Week-End for Three (1941)

66 mins | Romantic comedy | 12 December 1941

Director:

Irving Reis

Producer:

Tay Garnett

Cinematographer:

Russell Metty

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

News items in HR offer the following information about the casting and production of this film: In Nov 1940, Erich Pommer was initially slated to produce this picture, Garson Kanin was to direct, and Irene Dunne and Cary Grant were to play the leads. In Dec 1940, a news item reported that Ginger Rogers would replace Irene Dunne, who had to withdraw because of prior commitments. In May 1941, a news item noted that Ruth Warrick had been cast as "Ellen," the female lead. An early Jul 1941 news item then announced that Jane Wyatt was assigned the part of "Ellen" after Dorothy Comingore was suspended for refusing the role. In mid-Jul, contract player Dennis O'Keefe was suspended by RKO for refusing to appear as "Jim," the male lead, because he felt that the part was inconsequential. Two days later, a news item announced that Peter Lind Hayes would replace O'Keefe, but O'Keefe appears as "Jim" in the released film. A Jun 1941 news item adds that Tay Garnett was taking over from producer Erich Pommer, who was leaving the studio because of illness. According to 1944 news items in HR , writer Harold Kingston filed a piracy suit against RKO in federal court, charging that the studio used his play Cocktail Waves as a basis for this film. The suit was later ... More Less

News items in HR offer the following information about the casting and production of this film: In Nov 1940, Erich Pommer was initially slated to produce this picture, Garson Kanin was to direct, and Irene Dunne and Cary Grant were to play the leads. In Dec 1940, a news item reported that Ginger Rogers would replace Irene Dunne, who had to withdraw because of prior commitments. In May 1941, a news item noted that Ruth Warrick had been cast as "Ellen," the female lead. An early Jul 1941 news item then announced that Jane Wyatt was assigned the part of "Ellen" after Dorothy Comingore was suspended for refusing the role. In mid-Jul, contract player Dennis O'Keefe was suspended by RKO for refusing to appear as "Jim," the male lead, because he felt that the part was inconsequential. Two days later, a news item announced that Peter Lind Hayes would replace O'Keefe, but O'Keefe appears as "Jim" in the released film. A Jun 1941 news item adds that Tay Garnett was taking over from producer Erich Pommer, who was leaving the studio because of illness. According to 1944 news items in HR , writer Harold Kingston filed a piracy suit against RKO in federal court, charging that the studio used his play Cocktail Waves as a basis for this film. The suit was later dropped. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 Nov 1941.
---
Daily Variety
23 Oct 1941.
---
Film Daily
28 Oct 1941.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Nov 40
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 40
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jun 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 41
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jul 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 41
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 41
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 44
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Nov 41
p. 343.
New York Times
24 Oct 41
p. 27.
Variety
29 Oct 41
p. 9.
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 December 1941
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 23 October 1941
Production Date:
mid June--mid July 1941
Copyright Claimant:
RKO-Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 October 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10868
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
66
Length(in feet):
5,950
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7472
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Advertising executive Jim Craig pays more attention to his client, Fred Stonebraker, than to his wife Ellen. Upon arriving home from work late one evening, Jim discovers that they have an unexpected houseguest, Randy Bloodworth, an old friend of Ellen's. The overbearing Randy insists on dancing the night away with Ellen at the inn, while Jim watches, thoroughly bored. Returning home exhausted, Jim is awakened early the next morning by Randy, who is pounding on the bedroom door, eager to keep his golf date with Ellen. When Randy becomes so engrossed in his game that he misses his flight, he decides to stay another night. Brimming with energy, Randy closes down all the nightclubs and then insists on cooking a late- night dinner for Jim and Ellen. Randy's boisterousness makes allies out of Jim and Ellen, who look forward to a quiet night together after their guest leaves the next day. At the office that morning, when Jim unexpectedly accepts his wife's phone call, the much- married Fred observes that matrimony and business don't mix. Fred's words of wisdom prove prophetic, for when Jim is forced to cancel his date with Ellen to attend Fred's company bowling tournament that night, she spitefully invites Randy to stay longer. When the friend that Randy was planning to visit notifies him that he is leaving town, Randy decides to stay with the Craigs indefinitely, prompting Jim and Ellen to resort to drastic measures to get rid of him. Ellen's plan to dismiss their maid, Anna, backfires when Randy, rather than offering to depart, decides to clean house and floods the kitchen. Jim then decides to tell ... +


Advertising executive Jim Craig pays more attention to his client, Fred Stonebraker, than to his wife Ellen. Upon arriving home from work late one evening, Jim discovers that they have an unexpected houseguest, Randy Bloodworth, an old friend of Ellen's. The overbearing Randy insists on dancing the night away with Ellen at the inn, while Jim watches, thoroughly bored. Returning home exhausted, Jim is awakened early the next morning by Randy, who is pounding on the bedroom door, eager to keep his golf date with Ellen. When Randy becomes so engrossed in his game that he misses his flight, he decides to stay another night. Brimming with energy, Randy closes down all the nightclubs and then insists on cooking a late- night dinner for Jim and Ellen. Randy's boisterousness makes allies out of Jim and Ellen, who look forward to a quiet night together after their guest leaves the next day. At the office that morning, when Jim unexpectedly accepts his wife's phone call, the much- married Fred observes that matrimony and business don't mix. Fred's words of wisdom prove prophetic, for when Jim is forced to cancel his date with Ellen to attend Fred's company bowling tournament that night, she spitefully invites Randy to stay longer. When the friend that Randy was planning to visit notifies him that he is leaving town, Randy decides to stay with the Craigs indefinitely, prompting Jim and Ellen to resort to drastic measures to get rid of him. Ellen's plan to dismiss their maid, Anna, backfires when Randy, rather than offering to depart, decides to clean house and floods the kitchen. Jim then decides to tell their guest to leave, but his resolve fails when Randy expresses his undying allegiance to the family. Next, Ellen sends her husband to wait for her at the inn while she plots to get rid of Randy by telling him that Jim has gone to Chicago on business. At the inn, Jim sees Fred, whose innuendoes arouse Jim's jealousy and send him scurrying home. Hiding in the bedroom, Jim listens as Ellen scolds their dog, Junior, and believing that she is rebuking Randy for making advances to her, he becomes jealous. When Ellen enters the room, he accuses her of infidelity, and she pushes him out the window. Returning to the inn, Jim rejoins Fred, who has met a glamorous blonde on her way to Reno for a divorce. Inebriated, Fred and the blonde decide to go to Jim's room to cheer him up. Meanwhile, Ellen, feeling guilty, drives to the inn, and when she sees the blonde in Jim's room, she speeds home, calls a cab to take her to the train station and begins to pack her bags. When Jim, Fred and the blonde arrive at the house to explain the situation to Ellen, their arguing awakens Randy. Recognizing the blonde as his old dancing partner, Gloria, Randy cranks up the phonograph and begins dancing with her. In the clamour, Jim and Ellen reconcile and run outside to instruct the waiting cab to take them to the inn for a peaceful night's sleep. They are followed by Junior, dragging his kennel behind him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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