Adventure Girl (1934)

70 or 76 mins | Documentary, Adventure | 17 August 1934

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HISTORY

An onscreen foreword describes the film as a "reenactment of Miss Lowells' fantastic journeyings." The foreword acknowledges General Jorge Ubico, President of the Republic of Guatemala, without whose cooperation "this picture could not have been filmed; especially that fictional portion displaying the artistry of the untrained natives, none of whom had ever before faced a camera." It is not clear from viewing the film exactly which portions of the story were fictional. The film appears to have been shot without sound, with sound effects added in post-production. Intercut with the narrative are scenes showing native fauna, such as snakes, mongooses and weaver birds. Reviewers also mentioned Joan Lowell's battles with an octupus and shots of shark hunting, but these scenes were not seen in the viewed print. According to a FD news item, Gustav Brock hand-colored the fire sequence to give it more ... More Less

An onscreen foreword describes the film as a "reenactment of Miss Lowells' fantastic journeyings." The foreword acknowledges General Jorge Ubico, President of the Republic of Guatemala, without whose cooperation "this picture could not have been filmed; especially that fictional portion displaying the artistry of the untrained natives, none of whom had ever before faced a camera." It is not clear from viewing the film exactly which portions of the story were fictional. The film appears to have been shot without sound, with sound effects added in post-production. Intercut with the narrative are scenes showing native fauna, such as snakes, mongooses and weaver birds. Reviewers also mentioned Joan Lowell's battles with an octupus and shots of shark hunting, but these scenes were not seen in the viewed print. According to a FD news item, Gustav Brock hand-colored the fire sequence to give it more "realism." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
3 Aug 34
p. 8.
Film Daily
7 Aug 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 34
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Aug 34
p. 38.
New York Times
9 Aug 34
p. 14.
Variety
14 Aug 34
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Supv film ed
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Sd eng
Rec eng
PRODUCTION MISC
COLOR PERSONNEL
Hand-tinter of fire seq
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Cradle of the Deep by Joan Lowell (New York, 1920).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 August 1934
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor "High Fidelity" Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70 or 76
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Adventurer Joan Lowell, with her father, Nicholas Wagner, and two crew members, William Sawyer and Otto Siegler, sails from New York to the Caribbean in her 48-foot schooner Black Hawk . Soon after their departure, Joan and the crew battle a hurricane, which damages their mast and casts them to a shipwreck graveyard. As Bill and Otto lay claim to the mast of one of these abandoned boats, Joan and her father board an old gunrunner, where Joan discovers a one-hundred-year-old map to a lost jungle city and the hiding place of a giant sacred emerald. Afraid her superstitious sailor father will disapprove of her tampering with a dead man's belongings, Joan says nothing about her find but steers the schooner toward the lost city. Shortly afterward, however, she discovers that the boat's entire water supply was drained by the hurricane. Dying of thirst, Joan and Bill drift in a rowboat to an island where a native gives them life-saving water. When they reach the village near the lost city, Joan lies about her intentions to the local matriarch, Princess Maya, in order to obtain permission to explore. Maya reluctantly gives her consent but threatens Joan with death if she betrays her trust. Trailed by head villager Manola and his men, Joan, Bill and Maya use the old map to locate the Mayan ruins and the temple that houses the coveted emerald. With Bill's help, Joan diverts Maya and begins to scour for the emerald but is caught in the act. Captured and sentenced to burn alive for her misdeed, Joan is rescued at the last moment by Bill. ... +


Adventurer Joan Lowell, with her father, Nicholas Wagner, and two crew members, William Sawyer and Otto Siegler, sails from New York to the Caribbean in her 48-foot schooner Black Hawk . Soon after their departure, Joan and the crew battle a hurricane, which damages their mast and casts them to a shipwreck graveyard. As Bill and Otto lay claim to the mast of one of these abandoned boats, Joan and her father board an old gunrunner, where Joan discovers a one-hundred-year-old map to a lost jungle city and the hiding place of a giant sacred emerald. Afraid her superstitious sailor father will disapprove of her tampering with a dead man's belongings, Joan says nothing about her find but steers the schooner toward the lost city. Shortly afterward, however, she discovers that the boat's entire water supply was drained by the hurricane. Dying of thirst, Joan and Bill drift in a rowboat to an island where a native gives them life-saving water. When they reach the village near the lost city, Joan lies about her intentions to the local matriarch, Princess Maya, in order to obtain permission to explore. Maya reluctantly gives her consent but threatens Joan with death if she betrays her trust. Trailed by head villager Manola and his men, Joan, Bill and Maya use the old map to locate the Mayan ruins and the temple that houses the coveted emerald. With Bill's help, Joan diverts Maya and begins to scour for the emerald but is caught in the act. Captured and sentenced to burn alive for her misdeed, Joan is rescued at the last moment by Bill. As Manola and his men chase the escaping adventurers to their boat, Joan confesses her greed and vows never to be tempted by material wealth again. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.