Two Dollar Bettor (1951)

71-73 mins | Drama | 1951

Director:

Edward L. Cahn

Producer:

Edward L. Cahn

Cinematographer:

Charles Van Enger

Editor:

Sherman A. Rose

Production Designer:

Boris Leven

Production Company:

Jack Broder Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

As noted in reviews, the title of Howard Emmett Roger's original story was The Far Turn . According to a 25 Apr 1951 HR news item, John Ireland and Mary Hatcher were originally cast as leads in the film, but were replaced by John Litel and Marie Windsor. A Lux Video Theatre production of The Two Dollar Bettor was broadcast on 13 Oct 1955, which starred Gene Lockhart as "John ... More Less

As noted in reviews, the title of Howard Emmett Roger's original story was The Far Turn . According to a 25 Apr 1951 HR news item, John Ireland and Mary Hatcher were originally cast as leads in the film, but were replaced by John Litel and Marie Windsor. A Lux Video Theatre production of The Two Dollar Bettor was broadcast on 13 Oct 1955, which starred Gene Lockhart as "John Hewitt." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Sep 1951.
---
Daily Variety
10 Apr 1951.
---
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1951
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Oct 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 1951
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1951
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1951
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 1951
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
21 Sep 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Oct 1951
p. 1050.
Showmen's Trade Reviews
29 Sep 1951.
---
Variety
26 Sep 1951
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jack Broder Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story and scr
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Handknits and fashions by
MUSIC
Mus comp and dir
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
SOURCES
SONGS
"Querido" by Jeanne Logan.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
1951
Production Date:
23 April--early May 1951 at Hal Roach Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Jack Broder Productions
Copyright Date:
29 August 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1684
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71-73
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15306
SYNOPSIS

Despite his initial reluctance, family man and widower John Hewitt places a two-dollar bet at his first visit to the race track and wins. With brother-in-law George Irwin’s guidance and racing statistics, John continues betting and wins a down payment on new car for his daughters, seventeen-year-old Nancy and eighteen-year-old Diane. As comptroller of the Langston Bank, John earns a moderate living and has acquired some savings. Wanting to provide more for his daughters, John begins to place regular bets with bookie Krueger and arranges to meet Krueger’s associate, Mary Slate, each week to settle his account. Over the next few months, John’s obsession with the track grows as he successfully bets on jockey Osborne. When Osborne is injured; however, John’s winning streak ends and he soon loses most of his savings. One evening at the Hewitt house, while Nancy and Diane entertain guests with song and dance, Mary comes to the house to collect a gambling debt. When John cannot pay, Mary promises to placate Krueger and meet John the next week, then seductively insinuates that she and John’s partnership could be romantic. One night, while the girls are out with teenagers Chuck Norlinger and Chester, their doting grandmother, Sarah Irwin, teases John that he wants his daughters to marry for money, but John assures her he wants the girls to marry for love. Days later, A desperate John steals from the comptroller’s fund to pay Mary the outstanding debt. Meanwhile, Diane runs into bank president Carleton Adams’ son Phillip, who is on leave from Princeton. Charmed by Diane, Phillip insists on taking her out to lunch and a serious romance soon develops. Increasingly depressed about his financial ... +


Despite his initial reluctance, family man and widower John Hewitt places a two-dollar bet at his first visit to the race track and wins. With brother-in-law George Irwin’s guidance and racing statistics, John continues betting and wins a down payment on new car for his daughters, seventeen-year-old Nancy and eighteen-year-old Diane. As comptroller of the Langston Bank, John earns a moderate living and has acquired some savings. Wanting to provide more for his daughters, John begins to place regular bets with bookie Krueger and arranges to meet Krueger’s associate, Mary Slate, each week to settle his account. Over the next few months, John’s obsession with the track grows as he successfully bets on jockey Osborne. When Osborne is injured; however, John’s winning streak ends and he soon loses most of his savings. One evening at the Hewitt house, while Nancy and Diane entertain guests with song and dance, Mary comes to the house to collect a gambling debt. When John cannot pay, Mary promises to placate Krueger and meet John the next week, then seductively insinuates that she and John’s partnership could be romantic. One night, while the girls are out with teenagers Chuck Norlinger and Chester, their doting grandmother, Sarah Irwin, teases John that he wants his daughters to marry for money, but John assures her he wants the girls to marry for love. Days later, A desperate John steals from the comptroller’s fund to pay Mary the outstanding debt. Meanwhile, Diane runs into bank president Carleton Adams’ son Phillip, who is on leave from Princeton. Charmed by Diane, Phillip insists on taking her out to lunch and a serious romance soon develops. Increasingly depressed about his financial problems, John continues to steal from the bank to pay for his gambling habit. Aware that a comptroller’s fund audit is scheduled in three months, John admits to George that he has stolen over $14,000 to pay his gambling losses. When George graciously offers to loan John the money once he receives his bonus, John promises to stop betting on horses. Soon after Diane and Phillip announce their engagement, Carleton promises to promote John to the high-paying general manager position. Concerned that an audit arranged for the following week to finalize the promotion could threaten Diane’s plans to marry, John turns to gambling again after he learns that Osborne has returned to the track. Taking $2,000 for the comptroller’s fund, John attempts to place the bet on the New Orleans Bayou Handicap with Krueger. When Krueger will only place $1,000 on the horse, John flies to New Orleans to place the remaining $1,000 himself. At the track, John alarms bystanders with his furious screams for the jockey to spur his horse Great Day to the finish line. When the horse loses, John is despondent that he has ruined his daughters’ future. The next day, after John settles the $1,000 bet with Mary, she sympathetically offers to ask her brother, Rick Bowers, for a hot tip on the track to help him. Later at her apartment, Mary deviously plots with Rick, who is actually her boyfriend, to trick John into embezzling another $20,000. Meeting John at a local hotel, Mary introduces Rick as a sports promoter who fixes races. John is impressed when Rick confidently places $100,000 on horse Rickety Rack over the phone, and he agrees to bet $20,000 on the same horse. Early results reveal Rickety Rack has won, but when John tries to collect, he discovers that Rick has checked out of the hotel. Realizing he has been duped, John arms himself with a gun and arrives at Mary’s apartment just as Rick and Mary are leaving. When John holds them at gunpoint, she hands $10,000 to him. Rick then shoots and wounds John, prompting him to return the fire and kill both Rick and Mary. John, mortally wounded, then staggers to his car and drives to the Adamses’ home. While Carleton sends for a doctor, John gives him the $20,000 and confesses to stealing an additional $16,000 from the bank. Tortured by the disgrace he has brought upon his daughters, John’s dying words attest to his girls’s innocence and their strength of character. Carleton knows that John only wanted to provide for his children, so when the police arrive, he fabricates a courageous story to salvage both John and his daughters’ reputation. He claims that he asked John to bring the $20,000 to him. As John was delivering the money, he was held up by two thieves, whom he was forced to kill in self-defense. Months later, Diane and Phillip are married and plan to invite Nancy to live with them. Having only Carleton’s heroic tale of their father’s tragic death, Diane exclaims, “Dad would have been proud of us, just as proud as I am of him.”
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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