The Glass Web (1953)

81 mins | Mystery | November 1953

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HISTORY

The film's working title was Spin the Glass Web . According to an Oct 1952 DV news item, when Universal purchased Max Simon Ehrlich's novel, it was originally assigned to Anton Leader to produce. A Jun 1953 HR article stated that Barbara Rush was to star. The film was released in both 3-D and flat versions. The HR review notes that audience members complained about the discomfort of the 3-D glasses, as well as the new intermissions that occurred when reels were changed. According to a Jun 1952 HR "Rambling Reporter" item, actress Tracey Roberts was added to the cast, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. On 15 Nov 1956, Lux Video Theatre broadcast a version of the film starring George Nader and Dan ... More Less

The film's working title was Spin the Glass Web . According to an Oct 1952 DV news item, when Universal purchased Max Simon Ehrlich's novel, it was originally assigned to Anton Leader to produce. A Jun 1953 HR article stated that Barbara Rush was to star. The film was released in both 3-D and flat versions. The HR review notes that audience members complained about the discomfort of the 3-D glasses, as well as the new intermissions that occurred when reels were changed. According to a Jun 1952 HR "Rambling Reporter" item, actress Tracey Roberts was added to the cast, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. On 15 Nov 1956, Lux Video Theatre broadcast a version of the film starring George Nader and Dan O'Herlihy. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Oct 1953.
---
Daily Variety
24 Oct 1952.
---
Daily Variety
13 Oct 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
23 Oct 53
p. 10.
Hollywood Citizen-News
30 Dec 1953.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 53
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 53
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 53
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 53
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Oct 53
p. 2029.
New York Times
12 Nov 53
p. 37.
Variety
14 Oct 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Spin the Glass Web by Max Simon Ehrlich (New York, 1952).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Spin the Glass Web
Release Date:
November 1953
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 11 November 1953
Production Date:
late June--mid July 1953
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
2 November 1953
Copyright Number:
LP3254
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
3-D
Duration(in mins):
81
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16669
SYNOPSIS

After he finishes broadcasting an episode of the television show Crime of the Week , producer Dave Markson discovers that sponsor Colonial Cigarettes is undecided about whether to continue funding the program. Writer Don Newell, who has lied to his wife Louise that he is working that evening with researcher Henry Hayes, asks Henry to back his story. Henry agrees, but as soon as Don leaves, hints to Dave that Don is having personal problems and should have his workload reduced. Later, Henry brings beautiful actress Paula Ranier to his home. Although she accepts his gifts and attempts to improve her social graces, as soon as he kisses her, she remembers an important appointment and leaves. Her appointment turns out to be Don, who ended an affair with her months earlier. She now informs him coolly that she wants $2,500 in exchange for a pair of his pajamas with a name tag sewn inside, and he is forced to agree to deliver the money on Friday night. Don visits a bar and recalls his romance with Paula: She arranges "chance" meetings with him repeatedly until he falls for her. For months, she lives off his monetary gifts until finally, after a trip together, his guilt overwhelms him and he breaks it off. In the office on Friday, the exacting Henry quibbles that Don's latest script is missing some minute details. While Don empties his family's bank accounts of $2,500, Paula's husband, Fred Abbott, asks to visit her, but she threatens to turn him in to the police if he does. That night, Paula finds Henry at her door and, confident in her newfound financial freedom, announces that she ... +


After he finishes broadcasting an episode of the television show Crime of the Week , producer Dave Markson discovers that sponsor Colonial Cigarettes is undecided about whether to continue funding the program. Writer Don Newell, who has lied to his wife Louise that he is working that evening with researcher Henry Hayes, asks Henry to back his story. Henry agrees, but as soon as Don leaves, hints to Dave that Don is having personal problems and should have his workload reduced. Later, Henry brings beautiful actress Paula Ranier to his home. Although she accepts his gifts and attempts to improve her social graces, as soon as he kisses her, she remembers an important appointment and leaves. Her appointment turns out to be Don, who ended an affair with her months earlier. She now informs him coolly that she wants $2,500 in exchange for a pair of his pajamas with a name tag sewn inside, and he is forced to agree to deliver the money on Friday night. Don visits a bar and recalls his romance with Paula: She arranges "chance" meetings with him repeatedly until he falls for her. For months, she lives off his monetary gifts until finally, after a trip together, his guilt overwhelms him and he breaks it off. In the office on Friday, the exacting Henry quibbles that Don's latest script is missing some minute details. While Don empties his family's bank accounts of $2,500, Paula's husband, Fred Abbott, asks to visit her, but she threatens to turn him in to the police if he does. That night, Paula finds Henry at her door and, confident in her newfound financial freedom, announces that she has always considered him a disgusting bore. As he is begging her not to leave him, Don arrives outside but, hearing voices in Paula's apartment, hides in the stairway. Henry leaves in a fury, but a group of partygoers block the stairs, and by the time Don can enter Paula's apartment, he finds her strangled. Covering his fingers, he locates his pajamas, tears out the name tag, and races out. Two drunken partygoers, however, detain him at the elevator and pull out his handkerchief, dropping the name tag onto the floor. He escapes to the bar, and although he quickly realizes the name tag is missing, a crowd of policemen at Paula's apartment keep him from returning. The next morning, Henry watches the police investigate Fred, calling it "research" for the next Crime of the Week . Although police lieutenant Mike Stevens steps on Don's name tag, he throws it away without reading it. At home, Don is agitated until he hears on the radio that Fred has been arrested, after which he happily returns his money to the bank. At work, Henry convinces Dave to do the next show about Paula's murder. A horrified Don is forced to write the script, and although Henry, who hopes to replace Don as head writer, secretly starts on his own version, Don soon turns in his best script ever. On the morning of the show, Henry visits Don at home and presents him with a pair of pajamas. As a frightened Don drives Henry to the office, Henry lies that Don's reaction proves him guilty of Paula's murder, as do his spot-on description of her apartment and the withdrawal and re-deposit of $2,500. He then demands that Don quit his job if he does not want to go to jail. They return in time for the show, during which Mike and his assistant watch the employees, hoping to learn more about Paula's connection to them. Don asks Louise to join them immediately, and in the middle of the show, suddenly recognizes the music Henry has picked out as the same song Paula was playing on the night she died. He pulls Louise into the hallway and confesses the whole story to her. Although upset, she nonetheless agrees to help him. The two then uncover Henry's script, which is full of the kind of minute details that Henry's favors but which now prove him to be intimately involved with Paula. Henry listens outside the door as Don deduces that the researcher killed Paula. While Mike, noticing both men are missing, begins to search the building, Don and Louise race to find him but are misdirected to the studio by Henry, who then pulls out a gun. Don surreptitiously turns on the camera, so that Henry's subsequent confession is broadcast on a television screen in the editing room where Mike is sitting. Mike bursts into the studio with his detectives just in time to shoot Henry as he raises his gun. Before dying, Henry tells Don the story will make a wonderful script--but advises him not to forget the details. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.