Hit Parade of 1951 (1950)

84-85 mins | Comedy | 15 October 1950

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Hit Parade of 1950 . Although six songs by Al Rinker and Floyd Huddleston are listed in reviews and news items, only five of their numbers were heard in the viewed print. Frank Fontaine's onscreen credit reads: "Frank (John L. C. Sevony) Fontaine." For information on other "Hit Parade" films, see entry for The Hit Parade in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; ... More Less

The working title of this film was Hit Parade of 1950 . Although six songs by Al Rinker and Floyd Huddleston are listed in reviews and news items, only five of their numbers were heard in the viewed print. Frank Fontaine's onscreen credit reads: "Frank (John L. C. Sevony) Fontaine." For information on other "Hit Parade" films, see entry for The Hit Parade in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.1934 More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Oct 1950.
---
Daily Variety
20 Oct 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
23 Oct 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
16 May 50
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jun 50
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
28 Oct 50
pp. 545-46.
Variety
25 Oct 50
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
SOURCES
SONGS
"You're So Nice," "How Would I Know," "Wishes Come True," "A Very Happy Character," "Square Dance Samba" and "You Don't Know the Other Side of Me," words and music by Al Rinker and Floyd Huddleston
"Boca Chica," words and music by Betty Garrett and Sy Miller.
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 October 1950
Production Date:
15 May--early June 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
14 November 1950
Copyright Number:
LP507
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84-85
Length(in feet):
7,647
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14735
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In Las Vegas, gambler Joe Blake finds himself $200,000 in debt after losing a double-or-nothing craps wager to his friend, casino owner "Smokey." As fellow gamblers Two-to-One Thompson and Garrity own a 25 percent interest in Smokey's operation, Joe owes them $50,000, and they demand payment within forty-eight hours. To repay the money, Joe and his loyal friend, The Professor, head for a Los Angeles radio station to request a loan from an acquaintance, but are unsuccessful. While in the studio, they overhear Eddie Paul, a radio crooner who is Joe's exact double, discussing plans with his manager, Chuck, to go to Las Vegas to meet women. Unlike the manly, womanizing Joe, the clean-living Eddie is devoted to his girl friend, singer Michele, but she has become frustrated by his lack of passion and rejected him. Chuck convinces Eddie that he can get Michele back, as well as generate publicity for himself, by publicly flirting with beautiful women and making Michele jealous. After Chuck leaves to arrange for the trip, The Professor tricks Eddie into going with him to Las Vegas, while Joe remains in Los Angeles and poses as Eddie. Joe is immediately tested by Michele, who is confused but pleased by the changes in "Eddie's" behavior. Calling her "Mike," Joe impresses Michele with his romantic ways and his strong, hard kisses. In Las Vegas, meanwhile, Eddie is spotted on the street by Joe's girl friend Chicquita, a nightclub performer. In private, The Professor explains to Chicquita that Joe suffered a blow to his head and is now convinced he is crooner Eddie Paul. The Professor persuades Chicquita to go along ... +


In Las Vegas, gambler Joe Blake finds himself $200,000 in debt after losing a double-or-nothing craps wager to his friend, casino owner "Smokey." As fellow gamblers Two-to-One Thompson and Garrity own a 25 percent interest in Smokey's operation, Joe owes them $50,000, and they demand payment within forty-eight hours. To repay the money, Joe and his loyal friend, The Professor, head for a Los Angeles radio station to request a loan from an acquaintance, but are unsuccessful. While in the studio, they overhear Eddie Paul, a radio crooner who is Joe's exact double, discussing plans with his manager, Chuck, to go to Las Vegas to meet women. Unlike the manly, womanizing Joe, the clean-living Eddie is devoted to his girl friend, singer Michele, but she has become frustrated by his lack of passion and rejected him. Chuck convinces Eddie that he can get Michele back, as well as generate publicity for himself, by publicly flirting with beautiful women and making Michele jealous. After Chuck leaves to arrange for the trip, The Professor tricks Eddie into going with him to Las Vegas, while Joe remains in Los Angeles and poses as Eddie. Joe is immediately tested by Michele, who is confused but pleased by the changes in "Eddie's" behavior. Calling her "Mike," Joe impresses Michele with his romantic ways and his strong, hard kisses. In Las Vegas, meanwhile, Eddie is spotted on the street by Joe's girl friend Chicquita, a nightclub performer. In private, The Professor explains to Chicquita that Joe suffered a blow to his head and is now convinced he is crooner Eddie Paul. The Professor persuades Chicquita to go along with Joe's delusion, and Chicquita is charmed by "Joe's" thoughtful, gentle manners. Later, at Smokey's casino, Smokey informs The Professor that he is willing to give Joe a $10,000 stake in order to recoup some of his losses from the previous night. Prompted by The Professor, the non-gambling Eddie tries his hand at craps and wins twenty-seven straight passes, then unwittingly pays off Joe's debt by winning a double-or-nothing bet with Smokey. When Joe, who as Eddie, has accepted Michele's marriage proposal, learns about Eddie's good luck, he hops on the next plane to Las Vegas. At the same time, however, Chicquita takes Eddie to the airport, fearing that he will lose all his winnings if he stays in Las Vegas. Moments after Chicquita puts Eddie on a Los Angeles-bound plane, Joe arrives in another plane and joins a confused Chicquita. The next morning, in Los Angeles, Michele telephones an exhausted Eddie and baffles him by discussing the romantic evening they spent together the night before and their upcoming marriage. Eddie's bewilderment soon ends when Joe, who has returned to Los Angeles with Chicquita, appears at his door. Joe admits his impersonation to Eddie and tells him that if he wants to keep "Mike," he needs to have more confidence and kiss her like a real man. Eddie, in turn, informs Joe that if he wants to keep Chicquita, he should treat her with respect and consideration. The reunited couples then head for Las Vegas for a quick double wedding. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.