The Chinese Ring (1947)

67-68 mins | Drama | 6 December 1947

Full page view
HISTORY

The title card on the film reads: "Charlie Chan in The Chinese Ring ." The film's working titles were The Red Hornet and Charlie Chan and the Chinese Ring . IFJ reviewed the picture as The Red Hornet . This film marked the first "Charlie Chan" film to star Roland Winters. Winters was the third actor to portray "Chan" in the series, replacing Sidney Toler after his death earlier in 1947. Toler had replaced Warner Oland in the series, which began with the 1931 Fox film Charlie Chan Carries On . Although the CBCS lists Valerie Ardis as "Stenographer," the Var review and studio production files list Charmienne Harker in the role. The Chinese Ring was a remake of the 1939 Monogram film Mr. Wong in Chinatown (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2931. Scott Darling, who is credited with the original story for The Chinese Ring wrote the screenplay for the 1939 film. For more information on the series, consult the Series Index and see the entry for Charlie Chan Carries On in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

The title card on the film reads: "Charlie Chan in The Chinese Ring ." The film's working titles were The Red Hornet and Charlie Chan and the Chinese Ring . IFJ reviewed the picture as The Red Hornet . This film marked the first "Charlie Chan" film to star Roland Winters. Winters was the third actor to portray "Chan" in the series, replacing Sidney Toler after his death earlier in 1947. Toler had replaced Warner Oland in the series, which began with the 1931 Fox film Charlie Chan Carries On . Although the CBCS lists Valerie Ardis as "Stenographer," the Var review and studio production files list Charmienne Harker in the role. The Chinese Ring was a remake of the 1939 Monogram film Mr. Wong in Chinatown (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2931. Scott Darling, who is credited with the original story for The Chinese Ring wrote the screenplay for the 1939 film. For more information on the series, consult the Series Index and see the entry for Charlie Chan Carries On in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.0663. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Dec 1947.
---
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1947.
---
Film Daily
16 Dec 47
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 47
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 47
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 47
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Dec 47
p. 3.
Independent Film Journal
2 Aug 47
p. 34.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Dec 1947.
---
Variety
17 Dec 47
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCER
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Earl Derr Biggers.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
Charlie Chan and the Chinese Ring
The Red Hornet
Release Date:
6 December 1947
Production Date:
21 August--early September 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 November 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1381
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67-68
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

A Chinese princess arrives in San Francisco by boat and visits Detective Charlie Chan at his home. Before an assailant kills the princess by shooting a poison dart through a window, she gives Chan's butler, Birmingham, an ancient Chinese ring. As she dies, the princess writes "Captain K" on a piece of paper, but is unable to finish the captain's name. Chan calls police sergeant Bill Davidson to help him investigate the murder. Bill's friend, reporter Peggy Cartwright, arrives uninvited and identifies the princess as Mei Ling, who came from Asia a few weeks before on a ship captained by two men, Kong and Kelso. Chan soon learns that the princess came to the United States to purchase warplanes for her brother's army in the Orient and brought one million dollars with her. Kelso has received only half his payment, however, and Kong is anxious to receive his share of the arms sales. Peggy searches the princess' apartment, but hides when a masked man enters and ransacks the dresser. Peggy then meets Mei Ling's maid, Lilly Mae, and a boy who lives in the apartment basement. Later, Chan arrives and finds the maid dead. The boy, who is a deaf-mute, tells Chan with gestures that he saw a man enter Mei Ling's apartment. Chan then visits Armstrong, the banker who handled Mei Ling's traveler's checks, and Armstrong tells him that he had to put down one of his vicious guard dogs. Kong and Kelso, anxious to get the rest of their money before their boat sails at midnight, kidnap Chan and Armstrong, bind and gag them, and drive them onto ... +


A Chinese princess arrives in San Francisco by boat and visits Detective Charlie Chan at his home. Before an assailant kills the princess by shooting a poison dart through a window, she gives Chan's butler, Birmingham, an ancient Chinese ring. As she dies, the princess writes "Captain K" on a piece of paper, but is unable to finish the captain's name. Chan calls police sergeant Bill Davidson to help him investigate the murder. Bill's friend, reporter Peggy Cartwright, arrives uninvited and identifies the princess as Mei Ling, who came from Asia a few weeks before on a ship captained by two men, Kong and Kelso. Chan soon learns that the princess came to the United States to purchase warplanes for her brother's army in the Orient and brought one million dollars with her. Kelso has received only half his payment, however, and Kong is anxious to receive his share of the arms sales. Peggy searches the princess' apartment, but hides when a masked man enters and ransacks the dresser. Peggy then meets Mei Ling's maid, Lilly Mae, and a boy who lives in the apartment basement. Later, Chan arrives and finds the maid dead. The boy, who is a deaf-mute, tells Chan with gestures that he saw a man enter Mei Ling's apartment. Chan then visits Armstrong, the banker who handled Mei Ling's traveler's checks, and Armstrong tells him that he had to put down one of his vicious guard dogs. Kong and Kelso, anxious to get the rest of their money before their boat sails at midnight, kidnap Chan and Armstrong, bind and gag them, and drive them onto the ship. Birmingham follows and calls Chan's son Tommy, and together they free Armstrong and Chan. Meanwhile, Peggy and Bill arrive, and when Kelso sees Peggy, he abducts her. Bill and the police come to her rescue, and Kong and Kelso are arrested. Chan then explains that it was Armstrong, not Kong and Kelso, who committed the murders. Armstrong stole Mei Ling's money, then swindled Kelso and Kong out of receiving the balance of their payment. He then killed the maid, as well as the boy, whom he buried instead of his dog. Pointing out that Peggy had phoned in her "scoop" implicating Kong and Kelso before he had exposed Armstrong, Chan insists that women are not meant for heavy thinking. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.