Glory Alley (1952)

78-79 mins | Drama | 6 June 1952

Director:

Raoul Walsh

Writer:

Art Cohn

Producer:

Nicholas Nayfack

Cinematographer:

William Daniels

Editor:

Gene Ruggiero

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Malcolm Brown

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

In the opening credits, Louis Armstrong's credit reads: "Louis (Satchmo) Armstrong and His Trumpet." The character played by Leslie Caron is listed in the onscreen credits as “Angela,” but in the film she is only called “Angie.” Although the HR review of Glory Alley listed a running time of 84 minutes, this was probably an error as all other reviews and copyright materials list a running time of either 78 or 79 minutes. According to a HR news item, actor Jeff Richard was assigned a top role in the picture, but he did not appear. Actor Larry Keating is seen briefly in a scene in the “Punch Bowl,” but has no dialogue and his role, listed as “Philip Louis Bennson” on the CBCS, was apparently cut before the film was released. Actors Jack Gargan and Emile Meyer, listed respectively as “President Truman” and “General” on the CBCS, were also cut from the film. According to a 12 Mar 1952 HR “Rambling Reporter” item, the sequence featuring Gargan showed the president awarding “Socks Barbarosa” his Congressional Medal of Honor. Although Socks speaks about the event, the scene was not in the released film.
       Other HR news items include actor Tommy Walker and dancer Marilyn Russell in the “Jolie Jacqueline” number, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. An unidentified, but contemporary newspaper item noted that George Hormel II, scion of the Hormel meat-packing family and husband of Caron, was to be seen as a patron in the “Chez Bozo,” but his appearance has not been confirmed. Glory Alley ... More Less

In the opening credits, Louis Armstrong's credit reads: "Louis (Satchmo) Armstrong and His Trumpet." The character played by Leslie Caron is listed in the onscreen credits as “Angela,” but in the film she is only called “Angie.” Although the HR review of Glory Alley listed a running time of 84 minutes, this was probably an error as all other reviews and copyright materials list a running time of either 78 or 79 minutes. According to a HR news item, actor Jeff Richard was assigned a top role in the picture, but he did not appear. Actor Larry Keating is seen briefly in a scene in the “Punch Bowl,” but has no dialogue and his role, listed as “Philip Louis Bennson” on the CBCS, was apparently cut before the film was released. Actors Jack Gargan and Emile Meyer, listed respectively as “President Truman” and “General” on the CBCS, were also cut from the film. According to a 12 Mar 1952 HR “Rambling Reporter” item, the sequence featuring Gargan showed the president awarding “Socks Barbarosa” his Congressional Medal of Honor. Although Socks speaks about the event, the scene was not in the released film.
       Other HR news items include actor Tommy Walker and dancer Marilyn Russell in the “Jolie Jacqueline” number, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. An unidentified, but contemporary newspaper item noted that George Hormel II, scion of the Hormel meat-packing family and husband of Caron, was to be seen as a patron in the “Chez Bozo,” but his appearance has not been confirmed. Glory Alley marked the first onscreen singing role for Caron, and the first film that Raoul Walsh directed at M-G-M since 1935's Baby Face Harrington (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). In addition Armstrong's numbers in the released film, another song, "It's a Most Unusual Day," by Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson was recorded by cut. That number, plus several songs from the film were included in a CD-anthology album entitled "Now You Has Jazz: Louis Armstrong at M-G-M," released in 1997. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 May 1952.
---
Daily Variety
16 May 1952
p. 3.
Film Daily
21 May 1952
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 1951
p. 4, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1951
p. 4, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Nov 1951
p. 3, 9.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Nov 1951
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Dec 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 1952
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 May 1952
p. 3.
Los Angeles Daily News
30 Jul 1952
p. 58.
Los Angeles Examiner
4 Jun 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 May 1952
p. 1373.
New York Times
29 Jul 1952
p. 17.
New York Times
30 Jul 1952
p. 20.
Variety
21 May 1952
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss Caron's cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
Vocal coach
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Mont seq
DANCE
PRODUCTION MISC
Fight scenes staged by
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Oh Didn't He Ramble and "Flee as a Bird" by W. C. Handy
"South Rampart Street Parade" by Ray Bauduc and Bob Haggart.
SONGS
"Glory Alley," music by Jay Livingston, lyrics by Mack David
"St. Louis Blues," music and lyrics by W. C. Handy
"Jolie Jacqueline," music and lyrics by Joseph Wolf Warfield
+
SONGS
"Glory Alley," music by Jay Livingston, lyrics by Mack David
"St. Louis Blues," music and lyrics by W. C. Handy
"Jolie Jacqueline," music and lyrics by Joseph Wolf Warfield
"That's What the Man Said" music and lyrics by Willard Robison.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 June 1952
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 4 June 1952
Production Date:
mid November--mid December 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 March 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1733
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78-79
Length(in feet):
7,123
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15741
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

As popular New Orleans-Times Picayune columnist Gabe Jordan is about to retire, he tells his successor, Dan, to find stories about real people, especially those on the section of Bourbon Street called “Glory Alley.” Gabe then relates his greatest story: Boxer Socks Barbarosa has finally earned a shot at the title and is about to fight champion Terry Waulker when he suddenly bolts from the ring and runs to his dressing room. Socks’ manager, Peppi Donnato, thinks Socks must be ill, but Socks angrily insists that he simply wants to give up the ring. When asked by his blind friend, the Judge, what his daughter Angie will think, Socks says she will understand, but accidentally knocks down the Judge. Later, in the deserted arena, Socks, who always wears a hat, is taunted by Waulker, whom he knocks out then recites a ten count. As Socks walks the streets, he hears talk and reads headlines of his cowardice, then goes to see Angie at the Chez Bozo, the club where she dances. Angie loves Socks but does not understand why he decided to quit the ring so abruptly. Socks then goes to the Punch Bowl bar to apologize to the Judge, but the Judge, a former jeweler, rebukes Socks, saying that he is just a flawed diamond. Peppi, who is more understanding, says that he is buying the Punch Bowl and wants Socks to be his partner. Socks declines, even though Peppi gives him the contract to his other fighter, Newsboy Addams. One morning, a hung-over Socks is awakened by Sal “The Pig” Nichols, a local boss ... +


As popular New Orleans-Times Picayune columnist Gabe Jordan is about to retire, he tells his successor, Dan, to find stories about real people, especially those on the section of Bourbon Street called “Glory Alley.” Gabe then relates his greatest story: Boxer Socks Barbarosa has finally earned a shot at the title and is about to fight champion Terry Waulker when he suddenly bolts from the ring and runs to his dressing room. Socks’ manager, Peppi Donnato, thinks Socks must be ill, but Socks angrily insists that he simply wants to give up the ring. When asked by his blind friend, the Judge, what his daughter Angie will think, Socks says she will understand, but accidentally knocks down the Judge. Later, in the deserted arena, Socks, who always wears a hat, is taunted by Waulker, whom he knocks out then recites a ten count. As Socks walks the streets, he hears talk and reads headlines of his cowardice, then goes to see Angie at the Chez Bozo, the club where she dances. Angie loves Socks but does not understand why he decided to quit the ring so abruptly. Socks then goes to the Punch Bowl bar to apologize to the Judge, but the Judge, a former jeweler, rebukes Socks, saying that he is just a flawed diamond. Peppi, who is more understanding, says that he is buying the Punch Bowl and wants Socks to be his partner. Socks declines, even though Peppi gives him the contract to his other fighter, Newsboy Addams. One morning, a hung-over Socks is awakened by Sal “The Pig” Nichols, a local boss who wants him to have Newsboy throw a fight. Socks refuses and later accepts Peppi’s offer to become a relief bartender. Soon Socks begins selling tickets to a raffle, which offers a turkey and Newsboy’s contract as the grand prize. Pig, who has bought a number of the tickets, wins the raffle, and is infuriated when Socks reports that Newsboy’s contract is worthless, as he has been drafted. When Socks tells Angie that he, too, is going into the Army, she pledges to wait for him. In Korea, Socks becomes an excellent soldier and is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. When Socks returns to New Orleans, he is hailed as a hero by everyone except the Judge, who orders him to stay away from Angie. Although she agrees to keep seeing Socks in secret, Angie says that she cannot leave her dependent father. For the next few weeks, Socks enjoys being a local hero, but soon the accolades fade and he becomes so embittered that he almost returns his medal. Socks tells Peppi that he would like to open his own bar but cannot get a lease without giving Pig a ten percent cut. A short time later, as the Judge is sitting in the Punch Bowl, he is approached by noted Milwaukee eye surgeon Dr. Robert Ardley. Although not promising a definite cure, Ardley, who is lecturing in New Orleans, asks the Judge to come see him. The Judge is suspicious, and insists that he has no money for an operation, but Ardley says that at his clinic he only takes patients who cannot pay. The next day, the Judge and his friend, Shadow Johnson, visit Ardley, and the Judge says that he wants the operation, even though there is only a fifty-fifty chance of success. When they run into Socks in the doctor’s building, the Judge is suspicious, and when he later discovers that Socks is from Milwaukee, he angrily confronts him. Socks denies arranging the operation, but Peppi confirms it, and the Judge denounces Socks as “a gutter rat.” Now even Angie cannot forgive her father, and reveals that the money they live on is not from a legacy from her Belgian grandfather but her earnings at the Chez Bozo. Although shattered because he had thought that Angie worked nights at a hospital, he secretly goes to see her perform. Outside the club, Socks tells Pig he will give him a ten percent cut of the bar for his help in securing a lease, but Pig knocks him down and calls Socks a welsher. Just then, Shadow arrives, saying that the Judge will have the eye surgery After the operation, Ardley goes to say goodbye to the Judge because he has to return to Milwaukee. The Judge promises to pay him, but Ardley refuses, saying that Socks has taken care of it and for years has anonymously sent money to the clinic. Ardley also relates that, years ago, his father had sewn fifty-nine stitches in Socks’s head after Socks’s brutish father murdered his mother and left Socks for dead. That night, when Angie and Socks meet, he tells her what happened to him as a child and relates that it was the bright lights of the arena that made him flee before the championship bout. Because other children had taunted him for his head scars, he secretly feared that everyone would see the still visible scars and ridicule him. Angie tenderly assures him that there is no reason to be ashamed and he only needs the courage to take off his hat. Some time later, the Judge returns to the Punch Bowl, although the operation was not a success, he says that, thanks to Socks, he will never really be blind again. When Socks comes into the bar, not wearing his hat, he sees the Judge smiling and embraces Angie. With his story now complete, Gabe reveals that Socks returned to boxing and won the championship after only eight fights. Gabe and Dan then go to the Punch Bowl, where Peppi, Socks, the Judge and Angie are enjoying one another’s company. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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