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HISTORY

Although a copyright statement for Associated Producers, Inc. appears on the film, there is no listing in the Copyright Catalog for the film or for Associated Producers, Inc. Some modern sources state that Virginia Mayo was an extra in the film. ...

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Although a copyright statement for Associated Producers, Inc. appears on the film, there is no listing in the Copyright Catalog for the film or for Associated Producers, Inc. Some modern sources state that Virginia Mayo was an extra in the film.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture Herald
18 Sep 1943
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Jan 1943
p. 1104
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Sep 1943
p. 1542
Variety
25 Aug 1943
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A William Rowland Productions
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Prod exec
WRITERS
Addl dial
Addl dial
Orig story
Orig story
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
SET DECORATOR
Settings
COSTUMES
Cost
Gowns and furs
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus supv
Orch arr
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
John T. Doran
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"No Man in the House," music and lyrics by Nick and Charles Kenny; "Shall We Gather at the Rhythm," music and lyrics by Sonny Burke and Johnny Murphy; "I Told a Lie," music and lyrics by Nick Kenny, Kim Gannon and Ken Lane; "Someone to Love," music and lyrics by Robert Warren; "Keep the Flag Aflying America," music and lyrics by Mary Schaeffer; "I Knew Your Father, Son," "Thoity Poiple Boids" and "Fascination," music and lyrics by Fred Wise, Buddy Kaye and Sidney Lippman.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 June 1943
Production Date:

Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
74
Length(in feet):
6,240
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9138
SYNOPSIS

Sergeant Bill Perkins is the emcee at Broadway's Swing Canteen and especially admires Francine La Rue, a singer who regularly performs at the Bijou Burlesque. When Andre Duval, the snobbish head designer at White Way Costume Co., fires designer Anne Merriday for developing her own designs, she seeks advice from her friend Francine, who suggests she style costumes for the burlesque dancers. Francine and Anne convince the manager, Jimmy Dobson, to revamp the show using Anne's extravagant costume designs. Dobson upgrades the quality of the show and calls it "Follies Girl." The new show is a success, and J. B. Hamlin, the owner of White Way, takes an interest in Anne's designs after he fires Duval. Anne goes out with Hamlin to discuss the arrangements and Hamlin's son Jerry, a serviceman who has admired her from afar, is shocked to see her on an apparent date with his father. Bill and Francine arrange for Jerry and Anne to meet, and Jerry pretends to be a Nebraskan farmboy so that she will not know he is Hamlin's son. Anne and Jerry fall in love, but their idyll is ruined when Anne learns that Jerry has lied after seeing his photo on Hamlin's desk. As a result, she refuses to see him. When Mrs. Hamlin plans for an opera troupe to perform at her house for the servicemen, Bill knows the opera music will bore the men. He mischieviously sends the opera troupe elsewhere and arranges for the burlesque show to perform instead. Jerry catches up with Anne there and explains that he initially misunderstood her relationship with his father. The ...

More Less

Sergeant Bill Perkins is the emcee at Broadway's Swing Canteen and especially admires Francine La Rue, a singer who regularly performs at the Bijou Burlesque. When Andre Duval, the snobbish head designer at White Way Costume Co., fires designer Anne Merriday for developing her own designs, she seeks advice from her friend Francine, who suggests she style costumes for the burlesque dancers. Francine and Anne convince the manager, Jimmy Dobson, to revamp the show using Anne's extravagant costume designs. Dobson upgrades the quality of the show and calls it "Follies Girl." The new show is a success, and J. B. Hamlin, the owner of White Way, takes an interest in Anne's designs after he fires Duval. Anne goes out with Hamlin to discuss the arrangements and Hamlin's son Jerry, a serviceman who has admired her from afar, is shocked to see her on an apparent date with his father. Bill and Francine arrange for Jerry and Anne to meet, and Jerry pretends to be a Nebraskan farmboy so that she will not know he is Hamlin's son. Anne and Jerry fall in love, but their idyll is ruined when Anne learns that Jerry has lied after seeing his photo on Hamlin's desk. As a result, she refuses to see him. When Mrs. Hamlin plans for an opera troupe to perform at her house for the servicemen, Bill knows the opera music will bore the men. He mischieviously sends the opera troupe elsewhere and arranges for the burlesque show to perform instead. Jerry catches up with Anne there and explains that he initially misunderstood her relationship with his father. The situation is happily resolved, and Anne accepts Jerry's marriage proposal.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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