City Girl (1930)

68 mins | Drama | 16 February 1930

Director:

F. W. Murnau

Writer:

Cinematographer:

Ernest Palmer

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The 8 Dec 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced that the production starting date for Our Daily Bread, the film's working title, was 20 Aug 1928. Actor Warren Burke was part of the original cast, but was not listed in final credits. The film was shot on location in Pendleton, OR. F. W. Murnau was relieved of his directorial duties before completion of the film, and the subsequent ending, along with various "comic relief" scenes interjected throughout, were directed by A. F. "Buddy" Erickson. A sound version of City Girl was released in 1938 (see entry), which contained a few differences: Following the fight scene, the husband forces the beaten foreman to apologize to his wife and confess that all the advances were on his side. The sequence of the father shooting at his son is missing in the sound version. Much greater emphasis is placed upon the attempted seduction of the wife by the foreman and the father's antagonism in the sound adaptation. Some sources list the running time of the silent version as 8,217 ... More Less

The 8 Dec 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced that the production starting date for Our Daily Bread, the film's working title, was 20 Aug 1928. Actor Warren Burke was part of the original cast, but was not listed in final credits. The film was shot on location in Pendleton, OR. F. W. Murnau was relieved of his directorial duties before completion of the film, and the subsequent ending, along with various "comic relief" scenes interjected throughout, were directed by A. F. "Buddy" Erickson. A sound version of City Girl was released in 1938 (see entry), which contained a few differences: Following the fight scene, the husband forces the beaten foreman to apologize to his wife and confess that all the advances were on his side. The sequence of the father shooting at his son is missing in the sound version. Much greater emphasis is placed upon the attempted seduction of the wife by the foreman and the father's antagonism in the sound adaptation. Some sources list the running time of the silent version as 8,217 feet. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
8 Dec 1928
p. 50.
Film Daily
6 Apr 1930.
---
Variety
9 Apr 1930
p. 39.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Stage dir (sd versions)
Stage dir (sd versions)
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Settings
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Mud Turtle by Elliott Lester (New York, 20 Aug 1925).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Our Daily Bread
Release Date:
16 February 1930
Production Date:
began 20 August 1928
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
10 January 1930
Copyright Number:
LP984
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Talking seq and mus score by Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68
Length(in feet):
6,171
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Lem Tustine is the son of a Minnesota wheat farmer off for Chicago to sell his father's annual crop, and though caught in a falling market, he meets Kate, who is a waitress in the Windy City, and brings her home as his bride. His father, whose primary ties are to the land which he loves above all else, takes her for a fortune hunter and strongly resents her marriage to his son and belittles her character. Her repeated efforts to win his approval are unsuccessful. A hailstorm necessitates emergency night-harvesting of the crop, and in the confusion the foreman, Lem's brother, hurts his hand in a threshing machine. Coming to have his hand bandaged, he tries to force his attentions on Kate; and though she repulses him, the elder Tustine witnesses the struggle and informs Lem. The foreman threatens to pull out the workers unless Kate will leave with him; she agrees, thinking her marriage is a failure. Lem bests the foreman in a fight and is barely missed by his father's gunfire at the deserting workers. Realizing he has almost killed his son, Tustine relents, and Lem brings back his wife to a humbled and more tolerant ... +


Lem Tustine is the son of a Minnesota wheat farmer off for Chicago to sell his father's annual crop, and though caught in a falling market, he meets Kate, who is a waitress in the Windy City, and brings her home as his bride. His father, whose primary ties are to the land which he loves above all else, takes her for a fortune hunter and strongly resents her marriage to his son and belittles her character. Her repeated efforts to win his approval are unsuccessful. A hailstorm necessitates emergency night-harvesting of the crop, and in the confusion the foreman, Lem's brother, hurts his hand in a threshing machine. Coming to have his hand bandaged, he tries to force his attentions on Kate; and though she repulses him, the elder Tustine witnesses the struggle and informs Lem. The foreman threatens to pull out the workers unless Kate will leave with him; she agrees, thinking her marriage is a failure. Lem bests the foreman in a fight and is barely missed by his father's gunfire at the deserting workers. Realizing he has almost killed his son, Tustine relents, and Lem brings back his wife to a humbled and more tolerant father. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Rural


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.