Handy Andy (1934)

81 mins | Comedy | 27 July 1934

Director:

David Butler

Producer:

Sol M. Wurtzel

Cinematographer:

Arthur Miller

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

This film's working title was Merry Andrew and it was reviewed by DV and Box under that title. HR reviewed the film under the title Happy Andrew . The film was remade by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1940 as Young As You Feel (See Entry). Handy Andy marked the feature film debut of actor Robert ... More Less

This film's working title was Merry Andrew and it was reviewed by DV and Box under that title. HR reviewed the film under the title Happy Andrew . The film was remade by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1940 as Young As You Feel (See Entry). Handy Andy marked the feature film debut of actor Robert Taylor. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 May 1934.
---
Daily Variety
14 Mar 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
28 Apr 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Jun 34
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 34
p. 3.
International Photographer
1 Aug 34
p. 17.
Motion Picture Daily
1 May 34
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
6 May 34
p. 44.
New York Times
4 Aug 34
p. 14.
Variety
7 Aug 34
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Cat trainer
Still photog
STAND INS
Dance double for Will Rogers
Double for Conchita Montenegro
Double for Will Rogers
Double for Peggy Wood
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Merry Andrew by Lewis Beach (New York, 21 Jan 1929).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Roses in the Rain," music by Richard Whiting, lyrics by William Conselman.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Happy Andrew
Merry Andrew
Release Date:
27 July 1934
Production Date:
began 14 March 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
17 July 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4836
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
81
Length(in feet):
7,396
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2
SYNOPSIS

Andrew Yates, a hard-working, old-fashioned druggist, is badgered by his socially ambitious wife Ernestine to sell his shop and retire to a life of travel and parties. Andy is reluctant to give up his business, as it is not only his work but his hobby, through which he can help the town's poor citizens and see his friend "Doc" J. E. Burmeister. Andy finally acquiesces in order to get a respite from Ernestine's nagging, and sells his store to Charles Norcross, a businessman who owns a chain of modern drustores. Norcross promises Andy that the 40,000 shares of Norcross stock with which he pays him, in addition to $10,000 cash, will be very valuable someday. Andy is soon at loose ends and is desperate to keep himself occupied. In between avoiding Ernestine's singing lessons and helping their daughter Janice continue her romance with Doc's son Lloyd, of whom Ernestine disapproves, Andy makes desultory attempts to raise pigeons and grow flowers. Ernestine tries to get Andy interested in golf, but he uses his lesson to distract Howard, Norcross' son whom Ernestine wants Janice to marry, from pursuing Janice. Andy's boredom then drives him to construct a small pharmacy in his library, from which he can continue to fill prescriptions for the needy. Ernestine is at her wit's end when an invitation to attend Mardi Gras in New Orleans comes from her friends, Francis and Marie Beauregard. Andy despises the boorish Beauregards, but agrees to go in order to give Janice and Lloyd some time together without Ernestine's interference. In New Orleans, the parties and company prove as boring as Andy feared they would, and when ... +


Andrew Yates, a hard-working, old-fashioned druggist, is badgered by his socially ambitious wife Ernestine to sell his shop and retire to a life of travel and parties. Andy is reluctant to give up his business, as it is not only his work but his hobby, through which he can help the town's poor citizens and see his friend "Doc" J. E. Burmeister. Andy finally acquiesces in order to get a respite from Ernestine's nagging, and sells his store to Charles Norcross, a businessman who owns a chain of modern drustores. Norcross promises Andy that the 40,000 shares of Norcross stock with which he pays him, in addition to $10,000 cash, will be very valuable someday. Andy is soon at loose ends and is desperate to keep himself occupied. In between avoiding Ernestine's singing lessons and helping their daughter Janice continue her romance with Doc's son Lloyd, of whom Ernestine disapproves, Andy makes desultory attempts to raise pigeons and grow flowers. Ernestine tries to get Andy interested in golf, but he uses his lesson to distract Howard, Norcross' son whom Ernestine wants Janice to marry, from pursuing Janice. Andy's boredom then drives him to construct a small pharmacy in his library, from which he can continue to fill prescriptions for the needy. Ernestine is at her wit's end when an invitation to attend Mardi Gras in New Orleans comes from her friends, Francis and Marie Beauregard. Andy despises the boorish Beauregards, but agrees to go in order to give Janice and Lloyd some time together without Ernestine's interference. In New Orleans, the parties and company prove as boring as Andy feared they would, and when he refuses to attend a costume ball with Ernestine, she vows to go with Marie's gigolo friend, Pierre Martel. Meanwhile, Andy makes the acquaintance of druggist Henri Duval and his mistress Fleurette. After discussing the joys of the pharmacy business with Henri, Andy agrees to a scheme proposed by Henri and Fleurette to get back his shop. They tell him to turn around Ernestine's admonitions that he must learn to play by playing so hard that she will be thrilled for him to return to work. The trio attend the masquerade, and Andy, who wears a Tarzan costume, dances wildly with Fleurette, much to the dismay of Ernestine. After punching the arrogant Pierre, Andy spends the night in jail. Ernestine tries to take him home the next day, but Andy insists that he is having too much fun to ever leave. Ernestine finally convinces him to leave and, on the train home, she is shocked to read a newspaper article describing the collapse of Norcross stock. While Ernestine hides the newspaper from Andy, he hides from her a telegram from Janice saying that she has just married. The couple reveal their news to each other, and Ernestine laments her demand that Andy sell the shop and her insistence that Janice marry Howard. Ernestine vows to help Andy start over again, and the couple feel that their love for each other has been renewed. When they return home, Andy takes Ernestine to the drugstore and reveals that he sold the Norcross stock the day after he received it, and therefore had enough money to buy back the shop. Ernestine is also thrilled to learn that Janice married Lloyd, not Howard. After Andy promises that he will not work so hard, he reveals his final triumph--that he bought Norcross' luxurious car for Ernestine. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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