The Last Time I Saw Paris (1954)

116 mins | Romance | 19 November 1954

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Babylon Revisited . F. Scott Fitzgerald's short story, written in 1931, was set among American expatriates living in Paris after the excesses of the 1920s, the "Roaring Twenties," and the devastation of the Depression. The character of "Helen" is referred to, but does not appear in the short story. Although the film was copyrighted in 1954, the entry in the copyright book states "in notice: 1944," possibly due to a typographical error in the cutting continuity submitted.
       The rights to Fitzgerald's story originally belonged to independent producer Lester Cowan, who had plans to produce it with his partner, Mary Pickford, according to a Dec 1946 HR news item. Cowan sold the rights to Paramount in 1951, and a 17 Dec 1951 DV news item reported that Bernard Smith would produce the film and that screenwriters Julius and Philip Epstein would co-direct. The Last Time I Saw Paris marked Philip Epstein's last release; he died in Feb 1952. In Nov 1952, Var reported that William Wyler would direct the film for Paramount, with Gregory Peck as "Charles Wills." M-G-M acquired the film rights from Paramount in 1953.
       Feb and May 1954 HR news items include Carlos Thompson and Murray Pollack in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Portions of the film were shot on location in Paris and Nice. HR production charts indicate that background filming took place in Paris in late Mar 1954, although principal photography did not begin until mid-Apr. Jack Martin Smith is listed as art director in ... More Less

The working title of this film was Babylon Revisited . F. Scott Fitzgerald's short story, written in 1931, was set among American expatriates living in Paris after the excesses of the 1920s, the "Roaring Twenties," and the devastation of the Depression. The character of "Helen" is referred to, but does not appear in the short story. Although the film was copyrighted in 1954, the entry in the copyright book states "in notice: 1944," possibly due to a typographical error in the cutting continuity submitted.
       The rights to Fitzgerald's story originally belonged to independent producer Lester Cowan, who had plans to produce it with his partner, Mary Pickford, according to a Dec 1946 HR news item. Cowan sold the rights to Paramount in 1951, and a 17 Dec 1951 DV news item reported that Bernard Smith would produce the film and that screenwriters Julius and Philip Epstein would co-direct. The Last Time I Saw Paris marked Philip Epstein's last release; he died in Feb 1952. In Nov 1952, Var reported that William Wyler would direct the film for Paramount, with Gregory Peck as "Charles Wills." M-G-M acquired the film rights from Paramount in 1953.
       Feb and May 1954 HR news items include Carlos Thompson and Murray Pollack in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Portions of the film were shot on location in Paris and Nice. HR production charts indicate that background filming took place in Paris in late Mar 1954, although principal photography did not begin until mid-Apr. Jack Martin Smith is listed as art director in the first production chart only. The Last Time I Saw Paris marked the American film debut of British actor Roger Moore (1927--). Moore was under contract to M-G-M, then Warner Bros., in the late 1950s to early 1960s. He then returned to England, where he starred in the popular television series The Saint , which ran from 1963 through 1966 on CBS and from 1967 through 1969 on NBC. Moore went on to star in seven of the James Bond films in the 1970s and 1980s. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Nov 1954.
---
Daily Variety
17 Dec 1951.
---
Daily Variety
3 Nov 54
p. 3.
Film Daily
4 Nov 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1946.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Dec 53
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 54
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 54
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Mar 54
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 54
pp. 10-11.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 54
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 54
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 54
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 54
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 54
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Nov 54
p. 201.
New York Times
19 Nov 54
p. 20.
Variety
5 Nov 1952.
---
Variety
3 Nov 54
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Alberto Morin
Art La Forest
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Hair styles
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Babylon Revisited" by F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Saturday Evening Post (21 Feb 1931).
SONGS
"The Last Time I Saw Paris," music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Babylon Revisited
Release Date:
19 November 1954
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 November 1954
Production Date:
19 April--25 May 1954
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 November 1954
Copyright Number:
LP4683
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
116
Length(in feet):
10,413
Length(in reels):
13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17124
SYNOPSIS

American Charles Wills returns to Paris, after a two-year absence, to see his daughter. He stops for a drink at a café owned by his old friend Maurice and reminisces about the days near the end of World War II: On VE Day, Charles, a reporter for The Stars and Stripes , is among the Americans celebrating in the streets with the joyous French citizens. He ducks into Maurice's café, where he encounters his friend, Claude Matine, and is introduced to American Marion Ellswirth, who has been in France throughout the war. Marion takes the men to a party thrown by her father James, a charming rascal with a talent for living beyond his means. Charles' eye is caught by Marion's beautiful, vivacious sister Helen, and the young woman stuns him with her description of the family's decadent lifestyle. Marion grows jealous as Helen flirts with Charles, and makes an appointment to meet him later. However, Helen learns about their assignation and shows up in Marion's place, and amid the victory festivities, they kiss. When Helen later comes down with a bad flu after being out in a storm, Charles visits her in the hospital, and they decide to marry. Helen wishes to stay in France, so Charles takes a job with a Paris news agency. Marion, who is still in love with Charles, soon announces her engagement to Claude. Charles and Helen marry, move in with James and have a daughter, Vicki. Charles devotes all his spare time to his writing, but after completing two novels is still unable to find a publisher. By 1950, Charles has grown despondent over his lack of success as an author, ... +


American Charles Wills returns to Paris, after a two-year absence, to see his daughter. He stops for a drink at a café owned by his old friend Maurice and reminisces about the days near the end of World War II: On VE Day, Charles, a reporter for The Stars and Stripes , is among the Americans celebrating in the streets with the joyous French citizens. He ducks into Maurice's café, where he encounters his friend, Claude Matine, and is introduced to American Marion Ellswirth, who has been in France throughout the war. Marion takes the men to a party thrown by her father James, a charming rascal with a talent for living beyond his means. Charles' eye is caught by Marion's beautiful, vivacious sister Helen, and the young woman stuns him with her description of the family's decadent lifestyle. Marion grows jealous as Helen flirts with Charles, and makes an appointment to meet him later. However, Helen learns about their assignation and shows up in Marion's place, and amid the victory festivities, they kiss. When Helen later comes down with a bad flu after being out in a storm, Charles visits her in the hospital, and they decide to marry. Helen wishes to stay in France, so Charles takes a job with a Paris news agency. Marion, who is still in love with Charles, soon announces her engagement to Claude. Charles and Helen marry, move in with James and have a daughter, Vicki. Charles devotes all his spare time to his writing, but after completing two novels is still unable to find a publisher. By 1950, Charles has grown despondent over his lack of success as an author, and tired of Helen's frivolous, often outlandish behavior. One night, Charles is assigned to interview socialite Lorraine Quarl, who is in Paris finalizing her most recent divorce. They spend the evening together, and when Charles returns home in the morning, Helen's lack of suspicion nettles him. Marion calls with the news that one of James's supposedly worthless oil leases, which he gave Charles and Helen as a wedding gift, has paid off. The family celebrates its newfound wealth with extravagant purchases and parties, and Charles quits his job to concentrate on his writing. Charles' third novel is also rejected, however, and he falls into a deep depression and bitterly declares himself a failure. One night, James invites Paul Lane, a suave "international tennis bum," to attend a party with them. At the party, Paul flirts with Helen, and the inebriated Charles encounters Lorraine, who is now divorcing her fifth husband. Helen asks her husband to take her home, but he insists on taking Lorraine for a drive instead. The following day, Helen treats the badly hung-over Charles coldly, despite his assurances that nothing happened between him and Lorraine. Helen admits that she joined Paul for a nightcap at his hotel and was strongly tempted to have an affair with him. She then tells Charles she is unhappy and asks to go back to America. Charles, who has been seduced by the decadence that Helen now finds unfulfilling, refuses. Instead, he takes Lorraine to Monte Carlo to compete in an automobile race. When they return to Paris, they find Helen at Maurice's café with Paul, and Charles takes a swing at him. Paul takes Helen to his hotel and declares his love for her, but makes it clear that he wishes her to stay with her husband and keep him on the side, pointing out that half the people in her social circle have such "arrangements." Disgusted, Helen walks out and returns home, but is unable to get into the house because Charles has chained the door and passed out, drunk. Helen walks through the snow to Marion and Claude's house, then collapses. Helen is hospitalized, and when the apologetic Charles visits, she asks him to take care of Vicki, and dies. Marion sues for custody of Vicki, and the grief- and guilt-stricken Charles yields without a fight, wishing only to return to America. Back in the present, Charles tells Maurice that the oil wells dried up a year before. Charles then goes to visit James, and is surprised to find him in a wheelchair, the victim of a stroke. James commends Charles on the book he has published, calling it very honest. After being reunited with his daughter, Charles tells Claude and Marion that he wants to take Vicki back with him, but Marion bitterly rejects his emotional appeal. After Charles leaves, shattered, Claude accuses Marion of still being angry that Charles chose Helen over her. Later that evening, Charles is at Maurice's café when Marion comes in and says Helen would not have wanted him to be alone. She takes him outside, where Claude and Vicki are waiting. As Claude and Marion exchange a warm glance, Charles and his daughter walk hand in hand down the boulevard. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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