Never a Dull Moment (1950)

89 or 87 mins | Western | 22 November 1950

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Come Share My Love . According to a Jan 1946 LAEx news item, Kay Swift's 1943 novel Who Could Ask for Anything More , on which this film was based, was inspired by her real-life marriage to rodeo star Kaye Hubbard. Swift met Hubbard at the New York World's Fair when he was performing in the rodeo and she was in charge of "light music." The couple, who lived on a ranch in Oregon as newlyweds, divorced in early Jan 1946, according to the item. In Sep 1945, HR announced that Myrna Loy was to star in the picture as part of a new contract with RKO. Harriet Parsons was already lined up to produce under executive producer Jack Gross . After Loy dropped out, the project was apparently put on hold until late Dec 1946, when HR again announced that Parsons was producing. Then, in Mar 1949, M-G-M contract star Ann Sothern was announced as the film's lead, but in May 1949, M-G-M rescinded its loan-out deal with RKO, according to HR news items. RKO borrowed William Demarest from Paramount for the production. Although Var and Box list the film's running time as 99 minutes, this length is probably an ... More Less

The working title of this film was Come Share My Love . According to a Jan 1946 LAEx news item, Kay Swift's 1943 novel Who Could Ask for Anything More , on which this film was based, was inspired by her real-life marriage to rodeo star Kaye Hubbard. Swift met Hubbard at the New York World's Fair when he was performing in the rodeo and she was in charge of "light music." The couple, who lived on a ranch in Oregon as newlyweds, divorced in early Jan 1946, according to the item. In Sep 1945, HR announced that Myrna Loy was to star in the picture as part of a new contract with RKO. Harriet Parsons was already lined up to produce under executive producer Jack Gross . After Loy dropped out, the project was apparently put on hold until late Dec 1946, when HR again announced that Parsons was producing. Then, in Mar 1949, M-G-M contract star Ann Sothern was announced as the film's lead, but in May 1949, M-G-M rescinded its loan-out deal with RKO, according to HR news items. RKO borrowed William Demarest from Paramount for the production. Although Var and Box list the film's running time as 99 minutes, this length is probably an error. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Nov 1950.
---
Daily Variety
30 Oct 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Nov 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Dec 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 49
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 50
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
14 Jan 1946.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Nov 50
p. 553.
New York Times
22 Nov 50
p. 20.
Variety
1 Nov 50
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Gaffer
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Who Could Ask for Anything More by Kay Swift (New York, 1943).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Once You Find Your Guy," "The Man with the Big Felt Hat" and "Sagebrush Lullaby," words and music by Kay Swift.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Come Share My Love
Release Date:
22 November 1950
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 November 1950
Production Date:
5 December 1949--1 February 1950
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
21 November 1950
Copyright Number:
LP541
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
89 or 87
Length(in feet):
8,004
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14291
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When cowboy Chris Heyward sees sophisticated Broadway songwriter Kay Kingsley during a benefit rodeo in New York City, he is immediately attracted to her. Friend and fellow rodeo rider Orvie pushes the reluctant Chris, who is a widower, into Kay's arms, and after a whirlwind romance, the two are married. The newlyweds then drive across country to Chris's Wyoming ranch, the Cougar Rock, where they are greeted by Chris's young daughters, Nan and Tina. They also encounter their more prosperous but cantankerous neighbor Mears, who controls Chris's water rights. No sooner does the exhausted couple settle in for the night, than they are dragged out of bed by boisterous well-wishers, anxious for a shivaree. Organizing the shivaree is Jean Morrow, a widowed rancher who, until Kay, was Chris's romantic interest. Jean welcomes Kay without jealousy, however, and the shivaree is a great success until Kay cajoles Mears into dancing with her. An inexperienced dancer, Mears slips and falls into a piece of pie and roars out of the party, humiliated. Later, after only two hours of sleep, Kay and Chris are reawakened by Chris's chatty friends, who insist that the groom join them on a cougar hunt. At five, Kay is again stirred from her sleep by Nan and Tina. The children, who are wary of their new stepmother, inform Kay about all the ranch chores and then watch in horror as she dutifully but ineptly tries to accomplish them. Kay's uncomplaining perseverance soon wins the children over, but despite their support, Kay is overwhelmed by the day's work and fires their Indian cook for trying on her clothes. When Chris ... +


When cowboy Chris Heyward sees sophisticated Broadway songwriter Kay Kingsley during a benefit rodeo in New York City, he is immediately attracted to her. Friend and fellow rodeo rider Orvie pushes the reluctant Chris, who is a widower, into Kay's arms, and after a whirlwind romance, the two are married. The newlyweds then drive across country to Chris's Wyoming ranch, the Cougar Rock, where they are greeted by Chris's young daughters, Nan and Tina. They also encounter their more prosperous but cantankerous neighbor Mears, who controls Chris's water rights. No sooner does the exhausted couple settle in for the night, than they are dragged out of bed by boisterous well-wishers, anxious for a shivaree. Organizing the shivaree is Jean Morrow, a widowed rancher who, until Kay, was Chris's romantic interest. Jean welcomes Kay without jealousy, however, and the shivaree is a great success until Kay cajoles Mears into dancing with her. An inexperienced dancer, Mears slips and falls into a piece of pie and roars out of the party, humiliated. Later, after only two hours of sleep, Kay and Chris are reawakened by Chris's chatty friends, who insist that the groom join them on a cougar hunt. At five, Kay is again stirred from her sleep by Nan and Tina. The children, who are wary of their new stepmother, inform Kay about all the ranch chores and then watch in horror as she dutifully but ineptly tries to accomplish them. Kay's uncomplaining perseverance soon wins the children over, but despite their support, Kay is overwhelmed by the day's work and fires their Indian cook for trying on her clothes. When Chris then returns with a dead cougar, asking that Kay cook dinner for his friends, Kay collapses in tears. Four months later, Kay is still struggling with her domestic chores when a windstorm hits, threatening to blow away the interior of her house. In the midst of the chaos, Jed, her former collaborator, arrives and offers her a job writing a new show with him in New York. Tempted by the promise of easy money, with which she hopes to buy a water-rich ranch, Kay accepts Jed's deal. When Chris returns that night, exhausted from a hard day's work, however, Kay is unable to break the news and informs Jed that she has changed her mind. Soon after, Chris learns that the ranch's only source of water has dried up and determines to confront Mears about it. Before he does, Kay tricks Mears into agreeing to give them more water by threatening to sell the Cougar Rock to a neighboring dude ranch. Unaware of what his wife has done, Chris makes his demands, and is startled when Mears agrees to his terms without a fight. Elated by his apparent victory, Chris invites Kay to join his hunting group that night, but abandons her in the camp the next morning. As Kay angrily prepares breakfast for the men, she hears what she believes is a cougar in the bushes and shoots it. To her and Chris's dismay, her target was actually Mears's prize steer. Kay's error costs the ranch Mears's water, and soon she and Chris are arguing about their future together. When Chris refuses to allow Kay to buy a new ranch by composing a show, she leaves for New York by herself. While Chris returns to the rodeo circuit, Kay works with Jed, but finds she can only write songs with western themes. Eventually, Orvie, Tina and Nan force Chris to go see Kay and admit that he still loves and needs her. After she admits the same, the newlyweds are happily reunited. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.