White Witch Doctor (1953)

95-96 mins | Adventure | July 1953

Director:

Henry Hathaway

Producer:

Otto Lang

Cinematographer:

Leon Shamroy

Editor:

James B. Clark

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Mark-Lee Kirk

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to a Dec 1950 HR news item, Louise A. Stinetorf's best-selling novel was to appear in condensed form in Ladies' Home Journal. According to a Sep 1951 HR news item, writer Michael Wilson had been working on the screenplay for White Witch Doctor but was laid off by Twentieth Century-Fox after being subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee. The extent of Wilson's contribution to the completed picture, if any, has not been determined. A 4 Nov 1952 HR news item noted that Roy Baker, who directed the film's African background footage, was originally set to direct the entire film but "contracted an intestinal virus" during his trip to Africa. For the majority of filming, Baker was replaced by Henry Hathaway. When cinematographer Leon Shamroy fell ill, he was temporarily replaced by Joe MacDonald, according to a Dec 1952 HR news item.
       Jay Brooks and William Washington are included in the cast by HR news items, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A 24 Oct 1952 HR news item announced that Roland Winters had been added to the cast, but he does not appear in the completed picture. Lillian West, who plays "Dr. Mary," is seen only as a corpse. In addition to the extensive background filming in the Belgian Congo, portions of the film were shot on location at the studio's ranch in Calabasas, CA. Robert Mitchum was borrowed from RKO for the production. According to studio publicity, technical advisor Dr. Conway T. Wharton, a longtime missionary in Africa, taught ...

More Less

According to a Dec 1950 HR news item, Louise A. Stinetorf's best-selling novel was to appear in condensed form in Ladies' Home Journal. According to a Sep 1951 HR news item, writer Michael Wilson had been working on the screenplay for White Witch Doctor but was laid off by Twentieth Century-Fox after being subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee. The extent of Wilson's contribution to the completed picture, if any, has not been determined. A 4 Nov 1952 HR news item noted that Roy Baker, who directed the film's African background footage, was originally set to direct the entire film but "contracted an intestinal virus" during his trip to Africa. For the majority of filming, Baker was replaced by Henry Hathaway. When cinematographer Leon Shamroy fell ill, he was temporarily replaced by Joe MacDonald, according to a Dec 1952 HR news item.
       Jay Brooks and William Washington are included in the cast by HR news items, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A 24 Oct 1952 HR news item announced that Roland Winters had been added to the cast, but he does not appear in the completed picture. Lillian West, who plays "Dr. Mary," is seen only as a corpse. In addition to the extensive background filming in the Belgian Congo, portions of the film were shot on location at the studio's ranch in Calabasas, CA. Robert Mitchum was borrowed from RKO for the production. According to studio publicity, technical advisor Dr. Conway T. Wharton, a longtime missionary in Africa, taught the cast Tcheluba, the African language spoken in the film. Members of the Bakuba, Wagania, Mangbetu and Pygmy tribes appeared in the African footage, according to studio publicity. A modern source reports that Tim Wallace served as Robert Mitchum's stand-in. The picture marked the American film debut of Nigerian actor Mashood Ajala.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
1 Oct 1951
p. 394
Box Office
20 Jun 1953
---
Daily Variety
15 Jun 1953
p. 3
Film Daily
24 Jun 1953
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
26 Dec 1950
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1951
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 1951
p. 1, 4
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1952
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 1952
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 1952
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1952
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 1952
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 1952
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
19 Nov 1952
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 1952
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
28 Nov 1952
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 1952
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 1952
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 1952
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1952
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 1952
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 1952
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
31 Dec 1952
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jan 1953
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 1953
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 1953
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 1953
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 1953
p. 3
Los Angeles Times
2 Jul 1953
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Jun 1953
p. 1877
New York Times
19 Oct 1952
---
New York Times
2 Jul 1953
p. 19
Newsweek
20 Jul 1953
---
Time
17 Aug 1953
---
Variety
17 Jun 1953
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Erich Von Stroheim Jr.
Asst dir
Asst dir
Art Lueker
Asst dir
Loc dir
2d unit dir
Loc 2d unit dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Joe MacDonald
Fill-in dir of photog
Loc dir of photog
Loc dir of photog
Loc cam op
Loc grip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv and language coach
Loc prod mgr
Loc crew
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel White Witch Doctor by Louise A. Stinetorf (Philadelphia, 1950).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
July 1953
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 1 Jul 1953
Production Date:
1 Dec 1952--mid Jan 1953
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
30 June 1953
LP2789
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
95-96
Length(in feet):
8,628
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16224
SYNOPSIS

In 1907, hunter John "Lonni" Douglas, who has spent his life in the Belgian Congo struggling to earn money, is irritated by the arrival of Ellen Burton, a beautiful nurse who has come to the Congo to work with missionary doctor Mary. The cynical Lonni is suspicious of Ellen's motives for coming to Africa, while Ellen is annoyed by Lonni's male chauvinism. Although Lonni warns Ellen that Dr. Mary has traveled up the Congo River to help the victims of a fever epidemic, Ellen is determined to join her. That evening, fed up with capturing animals for zoos, Lonni tells his Dutch business partner, Huysman, that he is quitting. Huysman, who has spent seven years searching for gold, urges Lonni to remain and shows him a necklace made of gold nuggets, which supposedly came from the region where Dr. Mary is currently working. Huysman states that by escorting Ellen to Mary, Lonni will have a "passport" into the area, although Lonni is worried about traveling so close to the homeland of the mysterious and violent Bakuba tribe. Lonni decides to go, however, and is accompanied by his loyal gun bearer Jacques. When the group reaches a stretch of rapids, they leave the water to travel overland. They stop at a nearby village where a witch doctor is treating the local chief's wife, and when Ellen learns that the witch doctor wants to kill the woman because he believes that she is possessed by evil spirits, Ellen insists on examining her. The chief agrees, and Ellen saves the woman's life by pulling a tooth that has abcessed and infected her lymph nodes. ...

More Less

In 1907, hunter John "Lonni" Douglas, who has spent his life in the Belgian Congo struggling to earn money, is irritated by the arrival of Ellen Burton, a beautiful nurse who has come to the Congo to work with missionary doctor Mary. The cynical Lonni is suspicious of Ellen's motives for coming to Africa, while Ellen is annoyed by Lonni's male chauvinism. Although Lonni warns Ellen that Dr. Mary has traveled up the Congo River to help the victims of a fever epidemic, Ellen is determined to join her. That evening, fed up with capturing animals for zoos, Lonni tells his Dutch business partner, Huysman, that he is quitting. Huysman, who has spent seven years searching for gold, urges Lonni to remain and shows him a necklace made of gold nuggets, which supposedly came from the region where Dr. Mary is currently working. Huysman states that by escorting Ellen to Mary, Lonni will have a "passport" into the area, although Lonni is worried about traveling so close to the homeland of the mysterious and violent Bakuba tribe. Lonni decides to go, however, and is accompanied by his loyal gun bearer Jacques. When the group reaches a stretch of rapids, they leave the water to travel overland. They stop at a nearby village where a witch doctor is treating the local chief's wife, and when Ellen learns that the witch doctor wants to kill the woman because he believes that she is possessed by evil spirits, Ellen insists on examining her. The chief agrees, and Ellen saves the woman's life by pulling a tooth that has abcessed and infected her lymph nodes. During a feast afterward, Ellen is disturbed by the witch doctor's animosity toward her, and later that night, he attempts to kill her by slipping a tarantula into her tent, but her screams bring Lonni rushing in to save her. Lonni caustically advises Ellen to return home, but Ellen stubbornly insists on persevering. Continuing up river, the group reaches the outpost and learns that Dr. Mary has died from fever. Lonni again believes that Ellen will turn back, but after she successfully delivers a baby, she declares that she will remain at the makeshift hospital. While Lonni grudingly is showing Ellen how to hunt, they see a teenaged Bakuba, Mekope, attempting to complete a warrior rite of passage by killing a lion, but the lion mauls him and Lonni shoots it. Ellen tends to the boy's injuries and assures Lonni that as long as his wounds do not become infected, he will recover. Lonni, who discovered another gold nugget necklace while rescuing Mekope, frets over what to do, and tells Ellen that he will escort the boy home, but does not inform her of his real motives. That evening, however, Lonni confesses to Ellen that his life is empty. Ellen, who had earlier told Lonni that she is a widow, reveals that her doctor husband's dream had been to come to Africa, where he felt he was most needed. Unable to resist his growing attraction to Ellen, Lonni kisses her, but she tells him that she cannot reciprocate, and he accuses her of wanting to share her world with a dead man. When Ellen returns to the compound, she discovers that Mekope is running a fever, but her ministrations are interrupted by the appearance of some Bakuba warriors, who snatch the youth and take him home. The next morning, Huysman, who had heard about Mekope's injuries, arrives and is delighted that Lonni will be able to enter Bakuba territory unmolested when he takes the youth home. Lonni explains that Mekope is gone, however, and Huysman shows him an arsenal of guns and dynamite that he intends to use against the warriors. Just then, they hear a drum message from the Bakubas, summoning Ellen to help Mekope. Hoping to avoid bloodshed, Lonni persuades Huysman to wait while he escorts Ellen to the Bakuba village, then scouts for gold. Ellen is touched by Lonni's willingness to accompany her, although when they arrive, the Bakubas treat Lonni with suspicion. They accept his explanation that "the white witch doctor" needed a guide, and Ellen then sees her patient. Ellen is horrified to learn that Mekope has developed gangrene, but with Lonni's help, sets up a drip to keep medicine flowing over the wound. Impressed by Ellen's devotion, the Bakuba king, who is Mekope's father, tells her that she is the first white person to come to his country to help his people, rather than to rob them. After the king leaves, Ellen tearfully explains to Lonni that she does not deserve his kind words. Ellen relates that when her husband told her his dream of coming to Africa, she talked him out of it, as she did not want to give up her comfortable life, and when he died, she realized she had deprived him of his greatest aspiration. Although Ellen had come to the Congo to make amends, she now realizes that she wants to help others rather than herself, and Lonni is impressed by her transformation. As they talk, a Bakuba killed by a bullet is brought in, and Lonni realizes that the impatient Huysman and his cohorts must be nearby. Lonni confesses to Ellen that he has been using her in his attempts to find gold, but then bravely tells the king that he will go to Huysman and order him to leave. The king insists on keeping Ellen as a hostage, and after she kisses Lonni goodbye, he finds Huysman's camp. Although Lonni declares that there is no gold in the area, one of Huysman's men knocks him out and ties him up. Huysman threatens to shoot Lonni if he does not reveal the truth, but Jacques, who has followed Lonni, sets off the dynamite as a distraction. With Jacques's help, Lonni defeats his enemies, although Jacques is killed during the melee. Lonni returns to the village, where an exhausted Ellen accidentally breaks the novocaine drip. Fortunately, her treatment has proven effective, and Mekope regains consciousness. Later, during a celebration, the king dubs Ellen "Big Mama," as Dr. Mary was called, and overwhelmed with happiness, she embraces Lonni.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Human Desire

The working title of this film was The Human Beast . A Sep 1950 HR news item reveals that producers Jerry Wald and Norman Krasna originally ... >>

Westward the Women

The film's pre-release title was Pioneer Women . The opening credits list Robert Taylor and Denise Darcel first, with several other cast members listed after them. ... >>

Top Hat

Because the film script used very little from the Aladar Laszlo-Alexander Faragó play, RKO chose not to give screen credit to the playwrights. However, in reviews and other ... >>

Watermelon Man

The film was originally titled The Night the Sun Came Out on Happy Hollow Lane, which was later shortened to The Night the Sun Came Out. ... >>

The Covered Wagon

Two title cards introduce the story: “The blood of America is the blood of pioneers—the blood of lion-hearted men and women who carved a splendid civilization out of an ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.