Julia Misbehaves (1948)

99 mins | Romantic comedy | 5 August 1948

Director:

Jack Conway

Producer:

Everett Riskin

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg

Editor:

John Dunning

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Daniel B. Cathcart

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of this film were The Nutmeg Tree and Speak to Me of Love . M-G-M first announced plans to film a screen adaptation of Margery Sharp's novel in Apr 1941, at which time a HR news item noted that James Hilton had been set to write the screenplay. According to a Nov 1941 HR news item, Hilton worked on the screenplay for several months, but the extent of his contribution to the released film has not been determined. The same news item also noted that Dore Schary replaced Sidney Franklin as the producer and the film was being shelved in late 1941 due to the fact that actress Gracie Fields was not available for the starring role.
       Producer Everett Riskin was assigned to revive the production in Sep 1946, and the film was placed on the 1947 M-G-M production schedule with Greer Garson set for the title role, according to HR . A Dec 1947 HR news item noted that screenwriter Clemence Dane was set to work on the script, but the extent of his contribution to the final film has not been determined. HR production charts list Dame May Whitty in the cast, but she did not appear in the released film. Whitty died on 29 May 1948. Julia Misbehaves was the last film directed by Jack Conway, who died on 11 Oct 1952. Conway began his career in show business as a stage actor in 1907 and appeared in several silent films before directing his first picture in 1915. Conway directed many films for M-G-M, ... More Less

The working titles of this film were The Nutmeg Tree and Speak to Me of Love . M-G-M first announced plans to film a screen adaptation of Margery Sharp's novel in Apr 1941, at which time a HR news item noted that James Hilton had been set to write the screenplay. According to a Nov 1941 HR news item, Hilton worked on the screenplay for several months, but the extent of his contribution to the released film has not been determined. The same news item also noted that Dore Schary replaced Sidney Franklin as the producer and the film was being shelved in late 1941 due to the fact that actress Gracie Fields was not available for the starring role.
       Producer Everett Riskin was assigned to revive the production in Sep 1946, and the film was placed on the 1947 M-G-M production schedule with Greer Garson set for the title role, according to HR . A Dec 1947 HR news item noted that screenwriter Clemence Dane was set to work on the script, but the extent of his contribution to the final film has not been determined. HR production charts list Dame May Whitty in the cast, but she did not appear in the released film. Whitty died on 29 May 1948. Julia Misbehaves was the last film directed by Jack Conway, who died on 11 Oct 1952. Conway began his career in show business as a stage actor in 1907 and appeared in several silent films before directing his first picture in 1915. Conway directed many films for M-G-M, begining with the studio's first sound picture, the 1928 film Alias Jimmy Valentine .
       Julia Misbehaves was the fourth of six films that co-starred Walter Pidgeon and Garson, and was their first since 1944. The film also marked Garson's first starring role in a slapstick comedy. According to the NYT reviewer, M-G-M cast Garson in the film in response to her "agonized pleas that it let her play something less lofty than the stuff she's accustomed to." The NYT reviewer commented that the film "discovers Garson in a bathtub and leaves her in a puddle of mud," and that she was "out of her element" in this film. However, some reviewers were more complimentary to Garson, including the Var reviewer, who wrote that Garson "aquits herself like a lady out to prove she can be hoydenish when necessary. She proves it and audiences will like the new Garson." Sharp's novel also provided the basis for the 1940 Broadway play Lady in Waiting , which starred Gladys Cooper as "Julia Packett." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Aug 1948.
---
Daily Variety
13 Jan 48
p. 11.
Daily Variety
13 Aug 48
p. 3, 12
Film Daily
24 Aug 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 46
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 47
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 48
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Mar 48
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 48
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 48
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 48
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 May 48
p. 4165.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Aug 48
p. 4273.
New York Times
8 Oct 48
p. 30.
Variety
18 Aug 48
p. 11.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Edmond Breon
Joanee Wayne
Joy Lansing
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss Garson's cost by
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hair styles des by
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Grip
Props
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Nutmeg Tree by Margery Sharp (Boston, 1937).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"When You're Playing with Fire," music and lyrics by Jerry Seelen and Hal Borne
"(My) Wonderful One," music by Paul Whiteman and Ferde Grofé, lyrics by Dorothy Terris, based on a musical theme by Marshall Neilan
"Oh, What a Difference the Navy Made to Me!" music by Leslie Alleyn, lyrics by Ralph Stanley.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Speak to Me of Love
The Nutmeg Tree
Release Date:
5 August 1948
Production Date:
12 January--12 April 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
11 August 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1840
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
99
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13097
SYNOPSIS

In 1936, when London showgirl Julia Packett receives an invitation in the mail for the wedding of her daughter Susan, she reveals to her antique-dealer friend, Benjamin "Benji" Hawkins, that years before she married a wealthy man. She explains that he returned from the war, they separated, and because of his family's position, she was forced to leave the baby with them. Sensing that Julia, for once, is being sincere, the long-suffering Benji finances her trip, and she sets out for the family estate in the South of France. When Julia's husband William receives her telegram, he and his mother are shocked that Julia somehow received an invitation, and Mrs. Packett implores William to intercept Julia in Paris. Meanwhile, on the boat to France, Julia meets Fred Ghenoccio, who heads an acrobatic troupe with his mother and five brothers. Because Julia accidentally starts the champagne-loving Ma Ghenoccio on a bender, Julia agrees to take Ma's part in the act when it plays in Paris and sends William a telegram saying that she cannot meet him. With nothing to do, William goes to a show and is pleasantly surprised to see Julia in the Ghenoccio act. She is such a hit with the audience that Freddie asks her to join their troupe and proposes as her train leaves. When Julia arrives at the Packett home, her mother-in-law tells her that the invitation was a mistake and suggests that she leave to avoid embarrassment, but Julia insists on seeing Susan first. When Susan meets Julia, she reveals that it was she who sent the invitation and begs her to stay. Now wanting to buy ... +


In 1936, when London showgirl Julia Packett receives an invitation in the mail for the wedding of her daughter Susan, she reveals to her antique-dealer friend, Benjamin "Benji" Hawkins, that years before she married a wealthy man. She explains that he returned from the war, they separated, and because of his family's position, she was forced to leave the baby with them. Sensing that Julia, for once, is being sincere, the long-suffering Benji finances her trip, and she sets out for the family estate in the South of France. When Julia's husband William receives her telegram, he and his mother are shocked that Julia somehow received an invitation, and Mrs. Packett implores William to intercept Julia in Paris. Meanwhile, on the boat to France, Julia meets Fred Ghenoccio, who heads an acrobatic troupe with his mother and five brothers. Because Julia accidentally starts the champagne-loving Ma Ghenoccio on a bender, Julia agrees to take Ma's part in the act when it plays in Paris and sends William a telegram saying that she cannot meet him. With nothing to do, William goes to a show and is pleasantly surprised to see Julia in the Ghenoccio act. She is such a hit with the audience that Freddie asks her to join their troupe and proposes as her train leaves. When Julia arrives at the Packett home, her mother-in-law tells her that the invitation was a mistake and suggests that she leave to avoid embarrassment, but Julia insists on seeing Susan first. When Susan meets Julia, she reveals that it was she who sent the invitation and begs her to stay. Now wanting to buy Susan presents for all of the Christmasses she missed, Julia goes to the local casino. She loses, but meets Colonel "Bunny" Willowbrook, who, unknown to Julia, is a friend of William. Telling Bunny a phony story about losing her luggage, she tricks him into giving her 6,950 francs, which she uses to pay for Susan's gifts, then sneaks out of the store. When William returns to the house, he is secretly happy to discover that Julia is staying. That night, at the wedding rehearsal, Julia meets Ritchie Lorgan, a young artist whom William has hired to paint murals, and senses an attraction between him and Susan. When Julia and William happily reminisce about their own wedding, Susan gets the idea that they should get back together. Later, Susan tells Julia that Ritchie has kissed her and said that he loves her. Next morning, Julia suggests a picnic to William, who is eager, but chagrined to have Susan included. To keep Susan company, William invites Ritchie, and at the lodge where Julia and William spent their honeymoon, the two couples split up. While Ritchie and Susan are kissing in the woods, William and Julia fall into the lake and are forced to change clothes in the cabin. There they reminisce about their honeymoon and dance, then kiss, until Susan and Ritchie interrupt them. Back at the estate, Mrs. Packett is overjoyed when Freddie arrives, proclaiming that he is Julia's fiancé, and assures him that Julia and William are married in name only. She then invites him and Ma to stay the night. That evening, Susan is nervous and Julia suggests that she elope "with the man she loves." William then "proposes" to Julia, but she is angry as he uses almost the same words as he did years before when he asked for the separation. Just then Mrs. Packett brings in Freddie and Ma, and Julia pretends to be delighted to introduce her fiancé. In the middle of the night, William goes to Julia's room, but is seen by Freddie and an argument ensues among the entire household. William then goes to the casino and runs into Bunny, who relates his recent women troubles. William soon realizes that Julia is the woman and suggests a ruse. At breakfast the next morning, William apologizes to Freddie, and at that moment, Bunny arrives, pretending not to know William and accusing Julia of stealing his 6,950 francs. Although William feigns sympathy for Julia, Freddie is shocked with the sordid details and leaves. Then Mrs. Packett comes in and warmly greets Bunny, alerting Julia to William's deception. Just then, a note from Susan arrives saying that she and Ritchie are being married at the lodge. William drives after them, followed by Julia, but at the lodge, there is another note, saying that they are already married and on their way to England. As their cars are driven off by the servants, Julia and William read the rest of the note,which says that they have forty-eight hours alone to admit their love. Julia angrily walks out, despite a raging storm, but William eventually follows and as they both land in a mud puddle, they laugh hysterically. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.