Clive of India (1935)

90 or 92-93 mins | Drama | 25 January 1935

Cinematographer:

Peverell Marley

Editor:

Barbara McLean

Production Designer:

Richard Day

Production Company:

20th Century Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

This film took some liberties with the story of Robert Clive's life, particularly with the ending, as in reality, he committed suicide after the parliamentary inquiries. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection and their Records of the Legal Department, both of which are at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Douglas Gerrard was in the film for six days playing the role of "Lieutenant Walsh," before he was replaced by Pat Somerset, George T. Regas was to play the role of "Mir Jaffar," which Cesar Romero portrayed, and Boyd Irwin was to play "Third director," which Desmond Roberts played. MPH mistakenly lists Sir Guy Standing as a cast member; Wyndham Standing actually was in the film. According to a modern source, 20th Century head Darryl F. Zanuck saw W. P. Lipscomb and R. J. Minney's play in London, bought the screen rights and brought the two authors to Hollywood to write the ... More Less

This film took some liberties with the story of Robert Clive's life, particularly with the ending, as in reality, he committed suicide after the parliamentary inquiries. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection and their Records of the Legal Department, both of which are at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Douglas Gerrard was in the film for six days playing the role of "Lieutenant Walsh," before he was replaced by Pat Somerset, George T. Regas was to play the role of "Mir Jaffar," which Cesar Romero portrayed, and Boyd Irwin was to play "Third director," which Desmond Roberts played. MPH mistakenly lists Sir Guy Standing as a cast member; Wyndham Standing actually was in the film. According to a modern source, 20th Century head Darryl F. Zanuck saw W. P. Lipscomb and R. J. Minney's play in London, bought the screen rights and brought the two authors to Hollywood to write the screenplay. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Jan 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Jan 35
p. 4.
Harrison's Reports
26 Jan 35
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jan 35
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
18 Jan 35
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
8 Dec 34
p. 62.
Motion Picture Herald
26 Jan 35
p. 42.
New York Times
18 Jan 35
p. 29.
Variety
22 Jan 35
p. 14.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Mary McLaren
Phyllis Coghlan
Elsie Mackie
Joseph North
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Darryl F. Zanuck Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
2d cam
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Construction
COSTUMES
Cost
Ward women
Set ward
Cost supplied by
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup
Set make-up
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech dir
Scr clerk
Location
Casting
Still photog
STAND INS
Stand-in for Ronald Colman
Stand-in for Robert Greig
Stand-in for Loretta Young
Stand-in for Francis Lister
Stand-in for Lumsden Hare
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Clive of India by W. P. Lipscomb and R. J. Minney (Great Hucklow, Derbyshire, England, 27 Mar 1933) and the book of the same title by R. J. Minney (London and New York, 1931).
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 January 1935
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 January 1935
Production Date:
1 November--4 December 1934
Copyright Claimant:
20th Century Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 January 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5274
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 92-93
Length(in feet):
8,434
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
PCA No:
501
SYNOPSIS

In 1748, at Fort St. David, India, the French, Dutch, Portuguese and British are competing to establish trading posts. Robert Clive, a frustrated clerk for the East India Company, which enjoys the protection of the British government, proposes marriage in a letter to Margaret Maskelyne after seeing her picture in a locket worn by a fellow clerk, her brother Edmund. After word arrives that the French have attacked, Clive, a malcontent who believes in destiny, joins the British Army. When the entire British forces face almost certain annihilation at Trichinopoly, Clive escapes and convinces Governor Pigot to let him lead the remaining men to attack Arcot, the capital of Southern India, to divide the enemy forces. Clive succeeds and in less than a year becomes the conqueror of Southern India. Before a reception in his honor, Clive meets Margaret, but now that Clive is a hero, she does not want him to feel obligated to marry her. Clive, however, proposes and they return to England. Later, after Clive loses his seat in Parliament and all his money in the election campaign, and the doctor tells Margaret that their baby son will die within months, they return to India where madman King Suraj Ud Dowlah of Northern India has killed one hundred and forty-six English subjects by suffocation in the Black Hole of Calcutta. Clive forges the name of Admiral Charles Watson to a treaty with Suraj Ud Dowlah's uncle, Mir Jaffar, because the timid admiral hasn't the courage to sign, and after receiving encouragement from Margaret, he launches a surprise counterattack with far inferior forces against Suraj Ud Dowlah. The enemy counters ... +


In 1748, at Fort St. David, India, the French, Dutch, Portuguese and British are competing to establish trading posts. Robert Clive, a frustrated clerk for the East India Company, which enjoys the protection of the British government, proposes marriage in a letter to Margaret Maskelyne after seeing her picture in a locket worn by a fellow clerk, her brother Edmund. After word arrives that the French have attacked, Clive, a malcontent who believes in destiny, joins the British Army. When the entire British forces face almost certain annihilation at Trichinopoly, Clive escapes and convinces Governor Pigot to let him lead the remaining men to attack Arcot, the capital of Southern India, to divide the enemy forces. Clive succeeds and in less than a year becomes the conqueror of Southern India. Before a reception in his honor, Clive meets Margaret, but now that Clive is a hero, she does not want him to feel obligated to marry her. Clive, however, proposes and they return to England. Later, after Clive loses his seat in Parliament and all his money in the election campaign, and the doctor tells Margaret that their baby son will die within months, they return to India where madman King Suraj Ud Dowlah of Northern India has killed one hundred and forty-six English subjects by suffocation in the Black Hole of Calcutta. Clive forges the name of Admiral Charles Watson to a treaty with Suraj Ud Dowlah's uncle, Mir Jaffar, because the timid admiral hasn't the courage to sign, and after receiving encouragement from Margaret, he launches a surprise counterattack with far inferior forces against Suraj Ud Dowlah. The enemy counters using battle elephants, but Mir Jaffar's forces arrive and destroy Suraj Ud Dowlah's. Mir Jaffar, now king, presents Clive with a gift that allows him to retire to England. Years later, Governor Pigot calls on Clive to return to India where chaos now reigns due in large part to the flagrant abuses of the East India Company directors. Although Margaret strongly objects and predicts that her husband's success will end in disaster, Clive goes there and quells the situation, but the dismissed officers of the trading company launch a smear campaign against Clive charging that Mir Jaffar's gift was a bribe. Clive returns to face trial at the House of Commons and waits for the verdict at Queen's Square, his and Margaret's modest first home, where, despite their falling out, she visits and comforts him. The prime minister arrives and says that although the House condemned him, his fortune is safe and his honor intact, and conveys a message of gratitude from King George for adding great new dominions to the British Empire. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.