Bulldog Drummond's Revenge (1938)

55 or 60 mins | Drama | 7 January 1938

Director:

Louis King

Writer:

Edward T. Lowe

Producer:

Stuart Walker

Cinematographer:

Harry Fischbeck

Editor:

Arthur Schmidt

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Robert Odell

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

For additional information on the Bulldog Drummond character, see the entries for Bulldog Drummond Escapes and Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back and consult the Series ... More Less

For additional information on the Bulldog Drummond character, see the entries for Bulldog Drummond Escapes and Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back and consult the Series Index. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Oct 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Dec 37
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Oct 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
2 Nov 37
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
6 Nov 37
p. 33.
New York Times
17 Dec 37
p. 33.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Return of Bulldog Drummond by H. C. "Sapper" McNeile (London, 1932).
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 January 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 December 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7722
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55 or 60
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3652
SYNOPSIS

While Capt. Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond listens in, Sumio Kanda informs Colonel Nielson of Scotland Yard that an attempt will be made to steal the highly explosive substance "hextonite" in transit. The inventor of the substance insists on transporting the substance himself, accompanied by his secretary, Draven Nogais. During the flight, Nogais kills the inventor and parachutes the substance out of the plane. He then removes an already severed hand, places his ring on it, leaves it in the plane and parachutes out of the airplane. Drummond happens to drive by the plane crash and retrieves the case of hextonite and the severed hand before Nogais and his accomplice arrive. Drummond takes the evidence home and from the initials on the suitcase determines the owner, and also surmises that the severed hand is several days old and is probably a plant. Suddenly the lights go out and the suitcase is stolen. Drummond, his servant Tenny, his fiancèe Phyllis Clavering and his friend Algy Longworth all board a train at Victoria Station. Nogais is also on this train disguised as a woman, and has put the hextonite in a bottle of bath crystals. Drummond and Algy find the dead body of Nogais' accomplice and realize that Nogais must be on the train. They meet with Nielson on the Dover Ferry and discover Nogais' disguise. Nogais takes Tenny and Phyllis hostage in their own compartment, but Drummond comes in and takes control. An alarm clock goes off suddenly and in the confusion Nogais escapes. Nielson shoots Nogais before he can set off the explosives, and Algy catches the container of hextonite, thereby ... +


While Capt. Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond listens in, Sumio Kanda informs Colonel Nielson of Scotland Yard that an attempt will be made to steal the highly explosive substance "hextonite" in transit. The inventor of the substance insists on transporting the substance himself, accompanied by his secretary, Draven Nogais. During the flight, Nogais kills the inventor and parachutes the substance out of the plane. He then removes an already severed hand, places his ring on it, leaves it in the plane and parachutes out of the airplane. Drummond happens to drive by the plane crash and retrieves the case of hextonite and the severed hand before Nogais and his accomplice arrive. Drummond takes the evidence home and from the initials on the suitcase determines the owner, and also surmises that the severed hand is several days old and is probably a plant. Suddenly the lights go out and the suitcase is stolen. Drummond, his servant Tenny, his fiancèe Phyllis Clavering and his friend Algy Longworth all board a train at Victoria Station. Nogais is also on this train disguised as a woman, and has put the hextonite in a bottle of bath crystals. Drummond and Algy find the dead body of Nogais' accomplice and realize that Nogais must be on the train. They meet with Nielson on the Dover Ferry and discover Nogais' disguise. Nogais takes Tenny and Phyllis hostage in their own compartment, but Drummond comes in and takes control. An alarm clock goes off suddenly and in the confusion Nogais escapes. Nielson shoots Nogais before he can set off the explosives, and Algy catches the container of hextonite, thereby saving everyone's lives. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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