Appointment for Love (1941)

87-89 mins | Romantic comedy | 31 October 1941

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Heartbeat . The on-screen credits acknowledge that the "rights" were "by arrangement with Chas. K. Feldman." According to information found in the Charles K. Feldman papers at the AFI Library, this project was initiated in 1938 as an original screenplay called Heartbeat written by Ladislaus Bus-Fekete with producer-director Otto Preminger attached. Feldman-Blum Corp.orp. purchased the screenplay outright from Bus-Fekete for $8,000 under a partnership agreement with Preminger. Under this agreement, Bus-Fekete was assured an author credit should his work be produced. Feldman-Blum later purchased Preminger's interest in the material for $1,000. Feldman-Blum then hired writers Edward Kaufman, Charles Kaufman, Helen Deutsch, Lewis Foster and Franklin D. Coen to work on the script at various times. Feldman-Blum made numerous attempts during these re-writes to interest Walter Wanger Productions, Howard Hughes, Warner Bros., and Twentieth Century-Fox in the project, with no success. They were finally able, however, to sell the script to Universal for $50,000 in Jun 1941. The Feldman papers also indicate that director Sidney Lanfield was once attached to this project and sold his rights to the material for $7,500 to Universal through Feldman-Blum. A Mar 1941 HR news item states that Universal purchased an original story by writers Jack Rubin and Oscar Brodney entitled "Appointment for Love," but it has not been determined if anything other than the title of this work was used for this film. HR reported in Jun 1941 that the film's original production dates were moved back approximately one month due to the fatigue of actor Charles Boyer. According to Universal ... More Less

The working title of this film was Heartbeat . The on-screen credits acknowledge that the "rights" were "by arrangement with Chas. K. Feldman." According to information found in the Charles K. Feldman papers at the AFI Library, this project was initiated in 1938 as an original screenplay called Heartbeat written by Ladislaus Bus-Fekete with producer-director Otto Preminger attached. Feldman-Blum Corp.orp. purchased the screenplay outright from Bus-Fekete for $8,000 under a partnership agreement with Preminger. Under this agreement, Bus-Fekete was assured an author credit should his work be produced. Feldman-Blum later purchased Preminger's interest in the material for $1,000. Feldman-Blum then hired writers Edward Kaufman, Charles Kaufman, Helen Deutsch, Lewis Foster and Franklin D. Coen to work on the script at various times. Feldman-Blum made numerous attempts during these re-writes to interest Walter Wanger Productions, Howard Hughes, Warner Bros., and Twentieth Century-Fox in the project, with no success. They were finally able, however, to sell the script to Universal for $50,000 in Jun 1941. The Feldman papers also indicate that director Sidney Lanfield was once attached to this project and sold his rights to the material for $7,500 to Universal through Feldman-Blum. A Mar 1941 HR news item states that Universal purchased an original story by writers Jack Rubin and Oscar Brodney entitled "Appointment for Love," but it has not been determined if anything other than the title of this work was used for this film. HR reported in Jun 1941 that the film's original production dates were moved back approximately one month due to the fatigue of actor Charles Boyer. According to Universal press materials, actress Susan Miller was cast in this film, but her participation in the final film has not been confirmed. The film had a preview in Glendale, CA on 22 Oct 1941. NYT reported in Jul 1946 that this film was one of the first American pictures to be shown to German civilians after the conclusion of World War II. It received an Academy Award nomination in the Sound Recording category. Margaret Sullavan, Charles Boyer and director William Seiter had previously worked together on the 1941 Universal film Back Street (See Entry). Charles Boyer reprised his role in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 23 Feb 1942, co-starring Myrna Loy. The broadcast was repeated on 1 May 1944. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Dec 41
p. 570.
Box Office
1-Nov-41
---
Daily Variety
22 Oct 41
p. 3.
Film Daily
28 Oct 1941.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
8 May 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 41
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 41
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Nov 41
p. 341.
New York Times
7 Nov 41
p. 7.
New York Times
23 Jul 1946.
---
Variety
29 Oct 41
p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Bruce Manning Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
Margaret Sullavan's gowns by
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus score
SOUND
[Sd] tech
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit pub wrt
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Heartbeat
Release Date:
31 October 1941
Production Date:
16 July--late August 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
29 October 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10806
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
87-89
Length(in feet):
8,015
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7698
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Physician Jane Alexander falls asleep at the opening of a new play by playboy writer Andre "Pappy" Cassil. Later, Andre tries to romance Edith Meredith at the cast party only to have Nancy Benson, his girl friend actress, interrupt with a phone call from New York. When Jane arrives to pick up the purse she left in the theater, Andre hands the call over to his producer, George Hastings. Enchanted by her ideas about love, Andre follows Jane to her hospital. When her supervisor, Dr. Gunther, enters her office, Jane is forced to give Andre a physical examination. Andre continues his dogged pursuit of Jane, but she rejects all his overtures until the night he calls for an ambulance at a restaurant and ends up getting into a fight with another patron. The two begin seeing each other, but Jane's devotion to her profession limits their social time together. Despite this, the two are soon married and plan a two-week honeymoon at his mountain retreat. Nancy interrupts their honeymoon night by insisting that Andre meet her at the local train depot. She then coerces Andre into casting her in the lead of his new play, in hopes that it will help her "get over him." Returning to the retreat, Jane tells Andre that he had nothing to worry about, as she does not believe in jealousy. Jane is then called back to New York on an emergency. Later, Andre becomes upset when Jane takes her own apartment in his building, stating that their separate careers require separate residences. Andre goes to George for advice, who suggests that ... +


Physician Jane Alexander falls asleep at the opening of a new play by playboy writer Andre "Pappy" Cassil. Later, Andre tries to romance Edith Meredith at the cast party only to have Nancy Benson, his girl friend actress, interrupt with a phone call from New York. When Jane arrives to pick up the purse she left in the theater, Andre hands the call over to his producer, George Hastings. Enchanted by her ideas about love, Andre follows Jane to her hospital. When her supervisor, Dr. Gunther, enters her office, Jane is forced to give Andre a physical examination. Andre continues his dogged pursuit of Jane, but she rejects all his overtures until the night he calls for an ambulance at a restaurant and ends up getting into a fight with another patron. The two begin seeing each other, but Jane's devotion to her profession limits their social time together. Despite this, the two are soon married and plan a two-week honeymoon at his mountain retreat. Nancy interrupts their honeymoon night by insisting that Andre meet her at the local train depot. She then coerces Andre into casting her in the lead of his new play, in hopes that it will help her "get over him." Returning to the retreat, Jane tells Andre that he had nothing to worry about, as she does not believe in jealousy. Jane is then called back to New York on an emergency. Later, Andre becomes upset when Jane takes her own apartment in his building, stating that their separate careers require separate residences. Andre goes to George for advice, who suggests that he go along with Jane's idea of "two people, two lives" until he can make her become jealous. Andre and Jane are interrupted at lunch the same day by Jane's old suitor, explorer Michael Dailey, who tells them that he plans to do everything he can to break up their marriage. Andre then invites Edith to dinner, hoping to make Jane jealous, but the physician wife does not respond in the hoped for manner. When Andre follows Jane up to her apartment, however, he becomes jealous himself when he finds Michael there. Later, the newlyweds each plan romantic evenings at the other's apartment, unaware that they have chosen the same evening for their tryst. The next day, Andre confronts Jane during a live radio broadcast, demanding to know where she spent the night. The couple becomes a national gossip sensation, making headlines coast to coast. Jane files for divorce and plans to join Michael on an expedition until Gus, the elevator operator, tells her the truth about the couple's mysterious night apart. That evening, Jane arrives uninvited at Andre's dinner party, slaps Nancy and announces that she is no longer seeking a divorce. Andre follows Jane back to her apartment and finally learns the truth. The couple makes up, and, as Gus leaves the building, he finds both keys to Jane's apartment lying on the sidewalk. He picks them up, smiles, then drops them down the storm drain. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.