Parole Fixer (1940)

57 mins | Drama | 2 February 1940

Director:

Robert Florey

Cinematographer:

George Barnes

Editor:

Harvey Johnston

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, John Goodman

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Exploitation press material found in copyright records credits Harry Fischbeck as photographer and Harold Lewis as sound editor. The character of crooked lawyer "Tyler Craden" also appears in the 1939 Paramount picture Disbarred , played by Otto Kruger (see above). J. Edgar Hoover's book also served as the source for the Paramount films Undercover Doctor and Queen of the Mob (see ... More Less

Exploitation press material found in copyright records credits Harry Fischbeck as photographer and Harold Lewis as sound editor. The character of crooked lawyer "Tyler Craden" also appears in the 1939 Paramount picture Disbarred , played by Otto Kruger (see above). J. Edgar Hoover's book also served as the source for the Paramount films Undercover Doctor and Queen of the Mob (see below). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
26 Apr 40
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 40
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
7 Feb 40
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Feb 40
p. .
New York Times
18 Apr 40
p. 28.
Variety
7 Feb 40
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book Persons in Hiding by J. Edgar Hoover (Boston, 1938).
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 February 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
2 February 1940
Copyright Number:
LP9401
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
57
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
5591
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Attorney Tyler Craden dictates to his secretary, Colette Menthe, a letter supposedly from the mother of convicted murderer Frances "Big Boy" Bradmore and encloses a phony lock of her hair. The warden, believing the letter sincere, releases Bradmore, who immediately begins to murder again. At the Federal Bureau of Investigation's training school, agents return every eighteen months, including Scott Britton, Ross Waring and George Mattison. George's family includes his wife Rita, his two sons Bob and Jim, and Aunt Lindy, his black cook. The F.B.I. is called into the Bradmore case after he steals of batch of furs. Aware that parole board member Gustav Kalkus is badly in need of money, Craden blackmails him into supporting the parole of criminal Steve Eddson. Simultaneously, Craden begins a petition drive for Eddson, "a boy who never had a chance," capitalizing on the idle time of wealthy, philanthropic ladies, especially Mrs. Thornton Casserly. Enid Casserly, who attends business school, disagrees with her mother's activity. Despite their class differences, Enid is engaged to Bruce Eaton. While George is driving with his family, he spots Bradmore, and is shot in the back as he trails the criminal. F.B.I. agent Hoover telephones Rita to console her grief, while other agents take care of her children. Eddson's parole hearing becomes a debate on the benefits and drawbacks of parole: a member named Ben posits whether the state saving $400 a year in prisoner costs is worth the life of a George Mattison, while another member claims that Eddson's handwriting proves his character has possibilities. With the help of Mrs. Casserly's lawyer, Porter Randall, and Kalkus' manipulation of the parole board, ... +


Attorney Tyler Craden dictates to his secretary, Colette Menthe, a letter supposedly from the mother of convicted murderer Frances "Big Boy" Bradmore and encloses a phony lock of her hair. The warden, believing the letter sincere, releases Bradmore, who immediately begins to murder again. At the Federal Bureau of Investigation's training school, agents return every eighteen months, including Scott Britton, Ross Waring and George Mattison. George's family includes his wife Rita, his two sons Bob and Jim, and Aunt Lindy, his black cook. The F.B.I. is called into the Bradmore case after he steals of batch of furs. Aware that parole board member Gustav Kalkus is badly in need of money, Craden blackmails him into supporting the parole of criminal Steve Eddson. Simultaneously, Craden begins a petition drive for Eddson, "a boy who never had a chance," capitalizing on the idle time of wealthy, philanthropic ladies, especially Mrs. Thornton Casserly. Enid Casserly, who attends business school, disagrees with her mother's activity. Despite their class differences, Enid is engaged to Bruce Eaton. While George is driving with his family, he spots Bradmore, and is shot in the back as he trails the criminal. F.B.I. agent Hoover telephones Rita to console her grief, while other agents take care of her children. Eddson's parole hearing becomes a debate on the benefits and drawbacks of parole: a member named Ben posits whether the state saving $400 a year in prisoner costs is worth the life of a George Mattison, while another member claims that Eddson's handwriting proves his character has possibilities. With the help of Mrs. Casserly's lawyer, Porter Randall, and Kalkus' manipulation of the parole board, Eddson is released. Mrs. Casserly hires him as her chauffeur, and soon Porter is defending Eddson against a traffic ticket. Aunt Lindy's new restaurant, which now supports the Mattison family, is patronized by F.B.I. men, who discuss the abuses of the parole system. When Porter demands $75,000 as payment for fixing Eddson's parole, Craden and Eddson meet with him at a cabin hideaway to discuss the matter, and Craden suggests Eddson engineer the abduction of Enid to secure the money. Eddson hires Bradmore and Edward "Slim" Racky to handle the kidnapping, and Enid is abducted with Bruce to make it look as if they have eloped. Eddson leaves a ransom note for Porter, in order to avoid being suspected. Agent Bartley Hanford takes charge of the case, and a scientific search is made of Enid's car and Eddson's room. Aunt Lindy cleverly tricks Craden into allowing her to take evidence from his shoe. To make Eddson suspect Bradmore of a double-cross, the F.B.I. men send a second ransom note. When Craden and Eddson go to the cabin, they are caught, along with their accomplices. A plan to reform the state's parole system along the federal model is enforced, and a plaque is raised to honor slain F.B.I. agents such as George Mattison. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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