Arizona to Broadway (1933)

66-67 mins | Comedy-drama | 30 June 1933

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HISTORY

According to HR , the title of this film, Arizona to Broadway , was originally scheduled to be used by Fox as the title of a film starring Will Rogers, Sally Eilers and James Dunn, which was to be the story of Rogers' life. That project was shelved, and the story for this film was written with the title in mind. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Dudley Nichols worked on a continuity for the film when it was to star Rogers; it is not known if any of his contributions were included in the final film. According to FD , James Tinling was selected to direct this film as a reward for his work for Fox directing Spanish-language films. In the film, the character played by Walter Catlett, "Ned Flynn," has the look and mannerisms of Ed Wynn; the character played by Jerry Lester, "Jimmy Dante," looks, speaks and acts like Jimmy Durante; and Jean Malin, a female impersonator called "Ray Best," performs a Mae West imitation. According to Malin's contract in the legal records, he agreed not to use the character he portrayed in this film in any other motion picture for six months. While the screen credits list the character played by Earle Foxe as "Sandburg," a newspaper photograph in the film and the dialogue continuity in the copyright descriptions call him "Sandberg." According to a HR news item, Greta Nissen was to have a top role, but she was not in the final ... More Less

According to HR , the title of this film, Arizona to Broadway , was originally scheduled to be used by Fox as the title of a film starring Will Rogers, Sally Eilers and James Dunn, which was to be the story of Rogers' life. That project was shelved, and the story for this film was written with the title in mind. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Dudley Nichols worked on a continuity for the film when it was to star Rogers; it is not known if any of his contributions were included in the final film. According to FD , James Tinling was selected to direct this film as a reward for his work for Fox directing Spanish-language films. In the film, the character played by Walter Catlett, "Ned Flynn," has the look and mannerisms of Ed Wynn; the character played by Jerry Lester, "Jimmy Dante," looks, speaks and acts like Jimmy Durante; and Jean Malin, a female impersonator called "Ray Best," performs a Mae West imitation. According to Malin's contract in the legal records, he agreed not to use the character he portrayed in this film in any other motion picture for six months. While the screen credits list the character played by Earle Foxe as "Sandburg," a newspaper photograph in the film and the dialogue continuity in the copyright descriptions call him "Sandberg." According to a HR news item, Greta Nissen was to have a top role, but she was not in the final film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Apr 33
p. 9.
Film Daily
22 Jul 33
p. 3.
HF
13 May 33
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 33
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 33
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 33
p. 4.
International Photographer
1 Jun 33
p. 25.
Motion Picture Daily
22 Jul 33
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Jun 33
p. 59.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Jul 33
p. 32.
New York Times
22 Jul 33
p. 14.
Variety
25 Jul 33
p. 35.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam crew
Cam crew
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Frocks
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Ain't It Gonna Ring No More," music and lyrics by Val Burton and Will Jason
"Frankie and Johnnie," anonymous.
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 June 1933
Production Date:
began mid May 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 June 1933
Copyright Number:
LP3961
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
66-67
Length(in feet):
6,033
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In the small town of Larrup, Arizona, Smiley, a con-artist traveling with cohorts Kingfish, Morris and Ambrose, persuades Lynn Martin, a traveling demonstrator of pancake making, to accompany him to a carnival, where Kingfish sells a large number of bottles of Bambo, an elixir. When a woman denounces Kingfish as a faker, Smiley, identifying himself as a medical inspector, conducts Kingfish safely through the angry crowd and grabs Lynn's purse on the way out. Later, on a train, Smiley meets Lynn again, and after he returns the purse, she explains that she is traveling to find the trail of three swindlers who talked her brother, a bank officer, into investing $20,000 belonging to an estate he was handling, and then left with the money. Two of the crooks, a couple named Sandburg, are in New Orleans, while the other, Hubert Wayne, is promoting a new show in New York. Smiley offers to help after privately convincing his cohorts that once they "cheat the cheaters," they will keep the money themselves. In a New Orleans hotel, Kingfish, masquerading as a philandering Texas oilman, attracts the interest of the Sandburgs, who plan to trap him in a compromising position and then blackmail him. After a fight, however, Kingfish, Smiley and the others get away with the Sandburgs' half of the swindle, $10,000, and proceed to New York where Lynn, posing as a chorus girl, has provoked Wayne's advances. When she introduces Wayne to Kingfish, who this time masquerades as a British jam manufacturer, Wayne, planning to swindle Kingfish, persuades him to invest $10,000 in the show to match his own $10,000, which gangster Tommy ... +


In the small town of Larrup, Arizona, Smiley, a con-artist traveling with cohorts Kingfish, Morris and Ambrose, persuades Lynn Martin, a traveling demonstrator of pancake making, to accompany him to a carnival, where Kingfish sells a large number of bottles of Bambo, an elixir. When a woman denounces Kingfish as a faker, Smiley, identifying himself as a medical inspector, conducts Kingfish safely through the angry crowd and grabs Lynn's purse on the way out. Later, on a train, Smiley meets Lynn again, and after he returns the purse, she explains that she is traveling to find the trail of three swindlers who talked her brother, a bank officer, into investing $20,000 belonging to an estate he was handling, and then left with the money. Two of the crooks, a couple named Sandburg, are in New Orleans, while the other, Hubert Wayne, is promoting a new show in New York. Smiley offers to help after privately convincing his cohorts that once they "cheat the cheaters," they will keep the money themselves. In a New Orleans hotel, Kingfish, masquerading as a philandering Texas oilman, attracts the interest of the Sandburgs, who plan to trap him in a compromising position and then blackmail him. After a fight, however, Kingfish, Smiley and the others get away with the Sandburgs' half of the swindle, $10,000, and proceed to New York where Lynn, posing as a chorus girl, has provoked Wayne's advances. When she introduces Wayne to Kingfish, who this time masquerades as a British jam manufacturer, Wayne, planning to swindle Kingfish, persuades him to invest $10,000 in the show to match his own $10,000, which gangster Tommy Monk fronts for the swindle. Wayne then plans to appropriate Kingfish's money through a switch of envelopes. Suspecting the ruse, Smiley trains Kingfish to do his own envelope switch. Kingfish's switch works, but after Smiley leaves with the $20,000, Wayne and Tommy discover the trick and capture Lynn and Kingfish, who reveals, to Lynn's dismay, Smiley's plan to keep the money. Tommy takes over the show to make back his money and coerces stage stars Ned Flynn, Jimmy Dante and female impersonator Ray Best to perform. On opening night, Smiley is captured at the theater, but he is able to call Tommy's rival, Rags Rigby. By imitating Tommy's voice, Smiley dares Rigby to come to the show. Rigby and his men respond to the challenge and start a massive fight in the theater. Smiley rescues Lynn and later, on another train, after he learns that Lynn did not trust him, upbraids her and reveals that he sent the money to her brother. The other three cohorts then decide to go straight. Lynn, after planting her purse in Smiley's pocket, playfully accuses him of robbing her, and they embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.