I Want You (1951)

101-102 mins | Drama | 1951

Director:

Mark Robson

Writer:

Irwin Shaw

Producer:

Samuel Goldwyn

Cinematographer:

Harry Stradling

Editor:

Daniel Mandell

Production Designer:

Richard Day

Production Company:

Samuel Goldwyn Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a 24 Jan 1951 Var article, Edward Newhouse’s The New Yorker short stories, on which the film was based, were written about Newhouse’s hometown of Edgerton, New York. Many of these stories were published in Newhouse's book Many Are Called: Forty-Two Short Stories (New York, 1951). One incident in the film in which an underage young man is sold a beer at the local diner on the eve of being sent to basic training is found in the story "The Wacky Afternoon."
       Modern sources noted that producer Samuel Goldwyn, Sr. was motivated to produce the film because his son, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., was drafted and served in the Korean War conflict in 1950. According to an Oct 1950 HR article, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. was to confer with draft director Lewis B. Hershey on script details. A 24 Jan 1951 Var article stated that Goldwyn Sr. rushed production on the film in hopes of capitalizing on the actual war, which took place from 1950--1953. Contemporary reviews repeatedly commended the film for its realistic portrait of an American family dealing with the crisis of the war. IWant You was the last Goldwyn film to be distributed by RKO Radio. His next film, Guys and Dolls (see above) was distributed by M-G-M. The film received an Academy Award nomination in the Sound Recording ... More Less

According to a 24 Jan 1951 Var article, Edward Newhouse’s The New Yorker short stories, on which the film was based, were written about Newhouse’s hometown of Edgerton, New York. Many of these stories were published in Newhouse's book Many Are Called: Forty-Two Short Stories (New York, 1951). One incident in the film in which an underage young man is sold a beer at the local diner on the eve of being sent to basic training is found in the story "The Wacky Afternoon."
       Modern sources noted that producer Samuel Goldwyn, Sr. was motivated to produce the film because his son, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., was drafted and served in the Korean War conflict in 1950. According to an Oct 1950 HR article, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. was to confer with draft director Lewis B. Hershey on script details. A 24 Jan 1951 Var article stated that Goldwyn Sr. rushed production on the film in hopes of capitalizing on the actual war, which took place from 1950--1953. Contemporary reviews repeatedly commended the film for its realistic portrait of an American family dealing with the crisis of the war. IWant You was the last Goldwyn film to be distributed by RKO Radio. His next film, Guys and Dolls (see above) was distributed by M-G-M. The film received an Academy Award nomination in the Sound Recording category. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
3 Nov 1951.
---
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1951
p. 3.
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1950.
---
Film Daily
1 Nov 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1950.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 1951
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Oct 1951
p. 3.
Los Angeles Daily News
23 Jun 1951.
---
Los Angeles Daily News
20 Jul 1951.
---
Los Angeles Daily News
19 Dec 1951.
---
Los Angeles Daily News
22 Dec 1951.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Jan 1951.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Dec 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Nov 1951
p. 1093.
New York Times
21 Dec 1951
p. 23.
New York Times
24 Dec 1951
p. 9.
Saturday Review
22 Dec 1951.
---
Variety
24 Jan 1951.
---
Variety
31 Oct 1951
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Samuel Goldwyn
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Head prop man
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd dir
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Script clerk
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Wacky Afternoon" in The New Yorker (Sep 1947) and other stories in New Yorker by Edward Newhouse.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1951
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 22 December 1951
Production Date:
25 June-early August 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Samuel Goldwyn Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
21 December 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1420
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
101-102
Length(in feet):
9,121
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15495
SYNOPSIS

In a small Connecticut town, devoted father George Kress, Sr. asks his boss, contractor Martin Greer, to classify his son as “indispensable” to the company so that George Kress, Jr. will not be drafted for the Korean War. Despite Kress’s pleadings, Martin decides he cannot grant the request. That same night, when Martin’s carefree younger brother Jack meets his love, Carrie Turner, at the train station upon her return from college. Although Carrie focuses her attentions on her parents, Judge and Mrs. Turner, she whispers to Jack to call her. The next day Martin asks his old friend, retired colonel Harvey Landrum, to work for him, but Harvey has decided his skills are needed in the war effort instead. That evening, when the two meet on the street, George, Jr. questions Martin about his three years of service and Martin invites him to a beer at the local café. Just as bartender Ned Iverson refuses to serve the underage George, Jr., a radio broadcast announces that military personnel are being called up to assist the South Koreans in their war against North Korea. Ned then serves George, Jr. a beer while the older men at the counter soberly watch. Martin returns home to his wife Nancy, who asks him to write a letter stating that Jack is “essential” to the family business so that he can avoid the draft. Later that night, Carrie explains to Jack that, although she has feelings for him, she wants to finish her studies and travel. Jack, interested only in romance, kisses her. When Carrie returns home, the judge voices his disapproval of Jack’s courtship, but Carrie asserts that Jack is just a diversion. ... +


In a small Connecticut town, devoted father George Kress, Sr. asks his boss, contractor Martin Greer, to classify his son as “indispensable” to the company so that George Kress, Jr. will not be drafted for the Korean War. Despite Kress’s pleadings, Martin decides he cannot grant the request. That same night, when Martin’s carefree younger brother Jack meets his love, Carrie Turner, at the train station upon her return from college. Although Carrie focuses her attentions on her parents, Judge and Mrs. Turner, she whispers to Jack to call her. The next day Martin asks his old friend, retired colonel Harvey Landrum, to work for him, but Harvey has decided his skills are needed in the war effort instead. That evening, when the two meet on the street, George, Jr. questions Martin about his three years of service and Martin invites him to a beer at the local café. Just as bartender Ned Iverson refuses to serve the underage George, Jr., a radio broadcast announces that military personnel are being called up to assist the South Koreans in their war against North Korea. Ned then serves George, Jr. a beer while the older men at the counter soberly watch. Martin returns home to his wife Nancy, who asks him to write a letter stating that Jack is “essential” to the family business so that he can avoid the draft. Later that night, Carrie explains to Jack that, although she has feelings for him, she wants to finish her studies and travel. Jack, interested only in romance, kisses her. When Carrie returns home, the judge voices his disapproval of Jack’s courtship, but Carrie asserts that Jack is just a diversion. In his study, Martin begins to write a letter exempting Jack from the draft, but cannot complete it after hearing a radio announcement that the American Air Force has made their first strike on North Korea. Consequently Jack is called before the draft board, among whose members is the judge, who lectures him on America’s obligation to protect freedom abroad. Jack is drafted, and on the night of his departure, voices his protest over being forced to serve in the military. Nancy retorts that, although she does not like war, she thinks Jack is acting like an irresponsible, pampered child. Nancy’s comments shock the family and Martin tells her they were unnecessary. Later, Carrie secretly visits Jack in the garage and when he blames the judge for his predicament, she defends her father by explaining that he still suffers pain from the shrapnel lodged in his leg during World War II. Jack apologizes to Carrie and then asks her to marry him, but she declines. That night, upset by Jack’s departure, his mother Sarah looks at all the weapons and military relics hanging on her living room walls and tells her husband Thomas to remove them, saying there will be “no more professional heroes in the house.” Thomas then admits to Sarah that the stories about his own heroic duty during WW II were all lies. Sometime later, Carrie, home from college for her birthday, explains to Nancy that she wants to try to make things work with Jack. Nancy tells her that Jack will soon be home on a ten day furlough before he is shipped overseas. Carrie decides to leave college and wait for Jack to return. When the judge protests her decision, Carrie argues that she wants to give her relationship with Jack a chance. Days later, Jack is returning home by train from basic training and meets Harvey, who has been fighting in the war. Harvey informs him that George, Jr. is missing in action. Consequently, when Harvey meets Martin at the town café, he finds Kress there as well, drunk and brooding over his son's disappearance. Harvey tries to recruit Martin for his outfit but Martin refuses his entreaties. Meanwhile Kress's cries grow louder and he stands up and loudly blames Martin for George, Jr.’s disappearance. Later that night, when Martin tells Nancy that he has changed his mind and feels he should serve, she reminds him that he did serve for four years and that she suffered. Soon after, on the night Martin is being shipped out, Jack and Carrie espouse their love for each other and Thomas admits to Martin that he lied about his heroism during his service. Days later, Carrie and Jack marry before Jack is shipped out and the judge jokingly admits that when he was at their age, he did not listen to his father either. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.