Beating the Game (1921)

Melodrama | August 1921

Writer:

Charles Kenyon

Cinematographer:

Ernest Miller

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Goldwyn Pictures
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HISTORY

News items in the 5 Mar 1921 Camera and 19 Mar 1921 Motion Picture News stated that principal photography was scheduled to begin on St. Patrick’s Day (17 Mar 1921), following lead actor Tom Moore’s return from his honeymoon in Honolulu, HI. Although the 19 Mar 1921 Camera stated that production would be delayed until 24 Mar 1921, the following week’s issue claimed that it had begun on 4 Mar 1921.
       According to the 23 Apr 1921 Motion Picture News, leading lady Helene Chadwick had been assigned to another project, and was replaced by Hazel Daly. One week later, the 30 Apr 1921 issue stated that Moore and director Victor Schertzinger were filming a “picnic scene” in Santa Monica Canyon on the outskirts of Los Angeles, CA. The 7 May 1921 Motion Picture News noted that a “small town street” had been constructed on the Goldwyn Pictures studio lot in Culver City, CA. That same day, Camera reported that production had been completed the previous week.
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News items in the 5 Mar 1921 Camera and 19 Mar 1921 Motion Picture News stated that principal photography was scheduled to begin on St. Patrick’s Day (17 Mar 1921), following lead actor Tom Moore’s return from his honeymoon in Honolulu, HI. Although the 19 Mar 1921 Camera stated that production would be delayed until 24 Mar 1921, the following week’s issue claimed that it had begun on 4 Mar 1921.
       According to the 23 Apr 1921 Motion Picture News, leading lady Helene Chadwick had been assigned to another project, and was replaced by Hazel Daly. One week later, the 30 Apr 1921 issue stated that Moore and director Victor Schertzinger were filming a “picnic scene” in Santa Monica Canyon on the outskirts of Los Angeles, CA. The 7 May 1921 Motion Picture News noted that a “small town street” had been constructed on the Goldwyn Pictures studio lot in Culver City, CA. That same day, Camera reported that production had been completed the previous week.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
5 Mar 1921
p. 8
Camera
19 Mar 1921
p. 4
Camera
26 Mar 1921
p. 4
Camera
7 May 1921
p. 4
Camera
27 Aug 1921
p. 6
Camera
3 Sep 1921
p. 5
Exhibitors Trade Review
24 Sep 1921
p. 1168
Motion Picture News
19 Mar 1921
p. 2079
Motion Picture News
23 Apr 1921
p. 2699
Motion Picture News
30 Apr 1921
p. 2808
Motion Picture News
7 May 1921
p. 2940
Motion Picture News
27 Aug 1921
p. 1073
Motion Picture News
3 Sep 1921
p. 1250
Motion Picture News
17 Sep 1921
p. 1490, 1545
Moving Picture World
24 Sep 1921
p. 448
Variety
23 Sep 1921
p. 42
Wid's Daily
28 Jun 1921
p. 9
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1921
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: late Aug 1921; New York opening: week of 4 Sep 1921
Production Date:
4 Mar--late Apr 1921
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Goldwyn Pictures
27 July 1921
LP16790
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,058
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

"Fancy Charlie," an expert safecracker, gains entrance to the apartment of amateur criminologist G. B. Lawson and mistakenly assumes that he has robbed a member of his own profession. Lawson, who believes in honor among thieves, tests Charlie by giving him $1,000 with instructions to establish an honest business in the small town of Plumfield. At the end of one year, they plan to divide the profits. Charlie forms a partnership with storekeeper Jules Fanchette, and falls in love with their bookkeeper, Nellie Brown. At the end of the year, Charlie decides to abandon his life of crime and offers to return Lawson's investment, but the criminologist refuses the money. When Charlie is nominated as a candidate for mayor, he publicly admits to his sordid past. However, his confession is met with cheers from the public and an endorsement from Lawson, who reveals himself to be a U.S. senator. Charlie wins the election and settles down to a happy life with ...

More Less

"Fancy Charlie," an expert safecracker, gains entrance to the apartment of amateur criminologist G. B. Lawson and mistakenly assumes that he has robbed a member of his own profession. Lawson, who believes in honor among thieves, tests Charlie by giving him $1,000 with instructions to establish an honest business in the small town of Plumfield. At the end of one year, they plan to divide the profits. Charlie forms a partnership with storekeeper Jules Fanchette, and falls in love with their bookkeeper, Nellie Brown. At the end of the year, Charlie decides to abandon his life of crime and offers to return Lawson's investment, but the criminologist refuses the money. When Charlie is nominated as a candidate for mayor, he publicly admits to his sordid past. However, his confession is met with cheers from the public and an endorsement from Lawson, who reveals himself to be a U.S. senator. Charlie wins the election and settles down to a happy life with Nellie.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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