
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
10 Feb 45
p. 2310.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Apr 45
p. 2413.
New York Times
20 Jun 45
p. 26.
Variety
20 Jun 45
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Those Endearing Young Charms by Edward Chodorov (New York, 16 Jun 1943).
SONGS
"Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms," words by Thomas Moore, music traditional.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 19 June 1945
Production Date:
early January--mid February 1945
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
3 June 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13347
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
81 or 86
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10082
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Helen Brandt and her mother have moved from their small town of Ellsworth Falls to New York City, where Helen is employed as a perfume clerk at a department store and Mrs. Brandt works for the war relief effort. Jerry, a home town boy who has just returned from serving in France, is trying to woo Helen, but she only thinks of him as a "pal." While eating at a café one day, Jerry meets his college buddy, Lieutenant Hank Travers, a pilot in the Air Force, and begins to rhapsodize about Helen. Hank, a cynical philanderer, is intrigued by Jerry's description and insists upon accompanying him on his date with Helen that night. To monopolize Helen's time, Hank invites Mrs. Brandt to join them dancing and she accepts. At the club, Mrs. Brandt begins crying when the band plays the song "Those Endearing Young Charms," and Helen realizes that her mother is crying for her long-lost love, Jerry's father. After taking Helen and Mrs. Brandt home that night, Hank waits for Mrs. Brandt to retire, then tries to romance Helen. Although she is attracted to Hank, Helen realizes that he is not serious about her and asks him to leave. The next day at work, however, Helen is distracted by thoughts of Hank, and when he leaves a message for her to phone him later that night, she eagerly returns his call. When Mrs. Brandt warns her daughter that Hank is dishonorable, Helen reminds her that she lost Jerry's father because she was afraid to pursue him. The next day, Hank convinces Helen's supervisor to give her ... +


Helen Brandt and her mother have moved from their small town of Ellsworth Falls to New York City, where Helen is employed as a perfume clerk at a department store and Mrs. Brandt works for the war relief effort. Jerry, a home town boy who has just returned from serving in France, is trying to woo Helen, but she only thinks of him as a "pal." While eating at a café one day, Jerry meets his college buddy, Lieutenant Hank Travers, a pilot in the Air Force, and begins to rhapsodize about Helen. Hank, a cynical philanderer, is intrigued by Jerry's description and insists upon accompanying him on his date with Helen that night. To monopolize Helen's time, Hank invites Mrs. Brandt to join them dancing and she accepts. At the club, Mrs. Brandt begins crying when the band plays the song "Those Endearing Young Charms," and Helen realizes that her mother is crying for her long-lost love, Jerry's father. After taking Helen and Mrs. Brandt home that night, Hank waits for Mrs. Brandt to retire, then tries to romance Helen. Although she is attracted to Hank, Helen realizes that he is not serious about her and asks him to leave. The next day at work, however, Helen is distracted by thoughts of Hank, and when he leaves a message for her to phone him later that night, she eagerly returns his call. When Mrs. Brandt warns her daughter that Hank is dishonorable, Helen reminds her that she lost Jerry's father because she was afraid to pursue him. The next day, Hank convinces Helen's supervisor to give her the day off and drives Helen to the army airfield. There, Hank learns that he has a two-day reprieve before leaving for the front, but to put pressure on Helen, he tells her that he is leaving right away and bids her farewell. That night, Helen returns home distraught and tells her mother that she is in love with Hank. Soon after, Hank calls to inform Helen that his mission has been fogged in, and Helen agrees to meet him at the club. From the club, Hank drives Helen to the seashore, where her loving endearments force him to admit that he lied about leaving in order to manipulate her into falling in love with him. Dejected, Helen returns home and Hank goes back to his hotel room, where he learns that his leave has been canceled. Realizing that he is in love with Helen, Hank rushes to her apartment to beg her forgiveness, but Helen orders him to leave. Recognizing Hank's sincerity, Mrs. Brandt urges Helen to go after him, and as they embrace on the airstrip, minutes before Hank is to take off, Helen promises to wait for him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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