Till the End of Time (1946)

105 mins | Drama | 1 August 1946

Director:

Edward Dmytryk

Writer:

Allen Rivkin

Cinematographer:

Harry Wild

Editor:

Harry Gerstad

Production Designers:

Albert D'Agostino, Jack Okey

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were They Dream of Home and The Dream of Home . Modern sources note that all of the main characters in Niven Busch's novel were either American Indian or black, and that the only racial incident of the book to be retained in the film was the final bar scene. HR news items and RKO production files from the UCLA Arts Library--Special Collection add the following information about the production: In May 1945, producer Dore Schary received script approval from two Marine generals assigned to the project. The picture began as a Vanguard Films production, but was taken over by RKO in Jul 1945 along with Notorious and The Spiral Staircase (see above entries). Shirley Temple and Don DeFore were considered for leading roles in the film, and John Lund was tested with Guy Madison for a "top role," but was not cast. Also tested for parts were Chris Drake and twenty-six other "recently discharged servicemen," but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Sam Levene was announced as a cast member, but he was not in the viewed print and his participation in the final film is doubtful. RKO borrowed Johnny Sands, who made his screen debut in the picture, Dorothy McGuire and Guy Madison from David Selznick's company. Steve Dunhill, Howard Negley and Deborah Allen, who was publicized as a recent high school graduate and beauty contest winner, were announced as cast members, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Some scenes for the production were shot ... More Less

The working titles of this film were They Dream of Home and The Dream of Home . Modern sources note that all of the main characters in Niven Busch's novel were either American Indian or black, and that the only racial incident of the book to be retained in the film was the final bar scene. HR news items and RKO production files from the UCLA Arts Library--Special Collection add the following information about the production: In May 1945, producer Dore Schary received script approval from two Marine generals assigned to the project. The picture began as a Vanguard Films production, but was taken over by RKO in Jul 1945 along with Notorious and The Spiral Staircase (see above entries). Shirley Temple and Don DeFore were considered for leading roles in the film, and John Lund was tested with Guy Madison for a "top role," but was not cast. Also tested for parts were Chris Drake and twenty-six other "recently discharged servicemen," but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Sam Levene was announced as a cast member, but he was not in the viewed print and his participation in the final film is doubtful. RKO borrowed Johnny Sands, who made his screen debut in the picture, Dorothy McGuire and Guy Madison from David Selznick's company. Steve Dunhill, Howard Negley and Deborah Allen, who was publicized as a recent high school graduate and beauty contest winner, were announced as cast members, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Some scenes for the production were shot at the San Diego Marine Base, in Beverly Hills and Sawtelle, CA (now a part of West Los Angeles), the Westwood Ice Gardens, and at Vermont Avenue and 4th Street and the Packard-Bell plant on Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles. RKO purchased the film rights to the title and title song for $15,000. Robert Mitchum reprised his role in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 6 Jan 1947, co-starring Laraine Day and Bill Williams. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Jun 1946.
---
Daily Variety
12 Jun 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Jun 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 45
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 45
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 45
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 45
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Oct 45
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 45
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 45
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 46
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 46
p. 3, 5
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 46
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Jun 46
p. 3041.
New York Times
24 Jul 46
p. 24.
Variety
12 Jun 46
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
By arrangement with David O. Selznick
By arrangement with David O. Selznick
John S. Roberts
Drew Allen
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Dore Schary Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss McGuire's clothes des by
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Opt eff
Transparency projection shots
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod asst
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel They Dream of Home by Niven Busch (New York, 1944).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Till the End of Time," words and music by Buddy Kaye and Ted Mossman, based on Polonaise in A Flat Major by Frédéric Chopin.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Dream of Home
They Dream of Home
Release Date:
1 August 1946
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 23 July 1946
Production Date:
15 October 1945--22 January 1946
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
Copyright Date:
23 July 1946
Copyright Number:
LP559
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
105
Length(in feet):
9,441
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11260
SYNOPSIS

After he is discharged from the Marines, twenty-one-year-old Cliff Harper returns to his home in Los Angeles. At his parents' empty house, Cliff meets his new neighbor, Helen Ingersoll, a vivacious college freshman, who is immediately starstuck by the decorated hero. Anxious to be with friends, Cliff heads for Scuffy's, his favorite pre-war soda shop. At Scuffy's, which has been transformed to a bar, friend and fellow ex-serviceman Pinky introduces Cliff to Pat Ruscomb, and instantly attracted to her, Cliff asks her to dance. In a romantic daze, Cliff abandons Pinky, goes to Pat's apartment and kisses her impetuously. When he professes his passion, however, Pat withdraws from him and talks about her husband, who was killed during the war. Depressed by Pat's mourning, Cliff returns home and is greeted ecstatically by his parents. That night, the Harpers host a barbecue, and Cliff is subjected to a variety of questions about the war. At odds with the prevailing mood of the party, Cliff tries to call Pat, who is out, then cries himself to sleep. The next day, Pinky invites Cliff to go ice skating with him and Pat, and Cliff asks an eager Helen to be his date. In the skating rink café, Cliff and Pat see a lonely soldier shaking from post-traumatic stress disorder and approach him. Cliff commiserates with the veteran, while Pat talks about her own painful past to give him courage. The next morning, Cliff is questioned by his father about his future plans and disappoints him by answering that he is unsure about what he wants to do with his life. Cliff then ... +


After he is discharged from the Marines, twenty-one-year-old Cliff Harper returns to his home in Los Angeles. At his parents' empty house, Cliff meets his new neighbor, Helen Ingersoll, a vivacious college freshman, who is immediately starstuck by the decorated hero. Anxious to be with friends, Cliff heads for Scuffy's, his favorite pre-war soda shop. At Scuffy's, which has been transformed to a bar, friend and fellow ex-serviceman Pinky introduces Cliff to Pat Ruscomb, and instantly attracted to her, Cliff asks her to dance. In a romantic daze, Cliff abandons Pinky, goes to Pat's apartment and kisses her impetuously. When he professes his passion, however, Pat withdraws from him and talks about her husband, who was killed during the war. Depressed by Pat's mourning, Cliff returns home and is greeted ecstatically by his parents. That night, the Harpers host a barbecue, and Cliff is subjected to a variety of questions about the war. At odds with the prevailing mood of the party, Cliff tries to call Pat, who is out, then cries himself to sleep. The next day, Pinky invites Cliff to go ice skating with him and Pat, and Cliff asks an eager Helen to be his date. In the skating rink café, Cliff and Pat see a lonely soldier shaking from post-traumatic stress disorder and approach him. Cliff commiserates with the veteran, while Pat talks about her own painful past to give him courage. The next morning, Cliff is questioned by his father about his future plans and disappoints him by answering that he is unsure about what he wants to do with his life. Cliff then goes with Helen and platoon mate William Tabeshaw, who has just arrived from New Mexico, where he works as a cowboy, to see Perry Kincheloe, a fellow veteran and former boxer. Though happy to see Cliff and Bill, who has a metal plate in his skull from a war injury, the legless Perry rejects their attempt to cheer him up and politely rejects the advice of Sergeant Gunny Watrous, his discharge officer, to wear his artificial legs. Later, Cliff sees Pat drinking with an army captain at Scuffy's and then fights with his parents, who accuse him of behaving like a stranger. Unhappy and jealous, Cliff passes up the lovesick Helen and waits for Pat's return outside her apartment. After he spies Pat drunkenly kiss the captain goodnight, he calls her a tramp and leaves in a jealous huff. Once calm, Cliff returns to apologize to Pat, who reveals that she went out with the captain only because he was her husband's co-pilot. Ashamed, Cliff comforts Pat and admits that he, too, is lonely and confused. At Pat's suggestion, Cliff then takes an inspection job at the radio factory where she works as a secretary, but soon picks a fight with his supervisor. After another discouraging visit with Perry, Cliff proposes to Pat, but she rejects him for not taking charge of his life. Angry, Cliff goes drinking with Bill, who reveals that he lost his job as a cowhand in New Mexico after the metal plate in his skull began causing him unbearable pain. Concerned about Bill, who refuses to see a doctor, Cliff telephones Perry on the pretext of asking him to invest in a ranch deal that Bill has proposed. By the time that Perry, who finally finds the courage to don his artificial legs, arrives at the bar, however, Cliff has become drunk and is discussing the ranch as a serious proposition. Cliff also telephones Pat and insists that she go with him to New Mexico, but she refuses the offer and tries to talk him out of it. Cliff, Bill and Perry are then approached by a group of men who invite them to join their veterans' organization. When the group's spokesman smugly states that no "Catholics, Jews or Negroes" are admitted to the organization, Bill knocks him out and instigates a brawl. During the mêlée, Perry happily discovers that he can still throw a punch, while Bill is hit on his head and is sent to the hospital. Once Bill's condition has stabilized, Cliff comes to terms with his parents and, after declaring his intention to stay in Los Angeles, reunites with Pat. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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