Quick Millions (1931)

69-70 or 72 mins | Drama | 3 May 1931

Director:

Rowland Brown

Cinematographer:

Joseph August

Editor:

Harold Schuster

Production Designer:

Duncan Cramer

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Sky Line . Skyline was the title of another Fox film of 1931 (see below) and the working title of a third Fox film of 1931, Delicious (see above). This was Rowland Brown's first film as a director. Previously he was a newspaper reporter and contract writer for Fox. According to Var , Brown received a bonus of $1,000 for "continuity and cutting." This was George Raft's first film. According to a NYT news item, Brown, "searching for a menace with sex appeal," saw Raft in the Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood and put him in the film the next day. A NYT article in Nov 1936 on the subject of the style of early sound films praises Quick Millions as contributing to a new cinematic style that cut down on dialogue: "The rapid rhythm of [ Quick Million 's] continuity was built up from short scenes; the dialogue was correspondingly laconic. Each scene quietly thrust home a point of character or plot--and stopped." The 1939 Twentieth Century-Fox film entitled Quick Millions bears no resemblance to this ... More Less

The working title of this film was Sky Line . Skyline was the title of another Fox film of 1931 (see below) and the working title of a third Fox film of 1931, Delicious (see above). This was Rowland Brown's first film as a director. Previously he was a newspaper reporter and contract writer for Fox. According to Var , Brown received a bonus of $1,000 for "continuity and cutting." This was George Raft's first film. According to a NYT news item, Brown, "searching for a menace with sex appeal," saw Raft in the Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood and put him in the film the next day. A NYT article in Nov 1936 on the subject of the style of early sound films praises Quick Millions as contributing to a new cinematic style that cut down on dialogue: "The rapid rhythm of [ Quick Million 's] continuity was built up from short scenes; the dialogue was correspondingly laconic. Each scene quietly thrust home a point of character or plot--and stopped." The 1939 Twentieth Century-Fox film entitled Quick Millions bears no resemblance to this film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
19 Apr 31
p. 10.
HF
21 Feb 31
p. 24.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Jan 31
p. 44.
Motion Picture Herald
4 Apr 31
pp. 25-28, p. 36.
New York Times
18 Apr 31
p. 17.
New York Times
26 Apr 31
p. 5.
New York Times
30 Oct 1932.
---
New York Times
29 Nov 1936.
---
Variety
22 Apr 31
p. 18.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sky Line
Release Date:
3 May 1931
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 April 1931
Production Date:
26 January--late February 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
11 March 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2087
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69-70 or 72
Length(in feet):
6,286
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

While he works temporarily as a truck driver, Daniel J. "Bugs" Raymond thinks of various "angles" to get rich. After offering to protect garage owners for seventy-five dollars a week, he destroys cars parked on the street so that car owners will use the garages more frequently. Bugs next becomes partners with Nails Markey, who, with his father, owns 200 produce trucks. From 1925 until 1931, through intimidation, threats and murder, they organize all the trucks in the city. After Bugs and his gang arrange a banquet for prominent citizens and then send thugs to hold up the guests, they collect enough evidence of wrongdoing among the guests to keep them from interfering with their racket. Bugs, who is dissatisfied that his mistress, Daisy de Lisle, is not more "ladylike," meets Dorothy Stone, an attractive, college-educated granddaughter of a former governor and the sister to financier and builder John L. Stone. Through sabotage of machinery, Bugs's gang coerces Stone into paying them to supply trucks for the building of his new tower. When Stone stands to lose a quarter of a million dollars because the tower will not be completed on time, he accepts Bugs's offer to see that it is finished ahead of schedule if Bugs is appointed director of the firm. Now that he has established himself in the "legitimate" business world, Bugs tries to pay off Daisy to go to Europe, and he keeps away from his gang as he spends more and more time with Dorothy, playing billiards and golf and going to the opera. Nails then decides to take over the gang, and he orders attacks on the ... +


While he works temporarily as a truck driver, Daniel J. "Bugs" Raymond thinks of various "angles" to get rich. After offering to protect garage owners for seventy-five dollars a week, he destroys cars parked on the street so that car owners will use the garages more frequently. Bugs next becomes partners with Nails Markey, who, with his father, owns 200 produce trucks. From 1925 until 1931, through intimidation, threats and murder, they organize all the trucks in the city. After Bugs and his gang arrange a banquet for prominent citizens and then send thugs to hold up the guests, they collect enough evidence of wrongdoing among the guests to keep them from interfering with their racket. Bugs, who is dissatisfied that his mistress, Daisy de Lisle, is not more "ladylike," meets Dorothy Stone, an attractive, college-educated granddaughter of a former governor and the sister to financier and builder John L. Stone. Through sabotage of machinery, Bugs's gang coerces Stone into paying them to supply trucks for the building of his new tower. When Stone stands to lose a quarter of a million dollars because the tower will not be completed on time, he accepts Bugs's offer to see that it is finished ahead of schedule if Bugs is appointed director of the firm. Now that he has established himself in the "legitimate" business world, Bugs tries to pay off Daisy to go to Europe, and he keeps away from his gang as he spends more and more time with Dorothy, playing billiards and golf and going to the opera. Nails then decides to take over the gang, and he orders attacks on the city's food industry. When a radio commentator lashes out against the racketeers, Nails hires Bugs's bodyguard, Jimmy Kirk, to kill the "loud speaker." Headlines connect Bugs with the murder of the radio commentator, and Bugs has Jimmy killed. After the dedication of the tower, Stone and other businessmen tell the district attorney that they are through with graft. Bugs, whom Dorothy, now engaged to another man, has rejected, decides to become a hoodlum again and arranges to hijack Dorothy during her wedding the next day. Daisy suspects that Nails, who has tried to proposition her, is plotting against Bugs, but she does not warn him. On the way to the wedding, Nails shoots Bugs and throws his top hat in front of the church. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.