Wings of the Morning (1937)

87 mins | Drama | 19 February 1937

Producer:

Robert T. Kane

Editor:

James B. Clark

Production Designer:

W. Ralph Brinton

Production Company:

New World Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Wings of the Morning was the first film of New World Pictures, Ltd., which was a British subsidiary of Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp., and marked Robert T. Kane's first production in England for Twentieth Century-Fox. According to Lib , the film's cost was $500,000. According to IP , the film was made at the new Denham Studios, which were built on an old estate previously owned for generations by a once-wealthy family. The estate included lavish grounds and parks, and the river Coine flowed through it. Scenes were shot in Ireland and London, and at Epsom Downs racetrack. The picture was the first Technicolor film produced in England and also was French actress Annabella's first English language film. (In 1934, she came to Hollywood to star in Caravane , Fox's French language version of Caravan .) A modern source states that William Burnside, the assistant to the producer, taught Annabella English, and information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library states that a "Miss Downson" was hired to help Annabella perfect her English and her diction.
       Glenn Tryon is listed as director in HR production charts until 29 Jun 1936, when Harold Schuster's name first appears. According to modern sources, Tryon directed some location shooting in Ireland and the filming of the Derby before he had a disagreement with Kane and was replaced by Schuster. Wings of the Morning was Schuster's first credited film as director. Earlier, he had been an editor with Fox and had lost an opportunity to direct in the early 1930s when ... More Less

Wings of the Morning was the first film of New World Pictures, Ltd., which was a British subsidiary of Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp., and marked Robert T. Kane's first production in England for Twentieth Century-Fox. According to Lib , the film's cost was $500,000. According to IP , the film was made at the new Denham Studios, which were built on an old estate previously owned for generations by a once-wealthy family. The estate included lavish grounds and parks, and the river Coine flowed through it. Scenes were shot in Ireland and London, and at Epsom Downs racetrack. The picture was the first Technicolor film produced in England and also was French actress Annabella's first English language film. (In 1934, she came to Hollywood to star in Caravane , Fox's French language version of Caravan .) A modern source states that William Burnside, the assistant to the producer, taught Annabella English, and information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library states that a "Miss Downson" was hired to help Annabella perfect her English and her diction.
       Glenn Tryon is listed as director in HR production charts until 29 Jun 1936, when Harold Schuster's name first appears. According to modern sources, Tryon directed some location shooting in Ireland and the filming of the Derby before he had a disagreement with Kane and was replaced by Schuster. Wings of the Morning was Schuster's first credited film as director. Earlier, he had been an editor with Fox and had lost an opportunity to direct in the early 1930s when Chase Manhattan took over the company. In 1935, Schuster directed additional scenes in Spring Tonic (see above) and was scheduled to direct Fly by Night , but before production began, Fox merged with Twentieth Century Pictures, and the new studio head, Darryl Zanuck , cancelled that film.
       According to a HR news item, the Technicolor processing was done in Hollywood, as was the editing, which Schuster oversaw. The opening credits listing John McCormack reads "Introducing the famous Irish tenor." McCormack sang three songs in the film. According to the screen credits, racing commentator E. V. H. Emmett appeared "By Courtesy of the Gaumont-British News." The well-known jockey Steve Donoghue played himself. Henry Fonda, who made the first outdoor Technicolor film the year before, The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (see above), met his future wife Frances Seymour Brokaw during the shooting, according to Lib . Fonda was loaned by Walter Wanger for the production. HR production charts list the following additional cast members: Anthony Bushell, Niall McGinnis, Dorothy Dewhurst, John Hepworth and Edana Rubinstein. Their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. According to modern sources, Evelyn Ankers also was in the film. Modern sources state that the working title was The Sport of Kings . A 1919 Fox Film Corp. production with the same title was not based on the same source. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Feb 1937.
---
Daily Variety
29 Jan 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Feb 37
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 36
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 36
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 36
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 36
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 36
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 36
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 37
p. 4.
International Photographer
Dec 36
p. 8, 13, 27-28, 30
Liberty
13 Feb 1937.
---
Motion Picture Herald
20 Mar 37
p. 52, 55
New Statesman and Nation
22 May 1937.
---
New York Times
12 Mar 37
p. 19.
People's World
3 Oct 1936.
---
People's World
14 Aug 1937.
---
Variety
17 Mar 37
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Twentieth Century-Fox Film Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Script
PHOTOGRAPHY
Technicolor photog
Cam op
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus score
PRODUCTION MISC
COLOR PERSONNEL
Colour dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on two short stories by Donn Byrne in Destiny Bay (London, 1928).
SONGS
"Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms," words by Thomas Moore, music traditional
"Killarney," words by Edmund Falconer, music Michael William Balfe
"At the Dawning of the Day," traditional.
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 February 1937
Production Date:
mid June--mid August 1936 at Denham Studios, England
Copyright Claimants:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp. Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Dates:
18 January 1937 18 February 1937
Copyright Numbers:
LP7825 LP7221
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
87
Length(in feet):
7,500
Length(in reels):
9
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
2992
SYNOPSIS

In 1890, Lord Clontarf gives gypsy king Mairik a glen called Destiny Bay on his Irish estate to be a haven for gypsies forever and marries Mairik's daughter Marie, who suffers the snubbing of Clontarf's friends. After Clontarf dies from a riding fall, Marie goes south with the gypsies because a fortune-teller predicts that her mixed marriage will curse three generations. Some fifty years later in Spain, Marie's great-granddaughter Maria, the Duchess of Leyra, is engaged to Don Diego, the Duke of Montreal. Marie returns to Destiny Bay because of the rebellion in Spain and sends for Maria, who arrives dressed as a boy to get safely across the frontier. She trades Marie's prize horse, Wings of the Morning, without knowing the horse's value, to Kerry Gilfallen, a Canadian visiting his cousin, Sir Valentine MacFarland, Lord Clontarf's cousin who knew Marie who he was young. When Maria learns her mistake, she tries to retrieve the horse, but Wings escapes. Maria, still dressed as a boy, and Kerry find the horse in the dense fog by the cliffs, and Kerry insists that they spend the night in a barn. In the morning, when Maria refuses to swim, Kerry removes her shirt, which embarrasses them both. Kerry becomes Wings's trainer for the Derby at Epsom Downs and falls in love with Maria, but when Don Diego arrives and Kerry learns of Maria's engagement, he decides to return to Canada after the race. Although Kerry has hired famed jockey Steve Donoghue to ride his own horse, Destiny Bay, when Wings's jockey is rejected, Kerry has Donoghue ride Wings because Marie, who is near death, ... +


In 1890, Lord Clontarf gives gypsy king Mairik a glen called Destiny Bay on his Irish estate to be a haven for gypsies forever and marries Mairik's daughter Marie, who suffers the snubbing of Clontarf's friends. After Clontarf dies from a riding fall, Marie goes south with the gypsies because a fortune-teller predicts that her mixed marriage will curse three generations. Some fifty years later in Spain, Marie's great-granddaughter Maria, the Duchess of Leyra, is engaged to Don Diego, the Duke of Montreal. Marie returns to Destiny Bay because of the rebellion in Spain and sends for Maria, who arrives dressed as a boy to get safely across the frontier. She trades Marie's prize horse, Wings of the Morning, without knowing the horse's value, to Kerry Gilfallen, a Canadian visiting his cousin, Sir Valentine MacFarland, Lord Clontarf's cousin who knew Marie who he was young. When Maria learns her mistake, she tries to retrieve the horse, but Wings escapes. Maria, still dressed as a boy, and Kerry find the horse in the dense fog by the cliffs, and Kerry insists that they spend the night in a barn. In the morning, when Maria refuses to swim, Kerry removes her shirt, which embarrasses them both. Kerry becomes Wings's trainer for the Derby at Epsom Downs and falls in love with Maria, but when Don Diego arrives and Kerry learns of Maria's engagement, he decides to return to Canada after the race. Although Kerry has hired famed jockey Steve Donoghue to ride his own horse, Destiny Bay, when Wings's jockey is rejected, Kerry has Donoghue ride Wings because Marie, who is near death, plans to use the prize money for Maria's dowry. Wings wins, but when an objection flag is raised, Don Diego tells Maria that he would be helpless without her money, and she sends him away. Wings is declared the winner, and Maria finds Kerry swimming, dives to him and announces that she wants to marry him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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