Everybody Does It (1949)

98 mins | Romantic comedy | November 1949

Full page view
HISTORY

This film's working titles were Strange Bedfellows and Her Master's Voice . According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, the studio bought James M. Cain's unpublished, uncopyrighted short novel Career in C Major on 3 Mar 1937 for $8,000. The novel was subsequently published as Two Can Sing in the Apr 1938 issue of American Magazine but was not published in book form, under its original title, until 1945. For Everybody Does It , the studio contracted noted composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco to create and supervise the operatic sequences. Although, a studio cast list includes a character named "Angelo," played by Kay Bell, Bell was not seen in the viewed print. Cain's story was first filmed in 1939 as Wife, Husband and Friend (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.5101) for which Nunnally Johnson wrote the screenplay. Johnson, who was also an associate producer of the earlier version, updated his screenplay for Everybody Does It and was assisted with "comedy routines" by veteran director Mal St. ... More Less

This film's working titles were Strange Bedfellows and Her Master's Voice . According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, the studio bought James M. Cain's unpublished, uncopyrighted short novel Career in C Major on 3 Mar 1937 for $8,000. The novel was subsequently published as Two Can Sing in the Apr 1938 issue of American Magazine but was not published in book form, under its original title, until 1945. For Everybody Does It , the studio contracted noted composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco to create and supervise the operatic sequences. Although, a studio cast list includes a character named "Angelo," played by Kay Bell, Bell was not seen in the viewed print. Cain's story was first filmed in 1939 as Wife, Husband and Friend (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.5101) for which Nunnally Johnson wrote the screenplay. Johnson, who was also an associate producer of the earlier version, updated his screenplay for Everybody Does It and was assisted with "comedy routines" by veteran director Mal St. Clair. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
3 Sep 1949.
---
Daily Variety
29 Aug 49
p. 3, 15
Film Daily
30 Aug 49
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 49
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 49
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 49
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Sep 49
p. 1.
New York Times
26 Oct 49
p. 32.
Variety
31 Aug 49
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Creation and supv of operatic seq
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
STAND INS
Vocal double for Linda Darnell
Vocal double for Paul Douglas
Vocal stand-in for Linda Darnell
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novella Two Can Sing by James M. Cain in American Magazine (Apr 1938).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"Largo al Factotum" from the opera The Barber of Seville by Gioacchino Antonio Rossini.
SONGS
Selections from the opera Fatima e Solimano , music and libretto by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco
"I Passed By Your Window," music by May H. Brahe, lyrics by Helen Taylor
"On the Road to Mandalay," music by Oley Speaks, lyrics by Rudyard Kipling
+
SONGS
Selections from the opera Fatima e Solimano , music and libretto by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco
"I Passed By Your Window," music by May H. Brahe, lyrics by Helen Taylor
"On the Road to Mandalay," music by Oley Speaks, lyrics by Rudyard Kipling
"The Toreador Song" from the opera Carmen , music by Georges Bizet, English lyrics by T. H. Baker
"Beyond the Blue Horizon," music by Richard A. Whiting and W. Franke Harling, lyrics by Leo Robin.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Strange Bedfellows
Her masters voice
Release Date:
November 1949
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 October 1949
Production Date:
21 February--31 March 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
25 October 1949
Copyright Number:
LP37
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
98
Length(in feet):
8,808
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13730
SYNOPSIS

Leonard Borland is a New York based wrecking contractor whose wife, Doris, has a great interest in classical singing. Having recently slept through most of an opera, Leonard is dismayed when his father-in-law, Major Blair, informs him that Doris is taking the advice of her music-loving mother and is about to recommence singing lessons. Hugo, Doris' teacher, tells her that she could be one of the finest singers in the country were it not for Leonard's bullheaded attitude. Later, when Doris announces that she is going to give a recital, the financially strapped Leonard and his partner, Mike Craig, try to persuade their customers and associates to buy tickets to the concert in order to defray the cost of renting the auditorium. On the day of her recital, Doris discovers that Rudolf Hertz, an influential critic, was misinformed about the concert date, and Leonard is dispatched to track him down. At Hertz's home, meanwhile, opera singer Cecil Carver complains to Hertz that she cannot find a suitable baritone to sing opposite her in a new production. Leonard arrives at the Hertz home and is unable to persuade Hertz to attend the recital but does arouse Cecil's romantic interest. Cecil attends the recital, which is a big success, due largely to the number of friends in the audience. After Leonard discovers that Doris is now planning a concert tour, Cecil phones him offering to give her professional evaluation of the recital. At her apartment, she tells Leonard that Doris has only a "pleasant, little talent." Because Cecil is scheduled to sing a popular song later that evening, she asks Leonard to remind her of the lyrics and is astonished to ... +


Leonard Borland is a New York based wrecking contractor whose wife, Doris, has a great interest in classical singing. Having recently slept through most of an opera, Leonard is dismayed when his father-in-law, Major Blair, informs him that Doris is taking the advice of her music-loving mother and is about to recommence singing lessons. Hugo, Doris' teacher, tells her that she could be one of the finest singers in the country were it not for Leonard's bullheaded attitude. Later, when Doris announces that she is going to give a recital, the financially strapped Leonard and his partner, Mike Craig, try to persuade their customers and associates to buy tickets to the concert in order to defray the cost of renting the auditorium. On the day of her recital, Doris discovers that Rudolf Hertz, an influential critic, was misinformed about the concert date, and Leonard is dispatched to track him down. At Hertz's home, meanwhile, opera singer Cecil Carver complains to Hertz that she cannot find a suitable baritone to sing opposite her in a new production. Leonard arrives at the Hertz home and is unable to persuade Hertz to attend the recital but does arouse Cecil's romantic interest. Cecil attends the recital, which is a big success, due largely to the number of friends in the audience. After Leonard discovers that Doris is now planning a concert tour, Cecil phones him offering to give her professional evaluation of the recital. At her apartment, she tells Leonard that Doris has only a "pleasant, little talent." Because Cecil is scheduled to sing a popular song later that evening, she asks Leonard to remind her of the lyrics and is astonished to discover that he has an excellent operatic voice. When she suggests that he take lessons with a view to singing with the Philharmonic, he balks until she insinuates he could "one-up" his wife. Later, Doris' projected tour is canceled because of competing attractions, and Cecil gives a recital in Pittsburgh, at which she successfully introduces a new American baritone, "Mr. Logan Bennett." After the concert Leonard phones Doris, who thinks he is on the road arranging wrecking contracts, and then resists Cecil's attempts to seduce him. The recitals continue in Washington, Baltimore and Philadelphia. Rossi, Cecil's manager, is excited by the press's reception of Leonard, and Leonard is really enjoying himself. However, when he returns home, he finds that Doris is being treated for shock because of a disastrous booking at a movie palace. Doris tells Leonard that she cannot make a career as a singer, but her mother has arranged a celebratory cocktail party to which she has invited Cecil and her accompanist, Wilkins. Leonard's nervous reaction to the news makes Doris realize that he has been with Cecil. When Cecil tells Doris that Leonard means nothing to her and that he has only been performing with her, everyone is dumbfounded by the notion of Leonard singing, and he is challenged to perform. He obliges with "The Toreador Song," and Doris is suitably chagrined. Later that night, Doris tells Leonard to leave and never return. A few days later, Leonard is awakened in a hotel room by the manager, who tells him that his check has bounced. He phones home but is told that Doris has gone to Palm Beach. As Craig has gone fishing, Leonard asks their secretary, Carol, to bring cash to the hotel. Rossi then calls with an offer for Leonard to sing with the Scala opera company at $500 per week, and Leonard accepts. Doris and her parents attend Leonard's debut. Just before curtain time, Leonard gets stage fright, so Cecil gives him some pills, then Wilkins gives him a potion and his makeup man another potion of which he consumes several glasses. As a result, Leonard feels quite sick and a little drunk, arrives on stage prematurely, and falls down a flight of stairs at center stage. He is dragged off, much to the audience's amusement. When it really is his cue, he is not there. Eventually, he stumbles on, catches his prop chains on a flat support and crashes to the stage again. The rest of the cast struggle to continue the opera while endeavoring to get Leonard off stage. However, he returns, wreaks more havoc and falls into the orchestra pit. After the performance, a livid Cecil slaps Leonard and tells him to leave. Doris comes to his dressing room and they make up. Craig shows up with his wife to tell Leonard that, if they can be on a train to Houston within an hour, they can get a very lucrative wrecking contract. Then, on board the train, as they all burst into a rendition of "Beyond the Blue Horizon," Craig discovers that his own wife has quite a voice. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.