Bernardine (1957)

94-95 mins | Drama | July 1957

Director:

Henry Levin

Writer:

Theodore Reeves

Producer:

Samuel G. Engel

Cinematographer:

Paul C. Vogel

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Albert Hogsett

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

HR news items yield the following information about this production: In Dec 1955, Buddy Adler was announced as producer and Robert Wagner was considered for a leading role. A Mar 1956 item notes that Hope Lange was to appear in the picture. In Jan 1957, Ed Byrnes tested for one of the leads, but was not cast. Although a Sep 1956 item states that Bernardine was to mark Judy Busch's screen debut, her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. According to a 26 Mar 1957 HR item, the song "Love Letters in the Sand" was added to the film at the end of production. Bernardine marked the screen debuts of Pat Boone and Ronnie Burns, the son of George Burns and Gracie Allen. It also marked Janet Gaynor's return to the screen after an almost ten-year absence. ... More Less

HR news items yield the following information about this production: In Dec 1955, Buddy Adler was announced as producer and Robert Wagner was considered for a leading role. A Mar 1956 item notes that Hope Lange was to appear in the picture. In Jan 1957, Ed Byrnes tested for one of the leads, but was not cast. Although a Sep 1956 item states that Bernardine was to mark Judy Busch's screen debut, her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. According to a 26 Mar 1957 HR item, the song "Love Letters in the Sand" was added to the film at the end of production. Bernardine marked the screen debuts of Pat Boone and Ronnie Burns, the son of George Burns and Gracie Allen. It also marked Janet Gaynor's return to the screen after an almost ten-year absence. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Jun 1957.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jun 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
25 Jun 57
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 55
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 56
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Dec 56
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jan 57
p. 25.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 57
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 57
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 57
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 57
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 57
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 57
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Jun 57
p. 433.
New York Times
25 Jul 57
p. 28.
Variety
3 Jul 57
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Exec ward des
Cost des
Ward
MUSIC
Vocal supv
Orch
Orch
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Song numbers staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Bernardine by Mary Chase, as produced by Irving L. Jacobs and Guthrie McClintic (New York, 16 Oct 1952).
SONGS
"Bernardine" and "Technique," words and music by Johnny Mercer
"Love Letters in the Sand," words and music by Charles Kenny, Nick Kenny and J. Fred Coots.
DETAILS
Release Date:
July 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 24 July 1957
Production Date:
early February--27 March 1957
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
21 June 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8804
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
94-95
Length(in feet):
8,557
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18546
SYNOPSIS

At Wingate High School, studious, socially inept Vernon Kinswood is teased by fellow seniors Arthur "Beau" Beaumont and Sanford "Fofo Bidnut" Wilson. After school, the boys race their jalopies to their hangout called the "Shamrock Club," an organization devoted to their interests in speed boats and their quest for a mythical dream girl named Bernardine from Sneaky Falls, Illinois. When Sanford, a clumsy, would-be Casanova, declares that he intends to take a date to see bongo king Jack Costanzo perform at the Black Cat Club, the boys decide to call the information operator once again and ask for the fictional Bernardine's phone number. After young, gullible operator 22 answers their inquiry, Sanford decides to go to the telephone office to ask her for a date. There, he meets operator 22, Jean Cantrick, who simply smiles when the seasoned operators expose the boys's ruse by explaining that Bernardine does not exist. Determined, Sanford invites Jean to join him that night, and then follows her until she accepts his invitation. Triumphant, Sanford phones Beau to tell them he has found Bernardine, and suggests checking her out at the Black Cat Club. After Beau confirms that Jean is indeed, Bernardine, Sanford invites her to watch him race his boat. Sanford's newfound bliss is shattered when his mother receives a letter from school notifying her that her son may fail to graduate unless he passes all his final exams. When Mrs. Wilson considers marrying her pompous suitor, J. Fullerton Weldy, to provide discipline for her son, Sanford pleads with his mother to reconsider and promises to devote himself to his studies for the next two weeks. ... +


At Wingate High School, studious, socially inept Vernon Kinswood is teased by fellow seniors Arthur "Beau" Beaumont and Sanford "Fofo Bidnut" Wilson. After school, the boys race their jalopies to their hangout called the "Shamrock Club," an organization devoted to their interests in speed boats and their quest for a mythical dream girl named Bernardine from Sneaky Falls, Illinois. When Sanford, a clumsy, would-be Casanova, declares that he intends to take a date to see bongo king Jack Costanzo perform at the Black Cat Club, the boys decide to call the information operator once again and ask for the fictional Bernardine's phone number. After young, gullible operator 22 answers their inquiry, Sanford decides to go to the telephone office to ask her for a date. There, he meets operator 22, Jean Cantrick, who simply smiles when the seasoned operators expose the boys's ruse by explaining that Bernardine does not exist. Determined, Sanford invites Jean to join him that night, and then follows her until she accepts his invitation. Triumphant, Sanford phones Beau to tell them he has found Bernardine, and suggests checking her out at the Black Cat Club. After Beau confirms that Jean is indeed, Bernardine, Sanford invites her to watch him race his boat. Sanford's newfound bliss is shattered when his mother receives a letter from school notifying her that her son may fail to graduate unless he passes all his final exams. When Mrs. Wilson considers marrying her pompous suitor, J. Fullerton Weldy, to provide discipline for her son, Sanford pleads with his mother to reconsider and promises to devote himself to his studies for the next two weeks. After Sanford tells Beau that he needs a final "first-class fling" with Jean before sequestering himself with his books, the suave, smooth-talking Beau offers to let him drive his older brother Lee's red Thunderbird. Lee, an Air Force lieutenant stationed in Alaska, arrives home on leave just as Sanford is about to drive off in the Thunderbird and immediately reclaims his car. Relinquishing his dreams of a taking Jean to a fancy nightclub in a sporty car, Sanford settles for going on a picnic in his old jalopy. When Sanford clumsily spills coke on Jean's dress and then tries to maul her, she runs off down the road. Soon after, Lee drives by and offers her a ride. Later that night, Sanford calls to apologize and when Jean readily forgives him, he assumes that the attraction is mutual. To occupy Jean while he is studying for exams, Sanford, unaware that Lee is smitten with Jean, asks Beau to convince his older brother to date her for the next two weeks. Mrs. Wilson arranges for Vernon to tutor Sanford, but one night, fed up with studying, Sanford drops Vernon off at the library while he goes to the clubhouse. When Griner, one of the members, reports that he saw Lee romancing Jean in his Thunderbird, Sanford decides to sell his boat and buy a new car, and Beau tricks the thrifty Vernon into buying it. As exams commence, Beau and the boys escort the frazzled Sanford to school. Sanford passes his tests, but pride in his accomplishment turns to feelings of betrayal when his mother refuses to end her relationship with Weldy. Beau is delighted when Lee is recalled to duty, but his joy turns to dismay when Lee announces his plans to marry Jean before leaving. After Beau breaks the news to Sanford, Sanford drives off in a fury, runs his car off the road and then decides to enlist in the military. When Sanford informs his mother of his decision, she laments that she has failed to understand her son, who has suddenly become an adult. At Christmastime, Sanford comes home for a visit and sullenly refuses to see his old friends. When he enters his room, he finds Beau waiting to surprise him, and after the other boys join in a rendition of the song "Bernardine," Sanford smiles and hugs Beau. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.