Typhoon (1940)

70 mins | Adventure | 17 May 1940

Director:

Louis King

Writer:

Allen Rivkin

Producer:

Anthony Veiller

Cinematographer:

William C. Mellor

Editor:

Alma Macrorie

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, John Goodman

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to Paramount publicity contained in the production files on the film at the AMPAS Library, more than half of this picture was filmed on Santa Catalina Island, CA. Publicity materials also note that during production, Koko, the chimpanzee, slapped Dorothy Lamour on the shoulder, causing her to lose her balance and fall against a rock, thus injuring her back. The accident resulted in her being hospitalized for two days. Studio publicity also credits Farciot Edouart, not Gordon Jennings with special effects. Although Angelo Cruz is credited with the role of Kehi's bodyguard on screen, the Var review credits Paul Singh with the role. A news item in HR notes that technical advisor Dr. E. F. Winckler was a plantation owner from Sumatra. The film received an Academy Award nomination in the Special Effects (Photographic Effects, Farciout Edouart, Gordon Jennings; Sound Effects, Loren L. Ryder) ... More Less

According to Paramount publicity contained in the production files on the film at the AMPAS Library, more than half of this picture was filmed on Santa Catalina Island, CA. Publicity materials also note that during production, Koko, the chimpanzee, slapped Dorothy Lamour on the shoulder, causing her to lose her balance and fall against a rock, thus injuring her back. The accident resulted in her being hospitalized for two days. Studio publicity also credits Farciot Edouart, not Gordon Jennings with special effects. Although Angelo Cruz is credited with the role of Kehi's bodyguard on screen, the Var review credits Paul Singh with the role. A news item in HR notes that technical advisor Dr. E. F. Winckler was a plantation owner from Sumatra. The film received an Academy Award nomination in the Special Effects (Photographic Effects, Farciout Edouart, Gordon Jennings; Sound Effects, Loren L. Ryder) category. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Apr 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
30 Apr 40
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 39
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 39
pp. 4-5.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 39
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 40
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Apr 40
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
23 May 40
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
28 Oct 39
p. 60, 62
Motion Picture Herald
4 May 40
p. 41.
New York Times
23 May 40
p. 28.
Variety
1 May 40
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Contr to special sequences
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Assoc cam
Spec photog eff
Spec eff
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
PRODUCTION MISC
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor dir
Assoc
SOURCES
SONGS
"Palms of Paradise," words and music by Frederick Hollander and Frank Loesser.
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 May 1940
Premiere Information:
Honolulu opening: 25 April 1940
Production Date:
began 31 July 1939
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 May 1940
Copyright Number:
LP9644
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
5687
SYNOPSIS

Having been marooned on an isolated island as a child, Dea grows to adulthood without human contact, her only companion being the chimp "Koko." Years later, on a South Sea island, Skipper Joe, a former bookie who has traded chasing dark horses for the pursuit of black pearls, meets Johnny Potter, a former Navy man who has lived in a drunken stupor since being kicked out of the service. The skipper tries to convince Johnny to sign on as his navigator, but Johnny refuses to return to the sea. However, after a bar room brawl with the savage Kehi, Johnny is knocked unconscious and is shanghaied by Skipper aboard his rusty old submarine. The men are chased from the harbor by Kehi, who is furious because Mekaike, one of the skipper's men, has stolen his black pearl earrings. After running out of oil because Mekaike has forgotten to refuel the tank, they reach the island inhabited by Dea, where Johnny collapses on the beach in a drunken stupor. The skipper leaves his friend on the beach, where Dea and Koko find him and take him to their treehouse to recover. When the skipper returns to the beach, he thinks that Johnny has been washed out to sea. As the skipper and his men build a boat to leave the island, Dea begs Johnny to stay, but fearing that he is doomed to die an early death from alcohol, he refuses. Finding his way back to the beach, Johnny arrives just as Mekaike leads a mutiny against the skipper. After tying Johnny and the skipper to a tree, the men steal the ... +


Having been marooned on an isolated island as a child, Dea grows to adulthood without human contact, her only companion being the chimp "Koko." Years later, on a South Sea island, Skipper Joe, a former bookie who has traded chasing dark horses for the pursuit of black pearls, meets Johnny Potter, a former Navy man who has lived in a drunken stupor since being kicked out of the service. The skipper tries to convince Johnny to sign on as his navigator, but Johnny refuses to return to the sea. However, after a bar room brawl with the savage Kehi, Johnny is knocked unconscious and is shanghaied by Skipper aboard his rusty old submarine. The men are chased from the harbor by Kehi, who is furious because Mekaike, one of the skipper's men, has stolen his black pearl earrings. After running out of oil because Mekaike has forgotten to refuel the tank, they reach the island inhabited by Dea, where Johnny collapses on the beach in a drunken stupor. The skipper leaves his friend on the beach, where Dea and Koko find him and take him to their treehouse to recover. When the skipper returns to the beach, he thinks that Johnny has been washed out to sea. As the skipper and his men build a boat to leave the island, Dea begs Johnny to stay, but fearing that he is doomed to die an early death from alcohol, he refuses. Finding his way back to the beach, Johnny arrives just as Mekaike leads a mutiny against the skipper. After tying Johnny and the skipper to a tree, the men steal the submarine, only to drown when they dive with the hatch open. Stranded, Johnny and the skipper continue building their boat until Kehi tracks them down and sets fire to the island. As the flames consume the foliage, a typhoon roars in from the sea and floods the island, leaving a lifeboat behind in its wake. Dea, Johnny, the skipper and Koko then board the little craft and sail off to civilization. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Island


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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