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HISTORY

The 6 Mar 1909 Moving Picture World ran the following review: "A strong story of love and jealousy told by the Biograph people. The scene is laid in a boarding house where apparently a Sicilian had been encouraged in his attentions by one of the ladies until a musician appears on the scene. An engagement and preparations for a wedding follow. The jealous lover is sent away and goes to his room vowing vengeance. He makes an infernal machine which he conceals under the platform in such a way that when the priest steps upon a certain spot a revolver will be discharged in such a way that the bride will be killed. He goes back to his room, writes what he has done, drinks poison and falls dead. The paper is discovered and a policeman starts for the church. Alternate scenes are shown, the wedding party at the church, then the policeman running, falling and laming himself and finally going down perfectly unable to go any farther. A boy takes the message from his hands and rushes on. Meanwhile the wedding party has got to the point where the fatal step will be the next, when the boy rushes in and the bride is saved. The audience have their interest aroused to the highest pitch as these alternate pictures are shown, and there is a noticeable relaxing of nerves when the pistol is discharged and the bride is unhurt. The weakest scene is the last, where the wedding is consummated with very little apparent perturbation after such a narrow escape from death. There is no question about the intense interest this film excites, but there is ...

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The 6 Mar 1909 Moving Picture World ran the following review: "A strong story of love and jealousy told by the Biograph people. The scene is laid in a boarding house where apparently a Sicilian had been encouraged in his attentions by one of the ladies until a musician appears on the scene. An engagement and preparations for a wedding follow. The jealous lover is sent away and goes to his room vowing vengeance. He makes an infernal machine which he conceals under the platform in such a way that when the priest steps upon a certain spot a revolver will be discharged in such a way that the bride will be killed. He goes back to his room, writes what he has done, drinks poison and falls dead. The paper is discovered and a policeman starts for the church. Alternate scenes are shown, the wedding party at the church, then the policeman running, falling and laming himself and finally going down perfectly unable to go any farther. A boy takes the message from his hands and rushes on. Meanwhile the wedding party has got to the point where the fatal step will be the next, when the boy rushes in and the bride is saved. The audience have their interest aroused to the highest pitch as these alternate pictures are shown, and there is a noticeable relaxing of nerves when the pistol is discharged and the bride is unhurt. The weakest scene is the last, where the wedding is consummated with very little apparent perturbation after such a narrow escape from death. There is no question about the intense interest this film excites, but there is no applause.”
       Herbert Yost also worked under the name "David O'Brien .”

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 67
BPL
pp. 110-111
EMP
p. 15
LCMP
p. 4, column 1
LCPP
p. 167
Moving Picture World
20 Feb 1909
p. 191ta, 211ts, 218tl
Moving Picture World
6 Mar 1909
p. 268r
NYDM
27 Feb 1909
p. 14ta
NYDM
6 Mar 1909
p. 12r
The Daily Worker
p. 39
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 February 1909
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
American Mutoscope and Biograph Co.
26 February 1909
H123389
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
972
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

"At the Italian boarding house the male boarders were all smitten with the charms of Minnie, the landlady's pretty daughter, but she was of a poetic turn of mind and her soul soared above plebeianism and her aspirations were romantic. Most persistent among her suitors was Grigo, a coarse Sicilian, whose advances were odiously repulsive. The arrival at the boarding house from the old country of Giuseppe Cassella, the violinist, filled the void in her yearning heart. Romantic, poetic, and a talented musician, Giuseppe was indeed a desirable husband for Minnie. All this, of course, filled Grigo with bitter hatred and he vows vengeance, which you may be sure he will work with extreme subtlety. All preparations are made for the wedding, and when the day arrives, Grigo is ready for it. He has contrived an infernal machine with a pistol so arranged that its explosion means death to anyone standing in front of it. The little church is decorated in honor of the affair, and Grigo, with subterfuge, gets the sexton out, leaving the place to himself. Sawing a hole in front of the altar step, he places his weapon in such a position that one step forward by the priest would mean death to the bride kneeling in front. Grigo rushes back to his room, arriving just as the wedding party is leaving for the church. Here he becomes a victim of the frenzy of his mind, and appreciating the fact that the awful deed will be laid to him and his apprehension will be inevitable, he writes a gloating note and then takes poison. His fall is heard by the housemaid, who, discovering the note, gives ...

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"At the Italian boarding house the male boarders were all smitten with the charms of Minnie, the landlady's pretty daughter, but she was of a poetic turn of mind and her soul soared above plebeianism and her aspirations were romantic. Most persistent among her suitors was Grigo, a coarse Sicilian, whose advances were odiously repulsive. The arrival at the boarding house from the old country of Giuseppe Cassella, the violinist, filled the void in her yearning heart. Romantic, poetic, and a talented musician, Giuseppe was indeed a desirable husband for Minnie. All this, of course, filled Grigo with bitter hatred and he vows vengeance, which you may be sure he will work with extreme subtlety. All preparations are made for the wedding, and when the day arrives, Grigo is ready for it. He has contrived an infernal machine with a pistol so arranged that its explosion means death to anyone standing in front of it. The little church is decorated in honor of the affair, and Grigo, with subterfuge, gets the sexton out, leaving the place to himself. Sawing a hole in front of the altar step, he places his weapon in such a position that one step forward by the priest would mean death to the bride kneeling in front. Grigo rushes back to his room, arriving just as the wedding party is leaving for the church. Here he becomes a victim of the frenzy of his mind, and appreciating the fact that the awful deed will be laid to him and his apprehension will be inevitable, he writes a gloating note and then takes poison. His fall is heard by the housemaid, who, discovering the note, gives it to a policeman, who rushes madly to the church. Fate, however, seems to conspire, and the officer falls, breaking his ankle, just outside the church. A newsboy, seeing his plight, runs up, and the policeman directs him hurriedly to the church, where he arrives just in time to save the couple, who start back at his yell, for the priest had just made the step which fires the gun, but with no harm done. The priest gives thanks to God for their deliverance and proceeds with the wedding.”—20 Feb 1909 Moving Picture World

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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