There's Magic in Music (1941)

80 mins | Musical | 7 March 1941

Director:

Andrew L. Stone

Producer:

Andrew L. Stone

Cinematographer:

Theodor Sparkuhl

Editor:

James Smith

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Earl Hedrick

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The first two reels of this film was not viewed; opening credits were derived from a release dialogue script at the AMPAS Library. The order of these screen credits differs significantly from the onscreen end credits. The opening credits contain the following statement: "The children in this picture actually performed the musical numbers as shown." The working titles of the film were Interlochen and Magic in Music . The film was initially released in Mar 1941 as The Hard-Boiled Canary ; however, according to HR , Paramount retitled and re-released the film with a new publicity campaign in May 1941.
       According to information in the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library, Paramount purchased Ann Ronell's option on the exclusive story rights to the National Music Camp in Dec 1939. In the spring of 1940, Paramount executives proposed a tie-in with the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York City, which was trying to raise one million dollars for preservation, but the idea was apparently vetoed. Exteriors for the film were shot on location at Lake Arrowhead, CA, according to production files. HR also notes that the "outdoor bowl" at Interlochen was recreated at the studio. According to the DV review, a choral group from the University of Southern California performed in the film. The National Music Camp at Interlochen, MI, was founded in 1928 by Michigan University professor Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, and still serves as a summer training ground for young classical ... More Less

The first two reels of this film was not viewed; opening credits were derived from a release dialogue script at the AMPAS Library. The order of these screen credits differs significantly from the onscreen end credits. The opening credits contain the following statement: "The children in this picture actually performed the musical numbers as shown." The working titles of the film were Interlochen and Magic in Music . The film was initially released in Mar 1941 as The Hard-Boiled Canary ; however, according to HR , Paramount retitled and re-released the film with a new publicity campaign in May 1941.
       According to information in the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library, Paramount purchased Ann Ronell's option on the exclusive story rights to the National Music Camp in Dec 1939. In the spring of 1940, Paramount executives proposed a tie-in with the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York City, which was trying to raise one million dollars for preservation, but the idea was apparently vetoed. Exteriors for the film were shot on location at Lake Arrowhead, CA, according to production files. HR also notes that the "outdoor bowl" at Interlochen was recreated at the studio. According to the DV review, a choral group from the University of Southern California performed in the film. The National Music Camp at Interlochen, MI, was founded in 1928 by Michigan University professor Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, and still serves as a summer training ground for young classical musicians. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Mar 41
p. 128.
Box Office
1 Mar 41.
---
Daily Variety
20 Feb 1941.
---
Film Daily
11 Mar 1941.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 40
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 40
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 40
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 40
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Feb 41
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 41
p. 1, 4
Motion Picture Herald
1 Mar 1941.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Jan 41
p. 46.
New York Times
5 Jun 41
p. 27.
Variety
26 Feb 41
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Based on an idea by
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus supv
Operatic wrangle devised by
Cond California Junior Symphony Orchestra
DANCE
Dances staged by
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
MUSIC
Overture to the opera Cola Rienzi, the Last of the Tribunes , music and libretto by Richard Wagner
Hungarian Dances by Johannes Brahms
"Liebestraum" by Franz Liszt
+
MUSIC
Overture to the opera Cola Rienzi, the Last of the Tribunes , music and libretto by Richard Wagner
Hungarian Dances by Johannes Brahms
"Liebestraum" by Franz Liszt
"By the Brook" by René Boisdeffre
"Serenade" by Franz Schubert.
+
SONGS
Selections from the opera Faust , music by Charles Gounod, libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré
selections from the opera Carmen , music by Georges Bizet, libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy
Carmen - Faust medley, additional lyrics by Edwin Lester
+
SONGS
Selections from the opera Faust , music by Charles Gounod, libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré
selections from the opera Carmen , music by Georges Bizet, libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy
Carmen - Faust medley, additional lyrics by Edwin Lester
"The Shadow Song" from the opera Dinorah, ou le pardon de Plöermel , music by Giacomo Meyerbeer, libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré
"Fireflies on Parade," music and lyrics by Ann Ronell
"To Hear Your Voice Again," music by Anton Rubinstein, lyrics by Ann Ronell
"The Mountain Song," music from Edvard Grieg's Concerto in A Minor, lyrics by Ann Ronell
"Sylvia," music and lyrics by Clinton Scollard and Oley Speaks
"Casey Jones," music by Eddie Newton, lyrics by T. Lawrence Seibert
"The Stars and Stripes Forever," music by John Philip Sousa, lyrics by Bob Russell
"Voices of Spring," music and lyrics by Richard Strauss
"You Made Me Love You," music by James V. Monaco, lyrics by Joseph McCarthy
"Oh Johnny!" music and lyrics by Ed Ross and Abe Olman
"Falling in Love Again," music and lyrics by Frederick Hollander
"The Sleigh," music and lyrics by Ivor Tehervanow and Richard Kountz.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Hard Boiled Canary
Interlochen
Release Date:
7 March 1941
Production Date:
17 June--30 July 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 March 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10308
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in feet):
7,188
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
6475
SYNOPSIS

While being interviewed on the radio by announcer Deems Taylor about the National Music Camp at Interlochen, Michigan, which provides a summer music training camp for talented children. Michael Maddy, loafer son of the camp's director, university professor Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, digresses and starts talking about Toodles LaVerne, a burlesque entertainer whom he claims is a legitimate opera singer. After the producers pull him off the broadcast, Michael makes a wager with his friend, George Thomas, the publicity agent for the Manhattan Opera Company, that Toodles is an opera singer. Michael wins the bet when George attends the burlesque show and Toodles sings a variation on an Italian opera. When the theater is raided by police, Toodles' dance partner, Maidie Duvalle, is caught, but Toodles escapes into Michael and George's limousine. Michael takes pity on the teenager and brings her to his apartment, where she changes from her risqué costume into regular clothes. Michael and George discover that the orphan Toodles taught herself to sing by listening to records. Duly impressed by her voice and her fear of being remanded to a reform school, Michael gets himself appointed as Toodles' guardian and takes her to Interlochen. Upon arriving there, Michael, who has taken over the camp because of his father's illness, asks Sylvia Worth, the camp's new efficiency expert, to give Toodles a scholarship. Sylvia is initially resistant because the school is in financial difficulty and the Board of Directors has threatened to withdraw its funding at even the hint of a problem. Toodles, meanwhile, befriends fourteen-year-old Heimo Haitto, a war refugee from Finland who is a talented violinist. When bully William Chapman picks on Heimo, ... +


While being interviewed on the radio by announcer Deems Taylor about the National Music Camp at Interlochen, Michigan, which provides a summer music training camp for talented children. Michael Maddy, loafer son of the camp's director, university professor Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, digresses and starts talking about Toodles LaVerne, a burlesque entertainer whom he claims is a legitimate opera singer. After the producers pull him off the broadcast, Michael makes a wager with his friend, George Thomas, the publicity agent for the Manhattan Opera Company, that Toodles is an opera singer. Michael wins the bet when George attends the burlesque show and Toodles sings a variation on an Italian opera. When the theater is raided by police, Toodles' dance partner, Maidie Duvalle, is caught, but Toodles escapes into Michael and George's limousine. Michael takes pity on the teenager and brings her to his apartment, where she changes from her risqué costume into regular clothes. Michael and George discover that the orphan Toodles taught herself to sing by listening to records. Duly impressed by her voice and her fear of being remanded to a reform school, Michael gets himself appointed as Toodles' guardian and takes her to Interlochen. Upon arriving there, Michael, who has taken over the camp because of his father's illness, asks Sylvia Worth, the camp's new efficiency expert, to give Toodles a scholarship. Sylvia is initially resistant because the school is in financial difficulty and the Board of Directors has threatened to withdraw its funding at even the hint of a problem. Toodles, meanwhile, befriends fourteen-year-old Heimo Haitto, a war refugee from Finland who is a talented violinist. When bully William Chapman picks on Heimo, Toodles sticks up for him and knocks Bill out. Heimo then accompanies Toodles to her cabin, where she meets her roommates: singing pianist Dolly Loehr, singing violinist Kaye Connor, and violinist Patricia Travers, who would rather spend the summer at the beach. Toodles is awestruck by her talented bunkmates, but shows no interest in learning to read music or participating in camp activities. Later Sylvia is surprised when Michael and George admit that they "recruited" Toodles from a burlesque show and that she is on parole from a reform school. Although Sylvia worries that Toodles' inferior background could sully the reputation of the camp, she lets her stay. Despite Toodles' screams and cries, Michael and George forcibly wash the make-up off her face and insist that she wear a uniform. Later that night, Michael urges her to perform for the rest of the students, who happily accept the new recruit when she proves her singing ability. Michael then insists that Toodles learn to read music so she can audition with the rest of the school for a benefit with the Manhattan Opera Company. When Bill finds out that Toodles is on parole from reform school, he spreads the news to the rest of the students. Toodles finds she has loyal friends in Heimo, Dolly, Pat and Kaye, who offer to teach her how to read and interpret music. When Manhattan Opera representatives arrive early for the audition, Kaye pretends to have laryngitis so that Toodles will be compelled to perform, even though she is not familiar with the music. Toodles delights everyone when she proves her sight reading skills, and the Manhattan Opera representatives are greatly impressed. Later, however, Toodles decides to leave the camp after Maidie publishes an article about Toodles, which creates bad publicity for the school. As a result, many parents withdraw their children, and the financial backers threaten to withdraw their support. Presuming that Toodles had the article printed out of malice, Sylvia confronts the teenager before she leaves, but realizes she is wrong when she overhears Maidie apologizing for causing so much grief. Toodles then returns to New York with Maidie, and Sylvia follows her, intending to lure the financiers back. When Michael learns of the chain of events, he and a group of Toodles' closest friends from the camp go to New York and insist that she sing with them at the Manhattan Opera show. Toodles agrees, and Bill apologizes for misjudging her. That night, Toodles' soaring voice and the talent of Michael and the students shine through, and the financial backers renew their promise to support the camp. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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