Two Weeks with Love (1950)

91-92 mins | Musical comedy | 10 November 1950

Director:

Roy Rowland

Producer:

Jack Cummings

Cinematographer:

Alfred Gilks

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Preston Ames

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Tender Hours, and it was reviewed in Var as Two Weeks--With Love. According to a Dec 1948 M-G-M News item, Elizabeth Taylor was originally set for the part played by Jane Powell. A pre-production news item in HR indicates that Eugene Loring was originally set as the film's dance director. A Mar 1950 DV news item noted that actor Leon Ames was selected for a role, but he did not appear in the final film. According to an Apr 1950 DV news item, many scenes in the picture were filmed twice: once for prints to be shown to American audiences, and a second time, with the substitution of certain words and phrases, for British audiences. The song "Aba Daba Honeymoon," originally recorded in 1914, became a hit recording for Debbie Reynolds and Carleton Carpenter following the release of the film. Powell and Ricardo Montalban recreated their film roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story, which aired on 8 Sep 1952. ...

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The working title of this film was The Tender Hours, and it was reviewed in Var as Two Weeks--With Love. According to a Dec 1948 M-G-M News item, Elizabeth Taylor was originally set for the part played by Jane Powell. A pre-production news item in HR indicates that Eugene Loring was originally set as the film's dance director. A Mar 1950 DV news item noted that actor Leon Ames was selected for a role, but he did not appear in the final film. According to an Apr 1950 DV news item, many scenes in the picture were filmed twice: once for prints to be shown to American audiences, and a second time, with the substitution of certain words and phrases, for British audiences. The song "Aba Daba Honeymoon," originally recorded in 1914, became a hit recording for Debbie Reynolds and Carleton Carpenter following the release of the film. Powell and Ricardo Montalban recreated their film roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story, which aired on 8 Sep 1952.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Oct 1950
---
Daily Variety
15 Feb 1950
p. 15
Daily Variety
6 Mar 1950
p. 2
Daily Variety
23 Mar 1950
p. 2
Daily Variety
14 Apr 1950
p. 2
Film Daily
11 Oct 1950
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 1950
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1950
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Oct 1950
pp. 517-18
New York Times
24 Nov 1950
p. 31
Variety
11 Oct 1950
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Irvine Warburton
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Richard A. Pefferle
Assoc
COSTUMES
Women's cost
Men's cost
MUSIC
Georgie Stoll
Mus dir
Orch
Vocal arr
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Mus numbers staged by
MAKEUP
William J. Tuttle
Makeup created by
Hair styles des by
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"A Heart That's Free," music and lyrics by Alfred G. Robyn and Thomas T. Railey; "Destiny," music and lyrics by Sidney Baynes; "Oceana Roll," music by Lucien Denni, lyrics by Roger Lewis; "The Aba Daba Honeymoon," music and lyrics by Arthur Fields and Walter Donovan; "By the Light of the Silvery Moon," music by Gus Edwards, lyrics by Edward Madden; "My Hero," from the operetta The Chocolate Soldier , music and libretto by Oscar Straus; "Row, Row, Row," music by James V. Monaco, lyrics by William Jerome.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Tender Hours
Release Date:
10 November 1950
Production Date:
23 Mar--late May 1950
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
11 October 1950
LP513
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
91-92
Length(in feet):
8,228
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14648
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In the summer of 1913, seventeen-year-old Patti Robinson joins her mother Katherine, her father Horatio, her younger sister Melba and her younger brothers McCormick and Ricky on her family's annual vacation at a mountain resort in Kissamee, New York. Though Patti believes that she has reached adulthood and is ready to begin dating boys, her somewhat prudish and over-protective mother believes otherwise and insists that Patti wait until she reaches the age of eighteen. As soon as Patti arrives at the resort, Billy Finlay, the sixteen-year-old son of the hotel manager, resumes his objective of the previous summer and tries to court her. Patti avoids Billy and instead turns her attention to an unfamiliar guest at the resort, a handsome young Cuban man named Demi Armendez. Demi also catches the eye of Patti's friend Valerie Stresemann, who is over eighteen, egotistical and wears a corset to pinch her figure. Patti wishes that she, too, could wear a corset to attract young men, but her mother insists on outfitting her with clothes to make her appear young and, to Patti's mind, unattractive. One day, during a family outing at the riverbank, Patti sees Valerie and Demi approaching and, embarrassed to be seen playing on the children's side of the beach, asks Melba to bury her with sand. Horatio later learns that Patti has been ridiculed for wearing an ugly bathing suit, so he takes his daughter's side and urges Katherine to show more consideration for Patti's feelings. Later, Valerie tries to sabotage Patti's attempts to attract Demi by giving her bad advice and telling her that she should act more like the famous motion picture actress Theda ...

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In the summer of 1913, seventeen-year-old Patti Robinson joins her mother Katherine, her father Horatio, her younger sister Melba and her younger brothers McCormick and Ricky on her family's annual vacation at a mountain resort in Kissamee, New York. Though Patti believes that she has reached adulthood and is ready to begin dating boys, her somewhat prudish and over-protective mother believes otherwise and insists that Patti wait until she reaches the age of eighteen. As soon as Patti arrives at the resort, Billy Finlay, the sixteen-year-old son of the hotel manager, resumes his objective of the previous summer and tries to court her. Patti avoids Billy and instead turns her attention to an unfamiliar guest at the resort, a handsome young Cuban man named Demi Armendez. Demi also catches the eye of Patti's friend Valerie Stresemann, who is over eighteen, egotistical and wears a corset to pinch her figure. Patti wishes that she, too, could wear a corset to attract young men, but her mother insists on outfitting her with clothes to make her appear young and, to Patti's mind, unattractive. One day, during a family outing at the riverbank, Patti sees Valerie and Demi approaching and, embarrassed to be seen playing on the children's side of the beach, asks Melba to bury her with sand. Horatio later learns that Patti has been ridiculed for wearing an ugly bathing suit, so he takes his daughter's side and urges Katherine to show more consideration for Patti's feelings. Later, Valerie tries to sabotage Patti's attempts to attract Demi by giving her bad advice and telling her that she should act more like the famous motion picture actress Theda Bara. Patti tries to act more worldly, mysterious and helpless, but her plan fails and she eventually realizes that Valerie is not a true friend. One evening, while canoeing on the river, Patti falls asleep and has a dream. In the dream, Demi compliments her singing and professes his love for her but reacts with outrage when she reveals that she is not wearing a corset. Patti awakens from her dream screaming for Demi to return and falls into the lake when she tries to stand up in the canoe. Demi sees Patti fall into the water and tries to save her, but she saves herself and runs off into the woods, embarrassed again. Patti returns to her room soaking wet, and when Demi follows her there, Horatio misunderstands his motives and accuses him of improper behavior. Later, when Patti learns that Demi is taking Valerie to the big dance at the resort, she becomes despondent. Refusing to attend the dance, Patti locks herself in her room and studies Spanish instead. Patti eventually agrees to attend the dance with Billy, and, much to her surprise, she winds up in Demi's arms when he asks her to dance. She returns to her room later that night feeling happy and lovesick, but she is still angry that she is not allowed to wear a corset. In an attempt to help Patti's difficult transition into womanhood, Horatio goes to town to buy her a corset. Unfortunately, Horatio's lack of knowledge of women's undergarments results in his purchase of a surgical corset. Unaware that her corset is a surgical one, Patti wears it during her dance performance at the resort talent show. While dancing a tango with Demi, she is dipped and her corset locks. Unable to straighten her back, Patti is rushed backstage, where she is released from the corset's hold with help from her mother, who finally realizes that her daughter has grown up. The summer vacation ends happily for Patti when she makes amends with her mother, and when Demi promises to call her.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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