Quicksand (1950)

79 mins | Drama | 24 March 1950

Director:

Irving Pichel

Writer:

Robert Smith

Producer:

Mort Briskin

Cinematographer:

Lionel Lindon

Editor:

Walter Thompson

Production Designer:

Boris Leven

Production Company:

Samuel H. Stiefel Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

According to news items in HR , Mickey Rooney attempted to withdraw from this production in order to star in A Ticket to Tomahawk , but producer Samuel H. Stiefel, Rooney's partner in the independent production company, held the actor to his contract. HR news items also report that Fritz Lang was considered for director and Ava Gardner and Jean Wallace were sought for the film. Portions of the picture were shot on location in Santa Monica, ... More Less

According to news items in HR , Mickey Rooney attempted to withdraw from this production in order to star in A Ticket to Tomahawk , but producer Samuel H. Stiefel, Rooney's partner in the independent production company, held the actor to his contract. HR news items also report that Fritz Lang was considered for director and Ava Gardner and Jean Wallace were sought for the film. Portions of the picture were shot on location in Santa Monica, CA. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Mar 1950.
---
Daily Variety
24 Feb 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Feb 50
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
4 Mar 50
p. 34.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Feb 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 49
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 49
p. 45.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 49
p. 21.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Mar 50
pp. 213-14.
New York Times
16 Jun 50
p. 28.
The Exhibitor
15 Mar 50
p. 2812.
Variety
1 Mar 50
p. 6.
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 March 1950
Production Date:
21 March--mid April 1949 at General Service Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Samuel H. Stiefel Productions
Copyright Date:
24 March 1950
Copyright Number:
LP2950
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79
Length(in feet):
7,106
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13791
SYNOPSIS

At a diner, young auto mechanic Dan Brady has just finished telling his co-worker Chuck that he has broken up with his adoring girl friend, Helen Calder, when he notices the stunning blonde cashier, Vera Novak. Dan convinces Vera to go out with him that evening, but when he returns to his job at the garage, he remembers that he has no money. While making change at the register, Dan realizes that the bookkeeper will not be in to check the cash drawer for a few days and decides to borrow twenty dollars, intending to pay it back the next day when he collects the money that his friend, Buzz Larson, owes him. That night, he and Vera go to the Santa Monica pier, and she tells him she used to work in the arcade managed by the shady Nick. The next day, Dan is unable to reach Buzz, and when the bookkeeper arrives two days ahead of schedule, Dan buys an expensive watch on credit and pawns it, racing back to the garage just in time to replace the money. The next day, an investigator named Moriarity comes to the garage and tells Dan that if he does not repay the jewelry store within twenty-four hours, he will be arrested for grand larceny. That night, after a fruitless search for money, Dan goes to a bar on the pier, where he notices that the drunken Shorty McCabe, who runs the bingo parlor, has a wallet full of cash. Dan follows Shorty to the parking lot and robs him, but is seen by a witness whose screams bring the police. Dan goes ... +


At a diner, young auto mechanic Dan Brady has just finished telling his co-worker Chuck that he has broken up with his adoring girl friend, Helen Calder, when he notices the stunning blonde cashier, Vera Novak. Dan convinces Vera to go out with him that evening, but when he returns to his job at the garage, he remembers that he has no money. While making change at the register, Dan realizes that the bookkeeper will not be in to check the cash drawer for a few days and decides to borrow twenty dollars, intending to pay it back the next day when he collects the money that his friend, Buzz Larson, owes him. That night, he and Vera go to the Santa Monica pier, and she tells him she used to work in the arcade managed by the shady Nick. The next day, Dan is unable to reach Buzz, and when the bookkeeper arrives two days ahead of schedule, Dan buys an expensive watch on credit and pawns it, racing back to the garage just in time to replace the money. The next day, an investigator named Moriarity comes to the garage and tells Dan that if he does not repay the jewelry store within twenty-four hours, he will be arrested for grand larceny. That night, after a fruitless search for money, Dan goes to a bar on the pier, where he notices that the drunken Shorty McCabe, who runs the bingo parlor, has a wallet full of cash. Dan follows Shorty to the parking lot and robs him, but is seen by a witness whose screams bring the police. Dan goes to the arcade to meet Vera, and when he finds Nick manhandling her, he knocks him down, accidentally leaving behind the handkerchief he used to cover his face during the robbery. The next day, Nick calls Dan and says he knows about the robbery, and demands a new car in exchange for the handkerchief. Desperate, Dan steals a car from the garage, and later, his mean-spirited boss Mackey tells Dan that he was seen taking the car, and threatens to go to the police unless Dan pays him a marked-up price for it. Dan confides his problems to Vera, and she suggests that they steal the money from Nick's office. The robbery nets enough cash to pay off Mackey, but Vera spends half of it on a mink coat. With the remaining money, Dan meets his boss at the deserted garage, but after Mackay takes the cash, he pulls a gun on Dan and starts to call the police. The men struggle, and Dan strangles Mackey. Later, on the street, Dan encounters Helen and Chuck, who tells him that he quit his job after Mackey tried to extort money from him for the stolen car. Dan goes to Vera, but the police soon arrive, acting on a tip from Nick, and he hides on the fire escape as they arrest her. Dan climbs down the fire escape and finds Helen waiting for him by his car. After Helen declares her love for him, Dan tells her everything, and they decide to run away to Mexico. The car breaks down, however, and Dan uses the gun he took from Mackey to kidnap Harvey, a passing motorist, and force him to be their driver. When Harvey, who is a lawyer, tells them that Helen is not yet guilty of any crime, Dan orders Harvey to take him to the pier, where he will seek out Buzz. As Harvey and Helen drive away, they hear a radio news report announcing that Mackey is alive, and head back to the pier just as the police wound and capture Dan. The kindly Harvey offers reassurances about Dan's probable sentence, and Helen promises to wait for him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.