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HISTORY

At the end of the opening credits, the following statement appears: "We wish to thank the following for their many creative contributions to this production: Jaeckel, Inc. for furs; Irene--for Miss Bennett's Wardrobe; Omar Kiam--for the Fashion Shows and Miss Vinson's Wardrobe; Max Factor--for Color Harmony Make-up; Sally Victor--for a great many of the hats; John-Frederics--for the hats and accessories in the Fall Fashion Forecast; Trabert & Hoeffer Inc. "Mauboussin Jewels" for the jewelry; I. Miller & Sons--for shoes; And the many others whose creative efforts have found expression in this motion picture." According to HR , Helen Taylor designed the clothes in the opening sequence and the lighting idea for at the Rayon Ball.
       This film was reviewed under the title Vogues of 1938 . It originally was to be titled Vogues of 1937 , but the year in the title was changed due to a late release date, according to a HR news item. The film had its preview on 2 Aug 1937 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. Reviews praised the quality of the color and predicted that the film would make Technicolor a box office asset. According to contemporary sources, Walter Wanger, who produced the first three-color Technicolor outdoors feature, The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (see above) planned this film more than two years earlier but waited until Technicolor was perfected before producing it. Contemporary sources note that samples of every cloth and fur were tested for their Technicolor reaction. According to the pressbook, production designer Alexander Toluboff had the idea to treat the background sets in grays and metallic hues to ... More Less

At the end of the opening credits, the following statement appears: "We wish to thank the following for their many creative contributions to this production: Jaeckel, Inc. for furs; Irene--for Miss Bennett's Wardrobe; Omar Kiam--for the Fashion Shows and Miss Vinson's Wardrobe; Max Factor--for Color Harmony Make-up; Sally Victor--for a great many of the hats; John-Frederics--for the hats and accessories in the Fall Fashion Forecast; Trabert & Hoeffer Inc. "Mauboussin Jewels" for the jewelry; I. Miller & Sons--for shoes; And the many others whose creative efforts have found expression in this motion picture." According to HR , Helen Taylor designed the clothes in the opening sequence and the lighting idea for at the Rayon Ball.
       This film was reviewed under the title Vogues of 1938 . It originally was to be titled Vogues of 1937 , but the year in the title was changed due to a late release date, according to a HR news item. The film had its preview on 2 Aug 1937 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. Reviews praised the quality of the color and predicted that the film would make Technicolor a box office asset. According to contemporary sources, Walter Wanger, who produced the first three-color Technicolor outdoors feature, The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (see above) planned this film more than two years earlier but waited until Technicolor was perfected before producing it. Contemporary sources note that samples of every cloth and fur were tested for their Technicolor reaction. According to the pressbook, production designer Alexander Toluboff had the idea to treat the background sets in grays and metallic hues to offset the foreground color. Models in the film included the Lucky Strike Girl, the Chesterfield Girl, the Lux Soap Girl and the Pepsodent Girl. Location shooting was done in New York City. Frances Langford is listed as a cast member in HR production charts, but her participation in the final film is doubtful. Toluboff received an Academy Award nomination for his work on the picture. The song "That Old Feeling" was also nominated. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Aug 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
7 Aug 37
p. 4.
Harrison's Reports
28 Aug 37
p. 139.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 35
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jan 37
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 37
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 37
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
5 Aug 37
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
7 Aug 37
p. 45.
New York Times
20 Aug 37
p. 21.
Variety
4 Aug 37
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Technicolor photog
Technicolor cam chief of prod
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des and executed by
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus comp
SOUND
DANCE
Cotton Club and Fall Show
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor color dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"That Old Feeling," music and lyrics by Lew Brown and Sammy Fain
"Lovely One," music by Manning Sherwin, lyrics by Frank Loesser
"Red Hot Heat" and "Fall Fashion Forecast," music and lyrics by Louis Alter and Paul F. Webster.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Vogues of 1938
Release Date:
17 September 1937
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 August 1937
Production Date:
15 March--late May 1937
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 September 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7381
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
108
Length(in feet):
10,203
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3485
SYNOPSIS

George Curson is the owner of the fashionable House of Curson on New York's Fifth Avenue. When Mrs. Van Klettering insists that her debutante daughter Wendy marry wealthy Henry Morgan because of the poor financial status of the family, Wendy requests that George not have her wedding dress delivered on time so that she can get out of the wedding. George refuses, and Wendy's subsequent absence at the wedding results in headlines which humiliate Morgan. He then brings a court injunction to prevent Wendy from modeling for the Curson fashion show because, he contends, that would embarrass him in public. Taking the court action as a dare, Wendy, with George as her escort, parades through the show wearing a selection of new fashions, but says that she is only a spectator. In retaliation, Morgan backs George's competitor, Prince Muratov, who tries to ruin the House of Curson by obtaining the Curson client list and buying the new Paris fashions first. George gives in to his wife Mary's wish that he back a show, Brockton's Vogues of 1938 , to give her a chance to perform again, but the show flops in Boston, and George returns to New York alone and in debt. After George refuses to sell his building to Morgan, Wendy proposes to Morgan to save George financially, but Morgan now refuses. George is able to ruin Muratov by copying his creations and having Wendy wear them wherever Muratov's clients go, so that the women will think their clothes are not originals. George still cannot get financing to save his business, so using the costumes, props and lights ... +


George Curson is the owner of the fashionable House of Curson on New York's Fifth Avenue. When Mrs. Van Klettering insists that her debutante daughter Wendy marry wealthy Henry Morgan because of the poor financial status of the family, Wendy requests that George not have her wedding dress delivered on time so that she can get out of the wedding. George refuses, and Wendy's subsequent absence at the wedding results in headlines which humiliate Morgan. He then brings a court injunction to prevent Wendy from modeling for the Curson fashion show because, he contends, that would embarrass him in public. Taking the court action as a dare, Wendy, with George as her escort, parades through the show wearing a selection of new fashions, but says that she is only a spectator. In retaliation, Morgan backs George's competitor, Prince Muratov, who tries to ruin the House of Curson by obtaining the Curson client list and buying the new Paris fashions first. George gives in to his wife Mary's wish that he back a show, Brockton's Vogues of 1938 , to give her a chance to perform again, but the show flops in Boston, and George returns to New York alone and in debt. After George refuses to sell his building to Morgan, Wendy proposes to Morgan to save George financially, but Morgan now refuses. George is able to ruin Muratov by copying his creations and having Wendy wear them wherever Muratov's clients go, so that the women will think their clothes are not originals. George still cannot get financing to save his business, so using the costumes, props and lights from Brockton's show, he puts on a fall extravaganza that makes his creditors anxious to loan him money again. Although Morgan tries to close the show, Muratov, who, to pay his debt of honor to George, works as the doorman, locks Morgan in an elevator. At the close of the show, George learns that Mary, to whom he has been faithful despite Wendy's flirtations, has divorced him in Reno to pursue an acting career. He now proposes to Wendy and she accepts. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.