Successful Failure (1934)

62 mins | Comedy-drama | 15 October 1934

Director:

Arthur Lubin

Writer:

Marion Orth

Cinematographer:

Jerome Ash

Editor:

Jack Ogilvie

Production Designer:

Ernest R. Hickson

Production Company:

Monogram Pictures Corp.
Full page view
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Oct 1934
---
Daily Variety
20 Jul 1934
p. 5
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1934
p. 3
Daily Variety
17 Oct 1934
p. 3
Film Daily
2 Oct 1934
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 1934
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
5 Oct 1934
p. 17
Motion Picture Herald
6 Oct 1934
p. 62
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Trem Carr, Vice President; A George Yohalem Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Jerry Ash
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
E. R. Hickson
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Your Uncle William" by Michael Kane in The Saturday Evening Post (publication date undetermined).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 October 1934
Production Date:
20 Jul--28 Jul 1934
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Monogram Pictures Corp.
9 October 1934
LP5060
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
295
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Ellery Cushing, a veteran newspaper reporter and aspiring humor columnist, gets little respect from his wife and two older children, Ruth and Bob, who nag him constantly to ask his hard-nosed boss for a raise. On the day that Ellery has promised to demand his raise, his editor, who has demoted him to an eye-straining copyreading job, fires him without ceremony. Ellery's humiliation incurs the ire of Phil, Ruth's former boyfriend, and inspires him to quit his reporting job in protest. Confident that he can sell Ellery's "Headline Humor" column, Phil convinces Ellery to keep his dismissal a secret from his family. While pretending to be at work, Ellery and Phil slave over "Headline Humor" on a park bench and finally sell it to a radio station as the "Uncle Dudley" show. Not recognizing Ellery's voice on the radio, Mrs. Cushing and the children join the many fans of the "Uncle Dudley" show, which features amusing insights into the foibles of family life. Although the show makes him a coveted local celebrity, Ellery finds time to counsel Ruth, who had left Phil in favor of a wealthy playboy, about the importance of maintaining a good reputation. Just as the family discovers the truth about Ellery's firing, guillible Bob becomes involved in a Communist labor rally, which Ellery attends and disrupts with his own speech about loyalty and faith in the American way. After he is struck in the head by a labor agitator, Ellery is taken to the hospital, where his surprised but remorseful family begs his forgiveness, and a reformed Ruth reunites with ...

More Less

Ellery Cushing, a veteran newspaper reporter and aspiring humor columnist, gets little respect from his wife and two older children, Ruth and Bob, who nag him constantly to ask his hard-nosed boss for a raise. On the day that Ellery has promised to demand his raise, his editor, who has demoted him to an eye-straining copyreading job, fires him without ceremony. Ellery's humiliation incurs the ire of Phil, Ruth's former boyfriend, and inspires him to quit his reporting job in protest. Confident that he can sell Ellery's "Headline Humor" column, Phil convinces Ellery to keep his dismissal a secret from his family. While pretending to be at work, Ellery and Phil slave over "Headline Humor" on a park bench and finally sell it to a radio station as the "Uncle Dudley" show. Not recognizing Ellery's voice on the radio, Mrs. Cushing and the children join the many fans of the "Uncle Dudley" show, which features amusing insights into the foibles of family life. Although the show makes him a coveted local celebrity, Ellery finds time to counsel Ruth, who had left Phil in favor of a wealthy playboy, about the importance of maintaining a good reputation. Just as the family discovers the truth about Ellery's firing, guillible Bob becomes involved in a Communist labor rally, which Ellery attends and disrupts with his own speech about loyalty and faith in the American way. After he is struck in the head by a labor agitator, Ellery is taken to the hospital, where his surprised but remorseful family begs his forgiveness, and a reformed Ruth reunites with Phil.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Johnny O'Clock

This was the first film of producer Ed Nealis and well-known celebrity lawyer Jerry Gielser. The film also marked Robert Rossen's directorial debut, and the screen debut of actor ... >>

The Godfather

The film's opening title card reads: "Mario Puzo's The Godfather." While the first strains of a trumpet solo of Nino Rota's "Godfather" theme are heard on ... >>

Cannery Row

       The first attempt at a motion picture adaptation of John Steinbeck’s 1945 novel, Cannery Row, was made in the late 1940s. According to a news item ... >>

Stagecoach

The American folk songs adapted for the score included the traditional ballads "Lily Dale," "Rosa Lee," "Joe Bowers," "Joe the Wrangler," "She's More to Be Pitied Than Censured," "She ... >>

Dracula

Bela Lugosi created the role of Dracula onstage in the 5 Oct 1927 American premiere of Hamilton Deane's adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel. Lon Chaney was originally ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.