The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Story (1951)

60 mins | Documentary | March 1951

Writer:

Herman Hoffman

Producer:

Herman Hoffmann

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Although reviews and studio publicity refer to the film as The M-G-M Story , the opening title cards read: "Leo the Lion presents The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Story ." Leo the Lion was the M-G-M mascot and part of the corporate logo. All scenes featuring Dore Schary and Lionel Barrymore are in Technicolor, although the previews are divided between black and white and color. According to information in copyright records, M-G-M press releases and news items, the film was distributed free to exhibitors to exploit M-G-M's upcoming pictures. As explained by Lionel Barrymore in his introduction, the film was a follow-up to Some of the Best: 25 Years of Motion Picture Leadership , a promotional film produced by M-G-M in 1949 to celebrate the twenty-five anniversary of the corporation. Whereas the earlier picture had shown footage from popular M-G-M pictures of the past, The Metro-Goldwyn-Metro Story previewed films that were to be released by the studio in 1951.
       According to Var news items, the picture was initially forty-five minutes in length and premiered at the Nov 1950 Theatre Owners of American convention in Houston, TX. Although technical problems relating to the fact that the film was made on two prints, one sound and one pictorial, at first prevented the film from being exhibited nationwide, an updated version with additional previews was made available in Mar 1951, featuring previews of fifty-eight M-G-M stars in 25 films. According to news items and press releases, the idea of The M-G-M Story originated with exhibitor and interstate circuit president Robert J. O'Donnell, who offered the idea to Loew's president Nicholas M. ... More Less

Although reviews and studio publicity refer to the film as The M-G-M Story , the opening title cards read: "Leo the Lion presents The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Story ." Leo the Lion was the M-G-M mascot and part of the corporate logo. All scenes featuring Dore Schary and Lionel Barrymore are in Technicolor, although the previews are divided between black and white and color. According to information in copyright records, M-G-M press releases and news items, the film was distributed free to exhibitors to exploit M-G-M's upcoming pictures. As explained by Lionel Barrymore in his introduction, the film was a follow-up to Some of the Best: 25 Years of Motion Picture Leadership , a promotional film produced by M-G-M in 1949 to celebrate the twenty-five anniversary of the corporation. Whereas the earlier picture had shown footage from popular M-G-M pictures of the past, The Metro-Goldwyn-Metro Story previewed films that were to be released by the studio in 1951.
       According to Var news items, the picture was initially forty-five minutes in length and premiered at the Nov 1950 Theatre Owners of American convention in Houston, TX. Although technical problems relating to the fact that the film was made on two prints, one sound and one pictorial, at first prevented the film from being exhibited nationwide, an updated version with additional previews was made available in Mar 1951, featuring previews of fifty-eight M-G-M stars in 25 films. According to news items and press releases, the idea of The M-G-M Story originated with exhibitor and interstate circuit president Robert J. O'Donnell, who offered the idea to Loew's president Nicholas M. Schenk. Schenk turned the project over to William F. Rodgers, vice-president of sales, who asked Schary to outline the film. The written closing of the film featured M-G-M's popular tagline of the 1950s, "Movies Are Better than Ever." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1950.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 51
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
21 Mar 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald
17 Mar 51
p. 20.
The Exhibitor
28 Mar 51
p. 3045.
Variety
8 Nov 1950.
---
Variety
17 Nov 1950.
---
Variety
14 Mar 51
p. 7.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Presenting
Mr. Dore Schary
Introduced by
Mr. Lionel Barrymore

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Presenting
Mr. Dore Schary
Introduced by
Mr. Lionel Barrymore
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
WRITER
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOURCES
MUSIC
"There's No Business Like Show Business" by Irving Berlin.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The M-G-M Story
Release Date:
March 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 March 1951
Copyright Number:
LP948
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
col with b&w seq
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
60
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Actor Lionel Barrymore discusses the film the audience is about to see, a preview of the films that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer will release in 1951. Barrymore then introduces Dore Schary, who is in his office on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's Culver City, California lot. Studio head Schary explains that M-G-M strives for a consistency of quality in its output, while at the same time producing a wide variety of motion pictures. Schary then states that the audience will see previews of the studio's prestigious Technicolor films after watching several previews of future black and white films. Black and white films previewed include Go for Broke ; Inside Straight ; Father of the Bride ; The Red Badge of Courage ; Three Guys Named Mike and People in Love [released as Night Into Morning ]. Schary then introduces previews of the studio's Technicolor films, including Across the Wide Missouri ; Mr. Imperium ; Show Boat ; Excuse My Dust ; Pandora and the Flying Dutchman ; The Great Caruso ; Vengeance Valley ; An American in Paris ; King Solomon's Mines and Royal Wedding . Schary next says that the last preview is of the most prestigious film of the last ten years, the costliest film ever made, Quo Vadis , a picture shot entirely in Italy and featuring a cast of tens of thousands. After the final preview, Schary thanks the audience, the production crews and stars from the motion pictures and says that though hard work, making movies is lots of fun. After Schary finishes speaking, ... +


Actor Lionel Barrymore discusses the film the audience is about to see, a preview of the films that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer will release in 1951. Barrymore then introduces Dore Schary, who is in his office on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's Culver City, California lot. Studio head Schary explains that M-G-M strives for a consistency of quality in its output, while at the same time producing a wide variety of motion pictures. Schary then states that the audience will see previews of the studio's prestigious Technicolor films after watching several previews of future black and white films. Black and white films previewed include Go for Broke ; Inside Straight ; Father of the Bride ; The Red Badge of Courage ; Three Guys Named Mike and People in Love [released as Night Into Morning ]. Schary then introduces previews of the studio's Technicolor films, including Across the Wide Missouri ; Mr. Imperium ; Show Boat ; Excuse My Dust ; Pandora and the Flying Dutchman ; The Great Caruso ; Vengeance Valley ; An American in Paris ; King Solomon's Mines and Royal Wedding . Schary next says that the last preview is of the most prestigious film of the last ten years, the costliest film ever made, Quo Vadis , a picture shot entirely in Italy and featuring a cast of tens of thousands. After the final preview, Schary thanks the audience, the production crews and stars from the motion pictures and says that though hard work, making movies is lots of fun. After Schary finishes speaking, a montage of stars of the films featured is shown. Some of the stars included are Clark Gable, Elizabeth Taylor, Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner, Spencer Tracy, Kathryn Grayson, Ethel Barrymore, Fred Astaire, Howard Keel, Mario Lanza, Carleton Carpenter, Debbie Reynolds, Greer Garson and Red Skelton. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Compilation


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.