Joe Palooka in Fighting Mad (1948)

75 mins | Drama | 7 February 1948

Director:

Reginald LeBorg

Writer:

John Bright

Producer:

Hal E. Chester

Cinematographer:

William Sickner

Editor:

Roy Livingston

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

This film's working title was A Palooka Named Joe . For additional information on the "Joe Palooka" series, please consult the Series Index and see the above entry for Joe Palooka, Champ ... More Less

This film's working title was A Palooka Named Joe . For additional information on the "Joe Palooka" series, please consult the Series Index and see the above entry for Joe Palooka, Champ More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
7 Feb 1948.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jan 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Jan 48
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 47
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 48
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Jan 48
p. 4001.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Jan 48
pp. 4037-38.
Variety
28 Jan 48
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Fight seq staged by
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the comic strip "Joe Palooka" created by Ham Fisher, distributed by McNaught Syndicate (1928--1984).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Don't Fall in Love," music and lyrics by Edward Kay and Eddie Maxwell.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
A Palooka Named Joe
Release Date:
7 February 1948
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 4 February 1948
Production Date:
early September 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 February 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1464
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in feet):
6,741
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
12844
SYNOPSIS

When Joe Palooka's manager, Knobby Walsh, has a flat tire, a trucker who once tried out for him as a boxer, offers to take him to an all-night garage. As they drive, Knobby reminisces about a particular episode in boxing champ Joe's career: After Joe wins a tough match, he goes blind. A specialist diagnoses the need for surgery in Canada and the operation proves successful, but the doctor advises Knobby that Joe will not be able to fight for two years. After Knobby announces to the press that Joe is retiring as undefeated heavyweight champion of the world and will be marrying his girl friend, Anne Howe, he conducts a search for a new fighter to manage and eventually buys forty per cent of Jeff Lundy's contract from his manager, Archie Stone. However, Knobby does not realize that the majority of Lundy's contract is held by racketeer George Wendell, who knows that Knobby will provide a legitimate front for him. While Lundy wins a number of bouts, Joe becomes depressed by his inactivity and does not follow through on his wedding plans. Knobby has an idea about putting Joe into show business and arranges a vaudeville tour for him in which singer/socialite Iris March will also participate. When Iris vamps Joe, her boyfriend, Charles Kennedy, shows interest in Anne. Later, when Knobby brings Lundy to Chicago for a fight, he meets up with Joe, who is appearing there. Wendell, meanwhile, blackmails Kennedy into staying away from Anne so that she will return to Joe, marry him and keep him out of the fight game, thereby enabling Lundy to become the next champ. However, Anne unwittingly tells Kennedy about ... +


When Joe Palooka's manager, Knobby Walsh, has a flat tire, a trucker who once tried out for him as a boxer, offers to take him to an all-night garage. As they drive, Knobby reminisces about a particular episode in boxing champ Joe's career: After Joe wins a tough match, he goes blind. A specialist diagnoses the need for surgery in Canada and the operation proves successful, but the doctor advises Knobby that Joe will not be able to fight for two years. After Knobby announces to the press that Joe is retiring as undefeated heavyweight champion of the world and will be marrying his girl friend, Anne Howe, he conducts a search for a new fighter to manage and eventually buys forty per cent of Jeff Lundy's contract from his manager, Archie Stone. However, Knobby does not realize that the majority of Lundy's contract is held by racketeer George Wendell, who knows that Knobby will provide a legitimate front for him. While Lundy wins a number of bouts, Joe becomes depressed by his inactivity and does not follow through on his wedding plans. Knobby has an idea about putting Joe into show business and arranges a vaudeville tour for him in which singer/socialite Iris March will also participate. When Iris vamps Joe, her boyfriend, Charles Kennedy, shows interest in Anne. Later, when Knobby brings Lundy to Chicago for a fight, he meets up with Joe, who is appearing there. Wendell, meanwhile, blackmails Kennedy into staying away from Anne so that she will return to Joe, marry him and keep him out of the fight game, thereby enabling Lundy to become the next champ. However, Anne unwittingly tells Kennedy about Joe's medical condition and he passes the information on to Wendell. When Knobby discovers that Lundy's fights have been fixed and that he is in a partnership with Wendell, he tries to get out of the deal. However, Joe wants in as a partner and Knobby is forced to coldly reject him to keep him out of the mess. Later, when Joe and Anne learn about the setup from Looie, Knobby's assistant, Joe arranges for a meeting with the state boxing commissioner, Knobby and Stone. Joe announces that he is coming out of retirement and, as his contract with Knobby is still valid, requests that he manage him, forcing Knobby to relinquish his deal with Lundy. Knobby is concerned that Joe may be permanently blinded if he returns to the ring and makes a deal with Wendell whereby if Lundy does not hit Joe about the head, Knobby will ensure that Lundy wins on points. By the end of round five of the fight, the crowd is unhappy watching Joe fight defensively and Lundy limit his punches to Joe's body. After Wendell, who has many bets riding on the outcome of the fight, instructs Lundy to change his tactics, Lundy hits Joe several times about the head, almost knocking him out and blurring Joe's vision. Knobby wants to throw in the towel, but when Joe's vision suddenly clears, he rallies and knocks out Lundy. The police, who have been tipped off about a possible fix, arrest Wendell and his henchmen when they approach Knobby. Back on board the truck, Knobby's story has taken so long to relate that they have gone far past the gas station. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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