Kiss Them for Me (1957)

102-103 mins | Drama | December 1957

Director:

Stanley Donen

Producer:

Jerry Wald

Cinematographer:

Milton Krasner

Editor:

Robert Simpson

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Maurice Ransford

Production Company:

Jerry Wald Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

HR news items yield the following information about this film: In Oct 1955, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. bought the rights to Frederic Wakeman's novel and Luther Davis' play. By Sep 1956, Jerry Wald had acquired the rights to both the novel and play. In Apr 1957, a news item announced that Dan Dailey was to star with Cary Grant and Jayne Mansfield. LAT news items add that in Oct 1956, Wald was considering George Montgomery for one of the leads. By Dec 1956, it was announced that Wald wanted Richard Widmark, who also starred in the Broadway version of Davis' play, to appear.
       Although a May 1957 HR news item states that King Donovan was added to the cast, but he was not in the released film. A May 1957 HR news item notes that location filming took place in San Francisco. Although onscreen credits read "introducing Suzy Parker," Kiss Them for Me did not mark noted fashion model Parker's screen debut, but rather her first major role. Parker's first film was the 1957 release Funny Face (see ... More Less

HR news items yield the following information about this film: In Oct 1955, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. bought the rights to Frederic Wakeman's novel and Luther Davis' play. By Sep 1956, Jerry Wald had acquired the rights to both the novel and play. In Apr 1957, a news item announced that Dan Dailey was to star with Cary Grant and Jayne Mansfield. LAT news items add that in Oct 1956, Wald was considering George Montgomery for one of the leads. By Dec 1956, it was announced that Wald wanted Richard Widmark, who also starred in the Broadway version of Davis' play, to appear.
       Although a May 1957 HR news item states that King Donovan was added to the cast, but he was not in the released film. A May 1957 HR news item notes that location filming took place in San Francisco. Although onscreen credits read "introducing Suzy Parker," Kiss Them for Me did not mark noted fashion model Parker's screen debut, but rather her first major role. Parker's first film was the 1957 release Funny Face (see above). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
9 Nov 1957.
---
Daily Variety
6 Nov 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Nov 57
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1955.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 1956.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 57
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 57
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Apr 57
p. 3, 23.
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 57
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 57
pp. 4-5.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 57
p. 20
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 57
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 57
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 57
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
24 Oct 1956.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Dec 1956.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Nov 57
p. 593.
New York Times
9 Nov 57
p. 31.
Variety
6 Nov 57
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
Prod
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Exec ward des
MUSIC
Orch
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
Hair dresser
Hair dresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Dial coach
Scr supv
Casting
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Kiss Them for Me by Luther Davis (New York, 20 Mar 1945) which was based on the novel Shore Leave by Frederic Wakeman (New York, 1944).
SONGS
"Kiss Them for Me," words and music by Carroll Coates and Lionel Newman, sung by The McGuire Sisters.
DETAILS
Release Date:
December 1957
Premiere Information:
San Francisco premiere: 6 November 1957
New York opening: 8 November 1957
Production Date:
late April--25 June 1957
addl scenes began 2 July 1957
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. and Jerry Wald Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 November 1957
Copyright Number:
LP10271
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
102-103
Length(in feet):
9,207
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18625
SYNOPSIS

In the Pacific arena in 1944, fighter pilot Andy Crewson circumvents regulations to finagle a four-day leave to San Francisco for himself and fellow Navy flying aces Mississip Hardy and Howard "Mac" McCann. Together with Naval public relations officer Commander Walter Wallace, who has been assigned to shepherd the three war heroes through the press, they hop onto a San Francisco-bound plane piloted by their friend, Chuck Roundtree. On the flight, Mac, who is running for Congress, confides that he joined the Navy as a ticket to a political career, while Wallace discloses that he plans to use his position to win a public relations job with shipping tycoon Eddie Turnbill. At the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco, Wallace wrangles a suite for the flyers while Crewson prowls the lobby for attractive women. Once in their suite, the three discard their uniforms for black kimonos, and soon after, the flashy, flirtatious Alice Cratchner appears in response to a card that Crewson has distributed promising nylons. After Crewson invites a group of partygoers to the suite, Mac calls to confer with his wife about his campaign. Hoping to win an extended leave for the threesome, Wallace brings Turnbill to meet the pilots. When Turnbill's stylish fiancée, Gwenneth Livingston, arrives, Crewson becomes intrigued. Soon after, Ensign Lewis appears to collect a copy of the pilots' orders, and Crewson, who has no orders, entices him with Alice and alcohol. Turnbill, a self-important war profiteer, proposes that the pilots deliver a series of anecdotal speeches to his shipyard workers, but Crewson, angered at being asked to trivialize his war experiences, insults Turnbill and abruptly adjourns the ... +


In the Pacific arena in 1944, fighter pilot Andy Crewson circumvents regulations to finagle a four-day leave to San Francisco for himself and fellow Navy flying aces Mississip Hardy and Howard "Mac" McCann. Together with Naval public relations officer Commander Walter Wallace, who has been assigned to shepherd the three war heroes through the press, they hop onto a San Francisco-bound plane piloted by their friend, Chuck Roundtree. On the flight, Mac, who is running for Congress, confides that he joined the Navy as a ticket to a political career, while Wallace discloses that he plans to use his position to win a public relations job with shipping tycoon Eddie Turnbill. At the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco, Wallace wrangles a suite for the flyers while Crewson prowls the lobby for attractive women. Once in their suite, the three discard their uniforms for black kimonos, and soon after, the flashy, flirtatious Alice Cratchner appears in response to a card that Crewson has distributed promising nylons. After Crewson invites a group of partygoers to the suite, Mac calls to confer with his wife about his campaign. Hoping to win an extended leave for the threesome, Wallace brings Turnbill to meet the pilots. When Turnbill's stylish fiancée, Gwenneth Livingston, arrives, Crewson becomes intrigued. Soon after, Ensign Lewis appears to collect a copy of the pilots' orders, and Crewson, who has no orders, entices him with Alice and alcohol. Turnbill, a self-important war profiteer, proposes that the pilots deliver a series of anecdotal speeches to his shipyard workers, but Crewson, angered at being asked to trivialize his war experiences, insults Turnbill and abruptly adjourns the party. When, in revenge, Turnbill arranges for the three to be ordered to the hospital for an exam, Gwenneth intervenes on their behalf and promises her fiancé that the pilots have agreed to speak at his shipyard. Unable to hail a taxi to take them to the shipyard, Crewson hops on a streetcar with Gwenneth, who finds herself attracted to the darkly handsome pilot. Instead of proceeding to the shipyard, they stop at a nightclub, and there Gwenneth confesses that she agreed to marry Turnbill because she knows that he will never be killed in combat. After exchanging a meaningful kiss, they return to the hotel bar, where Crewson meets an old pilot friend who is now confined to a wheelchair, awaiting certain death from his war injuries. When the dying pilot voices his last wish of flying into combat, Crewson is shaken. Consequently, when Turnbill finds Crewson at the bar and reproaches him for failing to keep his speaking engagement, Crewson slugs Turnbill, and Gwenneth throws her engagement ring in Turnbill's face. After a passionate embrace, Crewson and Gwenneth spend the night together at her apartment. The next morning at the hotel, Alice is disappointed because Mac spent the night telling her how much he loves his wife. When Crewson appears, Wallace blames him for ruining his chance for a job with Turnbill. The shore police, sent by Turnbill, then arrive to take the pilots to the Alameda hospital. There, Mac learns that he has won the election and is thus eligible for a discharge. Soon after, Alice phones Gwenneth with the news that Wallace has found another tycoon to keep the pilots out of combat and that a party has been planned that night at the hotel to celebrate. Later, at their hotel suite, Gwenneth starts to plan her future with Crewson, but when he balks at the idea of marriage, she angrily storms out of the room. Wallace then introduces Crewson to their new benefactor, paper tycoon Bill Hotchkiss. As Hotchkiss drones on about the importance of paper to the war effort, Chuck stumbles into the room, drunk, and declares that he is flying back to the Pacific. The celebratory air quickly evaporates when Chuck announces that their carrier has been sunk and the captain and most of the crew have gone down with their ship. The news triggers an attack of Crewson's malaria, and when Gwenneth embraces him to quell his shivering, he admits that he loves her. The grim news forces Mississip and Crewson to realize that their place is in combat, and they hurry to the airport to catch Chuck's plane. There, Crewson informs Mac that they are returning to war, and after Crewson kisses the tearful Gwenneth goodbye and promises to return one day, he and Mississip jump onto Chuck's plane, followed by Mac. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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