Cass Timberlane (1948)

119 mins | Comedy-drama, Romance | January 1948

Director:

George Sidney

Cinematographer:

Robert Planck

Editor:

John Dunning

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Daniel B. Cathcart

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The onscreen title reads: Sinclair Lewis' Cass Timberlane . The Sinclair Lewis novel on which this film is based appeared serially in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan magazine from May--Oct 1948. An Apr 1945 HR news item reported that M-G-M paid $150,000 for the film rights to Lewis' novel. According to information in M-G-M story files at the USC Cinema-Television Library, novelist John O'Hara worked on a treatment and character studies for the film from 20 Aug 1945 through 15 Jan 1946. M-G-M story files also reveal that Sidney Kingsley worked on drafts of the screenplay in Apr and May 1946, but the extent of O'Hara's and Kingsley's contribution to the completed film has not been determined.
       According to an Aug 1945 HR news item, M-G-M was considering at the time either Spencer Tracy or Walter Pidgeon for the title role. Pidgeon appeared in the film in a brief cameo. A Dec 1945 HR news item notes that M-G-M asked David O. Selznick for the loan-out of actress Jennifer Jones for the female lead. Late 1945 HR news items also note the following: In Oct, while Tracy was set for the title role, M-G-M was negotiating with Vivien Leigh for the female lead. In Nov, Virginia Grey was screen-tested for a "key role," and it was announced that the film would be shot in Minnesota. The film was ultimately shot in and around Los Angeles. In Jan 1947, four months before the start of production, a HR news item reported that producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr. and director George Sidney were "stymied" in their search for ... More Less

The onscreen title reads: Sinclair Lewis' Cass Timberlane . The Sinclair Lewis novel on which this film is based appeared serially in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan magazine from May--Oct 1948. An Apr 1945 HR news item reported that M-G-M paid $150,000 for the film rights to Lewis' novel. According to information in M-G-M story files at the USC Cinema-Television Library, novelist John O'Hara worked on a treatment and character studies for the film from 20 Aug 1945 through 15 Jan 1946. M-G-M story files also reveal that Sidney Kingsley worked on drafts of the screenplay in Apr and May 1946, but the extent of O'Hara's and Kingsley's contribution to the completed film has not been determined.
       According to an Aug 1945 HR news item, M-G-M was considering at the time either Spencer Tracy or Walter Pidgeon for the title role. Pidgeon appeared in the film in a brief cameo. A Dec 1945 HR news item notes that M-G-M asked David O. Selznick for the loan-out of actress Jennifer Jones for the female lead. Late 1945 HR news items also note the following: In Oct, while Tracy was set for the title role, M-G-M was negotiating with Vivien Leigh for the female lead. In Nov, Virginia Grey was screen-tested for a "key role," and it was announced that the film would be shot in Minnesota. The film was ultimately shot in and around Los Angeles. In Jan 1947, four months before the start of production, a HR news item reported that producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr. and director George Sidney were "stymied" in their search for an actress to play the female lead and had begun looking at footage of actresses who had tested during the year. According to a May 1947 HR news item, shooting on the film was suspeded for three days due to illness.
       The world premiere of the film was held as a charity event for the John Tracy Clinic for deaf children, which was founded in 1942 by Spencer Tracy's wife Louise and named for their own deaf child. In Apr 1945, according to HR , Fay Hendry, the mother of Sonya Hendry, a young girl who appeared in the film, was awarded nearly $30,000 for injuries she sustained when the girl was struck by a falling reflector at the site of location filming. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Nov 1947.
---
Film Daily
7 Nov 47
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jan 47
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 48
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 47
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 48
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 47
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
10 May 47
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
21 May 47
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
22 May 47
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 47
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 47
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 46
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 47
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Dec 47
p. 10.
Independent Film Journal
10 May 47
p. 44.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Nov 47
p. 3930.
New York Times
7 Nov 47
p. 20.
Variety
5 Nov 47
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
John Walsh
Charles L. Marsh
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
SOUND
Rec dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hair styles designed by
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Pilot of George Sidney's airplane
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Cass Timberlane: A Novel of Husbands and Wives by Sinclair Lewis (New York, 1945).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sinclair Lewis' Cass Timberlane
Release Date:
January 1948
Production Date:
29 March--22 July 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
19 November 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1314
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
119
Length(in feet):
10,672 , 10,681
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12500
SYNOPSIS

Judge Cass Timberlane, a kind-hearted, middle-aged bachelor, tries case after case in his Grand Republic, Minnesota court, but it is not until he meets Virginia "Jinny" Marshland, a witness, that he takes a personal interest in anyone in his courtroom. Following a tiresome divorce case, Cass finds a notebook that Jinny left in the courtroom. Intrigued by the much younger Jinny and the sketches in her notebook, Cass ventures to the poorer neighborhood of the city where she lives, and finds her playing baseball. Cass offers to umpire her game, after which he takes her out to dinner. The two eventually fall in love, much to the displeasure of Cass's snobbish society friends. With the exception of attorney Bradd Criley, an old friend of Cass, the judge's country club friends believe that he is wrong to cross social lines. Ignoring the prejudices of his peers, Cass marries Jinny and the two go on a happy honeymoon vacation. Time passes, and Cass soon realizes that Jinny is unhappy living in Grand Republic and is looking for excitement. Jinny eventually becomes pregnant, but when the baby is stillborn, her discontent grows stronger. Cass tries to cheer up his wife by teaching her how to fly an airplane, spending more time with her and encouraging her attempt to become an amateur stage actress, but all his efforts end in failure. Jinny later ruins her prospects of starring in a Grand Republic stage play when she gives an all too realistic performance while rehearsing a love scene with her co-star, Bradd. Because of his part in the scandal, Bradd is transferred to his company's office in ... +


Judge Cass Timberlane, a kind-hearted, middle-aged bachelor, tries case after case in his Grand Republic, Minnesota court, but it is not until he meets Virginia "Jinny" Marshland, a witness, that he takes a personal interest in anyone in his courtroom. Following a tiresome divorce case, Cass finds a notebook that Jinny left in the courtroom. Intrigued by the much younger Jinny and the sketches in her notebook, Cass ventures to the poorer neighborhood of the city where she lives, and finds her playing baseball. Cass offers to umpire her game, after which he takes her out to dinner. The two eventually fall in love, much to the displeasure of Cass's snobbish society friends. With the exception of attorney Bradd Criley, an old friend of Cass, the judge's country club friends believe that he is wrong to cross social lines. Ignoring the prejudices of his peers, Cass marries Jinny and the two go on a happy honeymoon vacation. Time passes, and Cass soon realizes that Jinny is unhappy living in Grand Republic and is looking for excitement. Jinny eventually becomes pregnant, but when the baby is stillborn, her discontent grows stronger. Cass tries to cheer up his wife by teaching her how to fly an airplane, spending more time with her and encouraging her attempt to become an amateur stage actress, but all his efforts end in failure. Jinny later ruins her prospects of starring in a Grand Republic stage play when she gives an all too realistic performance while rehearsing a love scene with her co-star, Bradd. Because of his part in the scandal, Bradd is transferred to his company's office in New York City. Jinny sinks further into depression until Cass suggests they take a trip to New York. While Cass visits an old friend of his, Jinny goes sightseeing with Bradd. Jinny wishes to stay in New York, and when Cass tells her that he has rejected a job offer in the city, she throws her first tantrum. Cass is angered by the outburst, and tells Jinny that she is welcome to stay in New York with Bradd. Bradd, however, is content living the single life and has no intention of being a companion to Jinny. When Bradd tells Jinny that he does not want to marry her, she jumps out of the speeding car in which they are driving and is seriously injured. After Lillian Drover, the kind, but timid and unhappy, wife of Jinny's Grand Republic doctor, tells Cass about Jinny's injuries and begs him to go to her, Cass rushes back to New York. He then brings Jinny back to Grand Republic and nurses her back to health. After Jinny makes a full recovery, she tells Cass that he will always be the man for her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.