Fighting Fools (1949)

69 mins | Comedy-drama | 17 March 1949

Director:

Reginald LeBorg

Producer:

Jan Grippo

Cinematographer:

William Sickner

Editor:

William Austin

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

This film's working titles were Bowery Comeback and Iron Dukes . The opening titles read: "Leo Gorcey and The Bowery Boys in Fighting Fools ." For more information on "The Bowery Boys" series, consult the Series Index and the entry below for Live Wires ... More Less

This film's working titles were Bowery Comeback and Iron Dukes . The opening titles read: "Leo Gorcey and The Bowery Boys in Fighting Fools ." For more information on "The Bowery Boys" series, consult the Series Index and the entry below for Live Wires . More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Jul 1949.
---
Daily Variety
18 May 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 48
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 49
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Jun 49
p. 4634.
Variety
27 Apr 49
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jan Grippo Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Prize fights staged by
Scr supv
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
Bowery Comeback
Iron Dukes
Release Date:
17 March 1949
Production Date:
mid July--late July 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
13 March 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2275
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69
Length(in feet):
6,211
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Slip Mahoney and the rest of the Bowery Boys are working as concession attendants at a New York boxing arena, hawking programs, hot dogs, drinks and popcorn. The main event is a bout between Joey Prince and the gang's friend, Jimmy Higgins, "The Battler from the Bowery," who will get a shot at the title if he wins that night. During the hopelessly mismatched bout, Jimmy takes a severe beating and is knocked out in the second round. Jimmy never recovers consciousness and Slip and Sach are asked to break the tragic news to his mother. Mrs. Higgins has two other sons, Boomer, Jimmy's younger brother, and older brother Johnny, a former boxer, and the boys decide to help her by finding Johnny, who disappeared when racketeers double-crossed him. They eventually locate him in a bar, drunk with a floozie named Bunny Talbot. Johnny has not heard about Jimmy's death, and the news begins to sober him up. After Slip convinces Johnny that he can get him back into fighting condition in order to earn money to help his mother, Slip, Sach and reporter Gabe Moreno promote a fight card to benefit the Higgins family. Soon, Jimmy's crooked manager, Blinky Harris, whom Slip feels was responsible for Jimmy's death, shows up, trying to attract new boxers to his stable, but Slip throws him out. From the ring, Slip announces that Johnny will soon make a comeback. Although Mrs. Higgins does not want Johnny to fight, Slip, acting as Johnny's manager, persuades their friend Louie to let them use the loft of his sweet shop as a training gym for Johnny. However, noise and damage to his ceiling cause Louie ... +


Slip Mahoney and the rest of the Bowery Boys are working as concession attendants at a New York boxing arena, hawking programs, hot dogs, drinks and popcorn. The main event is a bout between Joey Prince and the gang's friend, Jimmy Higgins, "The Battler from the Bowery," who will get a shot at the title if he wins that night. During the hopelessly mismatched bout, Jimmy takes a severe beating and is knocked out in the second round. Jimmy never recovers consciousness and Slip and Sach are asked to break the tragic news to his mother. Mrs. Higgins has two other sons, Boomer, Jimmy's younger brother, and older brother Johnny, a former boxer, and the boys decide to help her by finding Johnny, who disappeared when racketeers double-crossed him. They eventually locate him in a bar, drunk with a floozie named Bunny Talbot. Johnny has not heard about Jimmy's death, and the news begins to sober him up. After Slip convinces Johnny that he can get him back into fighting condition in order to earn money to help his mother, Slip, Sach and reporter Gabe Moreno promote a fight card to benefit the Higgins family. Soon, Jimmy's crooked manager, Blinky Harris, whom Slip feels was responsible for Jimmy's death, shows up, trying to attract new boxers to his stable, but Slip throws him out. From the ring, Slip announces that Johnny will soon make a comeback. Although Mrs. Higgins does not want Johnny to fight, Slip, acting as Johnny's manager, persuades their friend Louie to let them use the loft of his sweet shop as a training gym for Johnny. However, noise and damage to his ceiling cause Louie to lose customers. After Gabe arranges for an article about Johnny's comeback to appear in his newspaper, Harris reveals to champ Dynamite Carson that Jimmy's fight was supposed to be have been "fixed," but Jimmy would not go along with it. Johnny enters the ring again and wins several fights, making himself eligible for a title match. At a meeting concerning Johnny's future, the boxing commissioner agrees to Harris' suggestion that Johnny fight Joey Prince, with the winner guaranteed a match with Carson. Later, as Mrs. Higgins and Boomer listen to the radio broadcast, the bout between Johnny and Prince begins. However, after Prince takes a dive in the first round, he claims to the commissioner that Johnny was in on it, and both boxers are suspended. Harris, who engineered the dive, then tells Slip that Prince will clear Johnny and the match with Carson can occur, on condition that Johnny takes a dive, then wins the rematch. Although Slip agrees to the plan, he and Johnny intend to double-cross Harris and win the first fight. As "insurance," Harris has Boomer kidnapped on the day of the fight. In the locker room, just before the fight, Slip receives a phone call that Harris has Boomer and that he will not be hurt as long as Johnny loses the fight. The gang is dispatched to comb the city, and Sach follows one of Harris' men to the rooming house where Boomer is being held, and helps the boy to escape. Meanwhile, at the fight, Johnny spars with Carson for the early rounds in the hope that Boomer will be found and he will not have to take a dive. When Boomer appears at ringside, Johnny quickly attacks the champ. However, when Harris sees Boomer, he slips a metal rod into Carson's hand, and Johnny takes a beating, saved only by the bell. Sach sees the rod being removed between rounds and replaces it with a hot dog. With the rod gone, Johnny takes control of the fight and easily knocks Carson out. Afterward, Sach shows the rod to the commissioner, who tells Harris that they are going to take a trip to headquarters. Later, as the boys celebrate, Sach jokingly presents Slip with one of his hot dog buns, into which he has placed the metal rod. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.