Almost Married (1932)

50-51 mins | Horror | 17 July 1932

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HISTORY

As the opening credits were missing from the print viewed, the onscreen credits listed above were taken from a screen billing sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. The working titles of this film were Circumstance and Circumstances . It appears that portions of the film were remade after the initial shooting period of 26 Oct--18 Nov 1931. Information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, also at UCLA, and in their legal records credit only Wallace Smith with the adaptation and dialogue, William Cameron Menzies with the direction and John Mescall with photography in documents dated in Oct and Nov 1931. Production charts during the initial shooting period also credit only Menzies as the director. The film was previewed in Hollywood in mid-Dec and reviewed at that time by MPH , which listed its release date as 17 Jan 1932. An outline of a proposed first sequence, dated 16 Dec 1931, in the Produced Scripts Collection, is by Guy Bolton, as is a treatment dated 18 Dec 1931. The credits on a "Final Script" with revisions, dated 3 Mar 1932, list Smith with adaptation and dialogue and Bolton with revisions; a "Second Run" dated 17 Mar 1932, contains the same credits. The screen credits give Smith and Bolton co-credit for the screenplay, Menzies and Marcel Varnel co-credit for the direction, George Schneiderman and Mescall co-credit for the photography, and W. W. Lindsay, Jr. and Eugene Grossman co-credit for the sound recording. It thus seems likely that some scenes were reshot or added in Mar 1932, which were written by Bolton, directed by ... More Less

As the opening credits were missing from the print viewed, the onscreen credits listed above were taken from a screen billing sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. The working titles of this film were Circumstance and Circumstances . It appears that portions of the film were remade after the initial shooting period of 26 Oct--18 Nov 1931. Information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, also at UCLA, and in their legal records credit only Wallace Smith with the adaptation and dialogue, William Cameron Menzies with the direction and John Mescall with photography in documents dated in Oct and Nov 1931. Production charts during the initial shooting period also credit only Menzies as the director. The film was previewed in Hollywood in mid-Dec and reviewed at that time by MPH , which listed its release date as 17 Jan 1932. An outline of a proposed first sequence, dated 16 Dec 1931, in the Produced Scripts Collection, is by Guy Bolton, as is a treatment dated 18 Dec 1931. The credits on a "Final Script" with revisions, dated 3 Mar 1932, list Smith with adaptation and dialogue and Bolton with revisions; a "Second Run" dated 17 Mar 1932, contains the same credits. The screen credits give Smith and Bolton co-credit for the screenplay, Menzies and Marcel Varnel co-credit for the direction, George Schneiderman and Mescall co-credit for the photography, and W. W. Lindsay, Jr. and Eugene Grossman co-credit for the sound recording. It thus seems likely that some scenes were reshot or added in Mar 1932, which were written by Bolton, directed by Varnel (or perhaps Menzies and Varnel), photographed by Schneiderman and recorded by Grossman. Reviews and the Fox trade paper advertising billing sheets only credit William Cameron Menzies as director, Wallace Smith for screenplay, John Mescall for photography and W. W. Lindsay, Jr. for sound recording. Var notes that this was Menzies' debut as a director; however, he was co-director on two films made in 1931, Always Goodbye and The Spider (see below). In the Final Shooting Script, dated 23 Oct 1931, Ralph Dietrich is credited as film editor, and Paul Cavanagh with the role of Deene Maxwell. While Cavanagh was not in the film, it is not known whether Dietrich actually worked on the production. Gustav von Seyffertitz is not listed in any reviews or in the Final Shooting Script of 23 Oct 1931, so it is likely that his role was added for the new material. FD lists the running time as 67 minutes while Var and MPH list it as 50 and 51 minutes, respectively. Var erroneously states that the film is a remake of a 1919 Metro film; there was a 1919 film made by Metro with the same title, but it was a comedy and its plot bears no resemblance to that of this film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
29 Jul 32
p. 4.
HF
28 Nov 31
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 31
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
5 Dec 31
p. 62.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Dec 31
pp. 49-50.
Variety
26 Jul 32
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Addl orig dial
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Casting dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Devil's Triangle by Andrew Soutar (London, 1931).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Circumstances
Circumstance
Release Date:
17 July 1932
Production Date:
26 October--18 November 1931
March 1932
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
22 April 1932
Copyright Number:
LP3119
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
50-51
Length(in feet):
4,700
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

An officer with orders from Tcheka, the Russian secret police, stops a train in search of Anita Mellikovna. Anita is traveling with a forged passport and has obtained jewels which her father, who escaped from Russia in 1922, hid. Seeing Deene Maxwell, whom she met one summer in Scotland, on a train across the tracks, Anita climbs out of her train and enters his compartment. Deene, a British official enroute to Moscow on a trade mission, suggests they pose as husband and wife as he has diplomatic immunity. In Moscow, after they are threateningly followed, Deene, who fell in love with Anita in Scotland, offers to marry her at the British Embassy with the understanding that they will get an annulment after they leave Russia. After the wedding, Anita reveals that she is already married; when she studied music in Paris five years earlier, she married an eccentric, violent composer, Louis Capristi, whom she left on their wedding night after he threatened her. Unknown to Anita, Capristi, under the name Charles Pringle, has been locked up in an English asylum for the criminally insane since he strangled a woman to death. In England, Deene and Anita, having fallen in love, are confronted by Capristi, who escaped after he read in the news about their marriage. Capristi threatens to have them arrested for bigamy unless he is allowed to stay a few days until his boat for South America sails. Deene's friend, Scotland Yard Inspector Slante, becomes suspicious of Capristi's odd mannerisms and posts guards to watch him. When Capristi ditches the watchmen, Slante becomes convinced he is a crook. One rainy evening, ... +


An officer with orders from Tcheka, the Russian secret police, stops a train in search of Anita Mellikovna. Anita is traveling with a forged passport and has obtained jewels which her father, who escaped from Russia in 1922, hid. Seeing Deene Maxwell, whom she met one summer in Scotland, on a train across the tracks, Anita climbs out of her train and enters his compartment. Deene, a British official enroute to Moscow on a trade mission, suggests they pose as husband and wife as he has diplomatic immunity. In Moscow, after they are threateningly followed, Deene, who fell in love with Anita in Scotland, offers to marry her at the British Embassy with the understanding that they will get an annulment after they leave Russia. After the wedding, Anita reveals that she is already married; when she studied music in Paris five years earlier, she married an eccentric, violent composer, Louis Capristi, whom she left on their wedding night after he threatened her. Unknown to Anita, Capristi, under the name Charles Pringle, has been locked up in an English asylum for the criminally insane since he strangled a woman to death. In England, Deene and Anita, having fallen in love, are confronted by Capristi, who escaped after he read in the news about their marriage. Capristi threatens to have them arrested for bigamy unless he is allowed to stay a few days until his boat for South America sails. Deene's friend, Scotland Yard Inspector Slante, becomes suspicious of Capristi's odd mannerisms and posts guards to watch him. When Capristi ditches the watchmen, Slante becomes convinced he is a crook. One rainy evening, a detective looking for Pringle follows Capristi to a French restaurant in Soho. After a French girl, Mariette, recognizes Capristi as Pringle, he escorts her to her nearby room where he confesses his identity and strangles her. Disguising his voice, Capristi calls Deene and convinces him to meet Slante at Mariette's apartment. Capristi then goes to Deene and Anita's home and, after killing their butler Jenkins, tries to strangle Anita, but she eludes his grasp. Deene returns just as Capristi has cornered Anita on a ledge. After he shoots Capristi, Anita worries about a scandal, but Slante keeps Capristi's identity hidden and identifies the body as Pringle's, and thus the bigamy charge remains undisclosed. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.