Come On Marines! (1934)

64 or 68 mins | Comedy-drama | 23 March 1934

Director:

Henry Hathaway

Cinematographer:

Ben Reynolds

Editor:

James Smith

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Earl Hedrick

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to news items in DV , production on this film began on 15 Jan 1934 without a male lead. Paramount was considering both Richard Arlen and Buster Crabbe in the lead and hoped to give Crabbe "build up," but ended up casting Arlen. The script had been "floating around" Paramount for three years and had been in and out of several writers' hands before it was finally made. Writers Byron Morgan and Joel Sayre completed a new version in less than five weeks in order to meet the start of production. According to HR , in early Aug 1931, the film had been scheduled to start production with "Skeets" Gallagher as the lead, but by 12 Aug, production had ceased. According to a news item in DV , this was the first film Henry Hathaway directed that was not a Western. Scripts in the Paramount story files at the AMPAS Library list Albert Lewis as associate producer. Both the NYT and the Var reviews call Lona Andre's character "Loretta" and Clara Lou Sheridan's character "Shirley." Var calls Gwenllian Gill's character Katherine. The opening credits are superimposed over poster ads for the Marines, which promise "adventures over the ... More Less

According to news items in DV , production on this film began on 15 Jan 1934 without a male lead. Paramount was considering both Richard Arlen and Buster Crabbe in the lead and hoped to give Crabbe "build up," but ended up casting Arlen. The script had been "floating around" Paramount for three years and had been in and out of several writers' hands before it was finally made. Writers Byron Morgan and Joel Sayre completed a new version in less than five weeks in order to meet the start of production. According to HR , in early Aug 1931, the film had been scheduled to start production with "Skeets" Gallagher as the lead, but by 12 Aug, production had ceased. According to a news item in DV , this was the first film Henry Hathaway directed that was not a Western. Scripts in the Paramount story files at the AMPAS Library list Albert Lewis as associate producer. Both the NYT and the Var reviews call Lona Andre's character "Loretta" and Clara Lou Sheridan's character "Shirley." Var calls Gwenllian Gill's character Katherine. The opening credits are superimposed over poster ads for the Marines, which promise "adventures over the world." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Jan 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
24 Jan 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
9 Feb 34
p. 3.
Daily Variety
1 Mar 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
24 Mar 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 31
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 31
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
2 Mar 34
p. 11.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Mar 34
p. 52.
New York Times
24 Mar 34
p. 20.
Variety
27 Mar 34
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Adpt and scr
Adpt and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Oh Baby, Obey," music by Ralph Rainger, lyrics by Leo Robin
"Hula Holiday," music and lyrics by Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin
"Tequila," music and lyrics by Ralph Rainger.
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 March 1934
Production Date:
began 15 January 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
21 March 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4574
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64 or 68
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

When Sergeant Lucky Davis meets Jo-Jo LaVerne while on liberty, he becomes part of a scandal that leaves him demoted to private and consigned to the jungles of the Philippines. Lucky forces Terence V. Spud McGurke, a taxi driver and ex-marine who deserted, to go with him because of his part in the scandal. When the Seventh Squad, U.S. Marine Corps, is sent to rescue a group of shipwrecked children, they discover the "children" are really young debutantes on leave from a Parisian finishing school. Later, bandit Celano shoots at the mission where the women are staying, and it is feared he will try to use them as ransom. Lucky then receives orders to arrest Spud for deserting, but tears up the note. The marines and the women exchange clothes to trick Celano as they leave the mission in two wagons. When the bandits shoot at a wagon full of dresses, the marines return fire and beat back the mob, then return to the mission. As the men and women settle down for the night, they can't keep away from each other, and even Lucky, who had called the girls "spoiled brats," wins a kiss from Esther Cabot. Spud, however, tries to escape in the night, but Lucky finds him, and together they fight a group of guerilla natives. One of the men, "Brooklyn," speaks English and agrees to lead them through the jungle, assuring them that Celano is dead. En route to camp, Brooklyn, who is really Celano, tries to escape and knifes Lucky and Spud, but they knock him out with the butt end of a revolver. When they arrive ... +


When Sergeant Lucky Davis meets Jo-Jo LaVerne while on liberty, he becomes part of a scandal that leaves him demoted to private and consigned to the jungles of the Philippines. Lucky forces Terence V. Spud McGurke, a taxi driver and ex-marine who deserted, to go with him because of his part in the scandal. When the Seventh Squad, U.S. Marine Corps, is sent to rescue a group of shipwrecked children, they discover the "children" are really young debutantes on leave from a Parisian finishing school. Later, bandit Celano shoots at the mission where the women are staying, and it is feared he will try to use them as ransom. Lucky then receives orders to arrest Spud for deserting, but tears up the note. The marines and the women exchange clothes to trick Celano as they leave the mission in two wagons. When the bandits shoot at a wagon full of dresses, the marines return fire and beat back the mob, then return to the mission. As the men and women settle down for the night, they can't keep away from each other, and even Lucky, who had called the girls "spoiled brats," wins a kiss from Esther Cabot. Spud, however, tries to escape in the night, but Lucky finds him, and together they fight a group of guerilla natives. One of the men, "Brooklyn," speaks English and agrees to lead them through the jungle, assuring them that Celano is dead. En route to camp, Brooklyn, who is really Celano, tries to escape and knifes Lucky and Spud, but they knock him out with the butt end of a revolver. When they arrive at camp the next morning with Celano as their prisoner, they are surprised to learn his identity. Lieutenant Allen has also arrived, and Lucky and Spud are exonerated. Back in America, taxi driver Spud drives Esther and Lucky up the stairs of St. James Church for their wedding. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.