Rose of Washington Square (1939)

90 mins | Drama, Musical | 12 May 1939

Director:

Gregory Ratoff

Cinematographer:

Karl Freund

Editor:

Louis Loeffler

Production Designers:

Richard Day, Rudolph Sternad

Production Company:

Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were I Love That Man and Bowery Nightingale . It was based on the unpublished original story "I Love That Man" by Jerry Horwin and John Larkin, that was inspired by the life of the Ziegfeld Follies star Fanny Brice. According to a news item in HR , Roy Del Ruth was originally slated to direct the picture but quit over differences with studio officials. Materials contained in Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library disclose that the studio had originally intended to star Eddie Cantor in the film. Story conferences with Darryl F. Zanuck add that Sid Silvers was to have written a "stooge" routine for the script and Jule Styne was to have worked with Mack Gordon and Harry Revel on vocal arrangements. The participation of Stein and Silver in the final film has not been confirmed. According to a news item in HR , Joyce Compton replaced Marie Wilson in the role of "Peggy" when Wilson became ill after four days of shooting. Other news items in HR note that the picture was to feature twenty-two songs and that vaudeville performers The Biltmorettes, Maxwell Turk, Lurline Uller, Igor and Tanya, The Sophisticates, Marvin Jensen, and Stanley and White were signed to appear in the Greenwich Village number. A $75,000 set of Madison Square Gardens was erected at Fox's Western Ave. studios for this picture. The studio also used new, lightweight cameras in filming this picture.
       According to other news items in HR , Nicky Arnstein, who was Fanny Brice's husband, asked the Superior ... More Less

The working titles of this film were I Love That Man and Bowery Nightingale . It was based on the unpublished original story "I Love That Man" by Jerry Horwin and John Larkin, that was inspired by the life of the Ziegfeld Follies star Fanny Brice. According to a news item in HR , Roy Del Ruth was originally slated to direct the picture but quit over differences with studio officials. Materials contained in Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library disclose that the studio had originally intended to star Eddie Cantor in the film. Story conferences with Darryl F. Zanuck add that Sid Silvers was to have written a "stooge" routine for the script and Jule Styne was to have worked with Mack Gordon and Harry Revel on vocal arrangements. The participation of Stein and Silver in the final film has not been confirmed. According to a news item in HR , Joyce Compton replaced Marie Wilson in the role of "Peggy" when Wilson became ill after four days of shooting. Other news items in HR note that the picture was to feature twenty-two songs and that vaudeville performers The Biltmorettes, Maxwell Turk, Lurline Uller, Igor and Tanya, The Sophisticates, Marvin Jensen, and Stanley and White were signed to appear in the Greenwich Village number. A $75,000 set of Madison Square Gardens was erected at Fox's Western Ave. studios for this picture. The studio also used new, lightweight cameras in filming this picture.
       According to other news items in HR , Nicky Arnstein, who was Fanny Brice's husband, asked the Superior Court to prevent Fox from showing this picture because it was embarassing to him. The studio paid Arnstein $25,000 to settle the suit. Other films based on the life of Fanny Brice were the 1968 Columbia film Funny Girl , starring Barbra Streisand and Omar Shariff and directed by William Wyler; and its 1975 Columbia sequel Funny Lady , also starring Streisand and Shariff and directed by Herbert Ross. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 May 39
p. 3.
Film Daily
8 May 39
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 39
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 39
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Feb 39
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 39
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 39
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 39
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 39
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 39
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 39
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 39
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 39
p. 1.
Motion Picture Daily
8 May 39
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Mar 39
p. 56.
Motion Picture Herald
13 May 39
p. 37.
New York Times
6 May 39
p. 21.
Variety
10 May 39
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Darryl F. Zanuck in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Rose of Washington Square," music and lyrics by James F. Hanley and Ballard MacDonald
"I Never Knew Heaven Could Speak," words and music by Mack Gordon and Harry Revel.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Broadway Nightingale
I Love That Man
Release Date:
12 May 1939
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 6 May 1939
Production Date:
mid January--late March 1939
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 May 1939
Copyright Number:
LP9051
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,100
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
5093
SYNOPSIS

Vaudeville singer Ted Cotter meets Rose Sargent when he is singing at the Irving Palace burlesque house and she is performing in an amateur competition at a nearby theater. Ted falls in love with Rose, and when he ascends to stardom, he becomes her patron, helping her to rise from the music hall to the Broadway stage. Rose clicks in the Ziegfeld Follies and soon becomes a star herself, while Ted continues to worship her in silent devotion. Rose does not return Ted's feelings, however, and instead falls in love with the handsome con artist and gambler, Bart Clinton. Blinded by her love, Rose fails to see Ted's devotion and Bart's worthlessness. Rose marries Bart, whose lust for easy money drives him to break the law and leads to his arrest by the police. Ted puts up the $50,000 bail bond for Bart, but the scoundrel skips out on bail and disappears. Throughout all her trials, Rose sticks by her man, pouring her love and faith into the song "My Man," which she sobs out every night from the stage. One night, Bart is drawn to see his wife perform, and her rendition of "My Man" forces him to realize that he must give himself up to the police. This act of honesty, which has been motivated by love, redeems Bart, and Rose promises to wait for him while he serves his prison ... +


Vaudeville singer Ted Cotter meets Rose Sargent when he is singing at the Irving Palace burlesque house and she is performing in an amateur competition at a nearby theater. Ted falls in love with Rose, and when he ascends to stardom, he becomes her patron, helping her to rise from the music hall to the Broadway stage. Rose clicks in the Ziegfeld Follies and soon becomes a star herself, while Ted continues to worship her in silent devotion. Rose does not return Ted's feelings, however, and instead falls in love with the handsome con artist and gambler, Bart Clinton. Blinded by her love, Rose fails to see Ted's devotion and Bart's worthlessness. Rose marries Bart, whose lust for easy money drives him to break the law and leads to his arrest by the police. Ted puts up the $50,000 bail bond for Bart, but the scoundrel skips out on bail and disappears. Throughout all her trials, Rose sticks by her man, pouring her love and faith into the song "My Man," which she sobs out every night from the stage. One night, Bart is drawn to see his wife perform, and her rendition of "My Man" forces him to realize that he must give himself up to the police. This act of honesty, which has been motivated by love, redeems Bart, and Rose promises to wait for him while he serves his prison sentence. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.