The Magnificent Dope (1942)

84 mins | Comedy | 1942

Director:

Walter Lang

Writer:

George Seaton

Producer:

William Perlberg

Cinematographer:

Peverell Marley

Editor:

Barbara McLean

Production Designers:

Richard Day, Wiard B. Ihnen

Production Company:

Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Lazy Galahad , Strictly Dynamite and The Magnificent Jerk . A 24 Jul 1941 HR news item stated that a picture entitled The Beautiful Dope , starring George Montgomery and Mary Beth Hughes, was to be scripted by Walter Bullock and produced by Ralph Dietrich, but it seems unlikely that the item was referring to this picture. A 27 Apr 1942 HR news item noted that Twentieth Century-Fox had changed the picture's title from The Magnificent Jerk to The Magnificent Stupe , due to "Hays Office objection." The film's file in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, however, does not contain any complaints by the PCA about the word "jerk" in either the title or dialogue.
       A 23 May 1941 HR news item reported that SEP was going to publish a serialization of Joseph Schrank's original screen story, entitled "Lazy Galahad," which he was to rewrite in novel form. The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, contained at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, do not indicate that Schrank rewrote his story or that it appeared in SEP , however. The news item also stated that Nunnally Johnson was originally scheduled to produce the picture, as well as write the screenplay. In Jul 1941, HR announced that Allan Scott was working on the screenplay, but the extent of his contribution to the finished film, along with Johnson's, has not been confirmed. An 8 Aug 1941 HR news item asserted that the studio was trying ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Lazy Galahad , Strictly Dynamite and The Magnificent Jerk . A 24 Jul 1941 HR news item stated that a picture entitled The Beautiful Dope , starring George Montgomery and Mary Beth Hughes, was to be scripted by Walter Bullock and produced by Ralph Dietrich, but it seems unlikely that the item was referring to this picture. A 27 Apr 1942 HR news item noted that Twentieth Century-Fox had changed the picture's title from The Magnificent Jerk to The Magnificent Stupe , due to "Hays Office objection." The film's file in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, however, does not contain any complaints by the PCA about the word "jerk" in either the title or dialogue.
       A 23 May 1941 HR news item reported that SEP was going to publish a serialization of Joseph Schrank's original screen story, entitled "Lazy Galahad," which he was to rewrite in novel form. The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, contained at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, do not indicate that Schrank rewrote his story or that it appeared in SEP , however. The news item also stated that Nunnally Johnson was originally scheduled to produce the picture, as well as write the screenplay. In Jul 1941, HR announced that Allan Scott was working on the screenplay, but the extent of his contribution to the finished film, along with Johnson's, has not been confirmed. An 8 Aug 1941 HR news item asserted that the studio was trying to sign Barton MacLane for a role in the picture. According to a 3 Apr 1942 HR news item, Iris Adrian was cast in the picture, but her appearance in the finished film has not been confirmed. HR news items also noted that production on the picture was shut down from 17 Mar to 30 Mar 1942 after Henry Fonda broke his finger while operating a tractor at home. Production on the picture resumed when Fonda began wearing smaller splints, which could be hidden from the camera. According to HR , some scenes were shot on location in Sherwood Forest, CA. Fonda and Don Ameche starred in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story on 28 Sep 1942. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Jun 42
p. 9.
Daily Variety
29 May 42
p. 3, 9
Film Daily
4 Jun 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 41
pp. 1-2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 41
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Feb 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 42
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Mar 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 42
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
15 Jan 1941.
---
Motion Picture Daily
29 May 1942.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
30 May 42
p. 686.
New York Times
3 Jul 42
p. 12.
Variety
3 Jun 42
p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Dir of pub
STAND INS
Stand-in for Don Ameche
SOURCES
SONGS
"Shortnin' Bread," words and music by Jacques Wolfe, based on a traditional folk song.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Strictly Dynamite
The Magnificent Jerk
Lazy Galahad
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 3 July 1942
Production Date:
23 February--16 March 1942
30 March--16 April 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 June 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11476
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in feet):
7,483
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8239
SYNOPSIS

Energetic opportunist Dwight Dawson teaches a high-powered system that promises to turn his pupils into successful businessmen. His own business is suffering due to lack of enrollment, however, and Dwight and his partner, Horace Hunter, are despondent until the publicity director, Claire Harris, who is also Dwight's fiancée, suggests sponsoring a contest to find the biggest failure in the United States. They announce a prize of five hundred dollars plus enrollment in the course, hoping that the ensuing publicity will popularize the Dawson system. After receiving thousands of entries, they select Thadeus Winship Page, a small-town man who rents out fishing boats during the summer. Tad travels from Upper White Eddy, Vermont to New York City to collect his prize money, with which he intends to buy a fire-engine for his hometown. Tad, who is content with his relaxed lifestyle, does not want to take Dwight's course, and so Dwight, who needs the publicity, asks Claire to show him the glamour of big-city life. During the evening, Tad falls in love with Claire and agrees to take Dwight's classes in order to be near her. As time passes, Claire realizes that the gentle Tad is not at all a "jerk," as she and Dwight had dubbed him. Tad confesses that he is in love, but because he is too shy to tell Claire the whole truth, he tells her that the object of his affections is a hometown girl named "Hazel." Claire informs Dwight about the confession, and Dwight plays on Tad's feelings, telling him that he must become a success in order to give Hazel comfort and security. Tad ... +


Energetic opportunist Dwight Dawson teaches a high-powered system that promises to turn his pupils into successful businessmen. His own business is suffering due to lack of enrollment, however, and Dwight and his partner, Horace Hunter, are despondent until the publicity director, Claire Harris, who is also Dwight's fiancée, suggests sponsoring a contest to find the biggest failure in the United States. They announce a prize of five hundred dollars plus enrollment in the course, hoping that the ensuing publicity will popularize the Dawson system. After receiving thousands of entries, they select Thadeus Winship Page, a small-town man who rents out fishing boats during the summer. Tad travels from Upper White Eddy, Vermont to New York City to collect his prize money, with which he intends to buy a fire-engine for his hometown. Tad, who is content with his relaxed lifestyle, does not want to take Dwight's course, and so Dwight, who needs the publicity, asks Claire to show him the glamour of big-city life. During the evening, Tad falls in love with Claire and agrees to take Dwight's classes in order to be near her. As time passes, Claire realizes that the gentle Tad is not at all a "jerk," as she and Dwight had dubbed him. Tad confesses that he is in love, but because he is too shy to tell Claire the whole truth, he tells her that the object of his affections is a hometown girl named "Hazel." Claire informs Dwight about the confession, and Dwight plays on Tad's feelings, telling him that he must become a success in order to give Hazel comfort and security. Tad succumbs to Dwight's pressure and attends classes, but soon decides to quit when he learns that Claire is also in love, although she does not get a chance to tell him that her beau is Dwight. Dwight, who has learned from Tad that Claire is "Hazel," convinces him that he must work to win Claire away from her boyfriend, whom Dwight says is short, fat and incompetent. As Tad studies harder, various magazines begin to cover his progress, and enrollment at the school increases. For a big story for Now Magazine , Dwight decides that Tad must obtain a job, and has Claire get him a job selling life insurance. Rather than tell Tad that he has the job, however, Dwight insists that he interview for it so that he will be persuaded that he won the job through Dawson strategies. Tad's enthusiasm wanes as he cannot sell any policies, and in order to forestall his quitting before the magazine article comes out, Dwight arranges for a business friend, Frank Mitchell, to order a big policy. Unknown to Tad or Claire, Frank has a high blood pressure condition that has prevented him from passing the necessary physical for four previous policies he has tried to buy. That evening, Tad proposes to Claire, and when she tells him that although she thinks she loves him, she is engaged to Dwight, Tad mistakenly believes that she has been deliberately deceiving him. The next day, Tad also learns about Frank's condition, but uses his unique relaxation techniques to lower Frank's blood pressure so that he can pass the physical and purchase the policy. Tad then goes to the school's office, where he overhears Claire castigating Dwight for treating him so shabbily. When Tad hears Claire declare her love for him, he slips out and picks up the fire-engine that he has purchased with his commission on Frank's policy. Tad meets Claire outside the office, and the happy couple drive off in the fire engine. Soon after, Dwight becomes a successful instructor of a relaxation class, using methods he learned from Tad. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.