Oh, Men! Oh, Women! (1957)

89-90 mins | Comedy | February 1957

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HISTORY

Neither screenwriter Nunnally Johnson nor playwright Edward Chodorov are credited onscreen. According to a LAEx news item, producer Charles Feldman bought the rights to Chodorov's play in 1954, then sold them to Twentieth Century-Fox. A Feb 1957 DV news item adds that Chodorov agreed to allow his name to be eliminated from the film's credits when he sold his rights to Feldman. A Sep 1955 DV news item states that Feldman considered making the picture with Marilyn Monroe. Although HR news items note that Judy Busch and Michael Falcon were to make their screen debuts in the picture, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. HR news items note that location filming was took place in New York City and aboard the French liner Liberté . Oh, Men! Oh, Women! marked the screen debut of Tony Randall (1920--2004), who is listed in CBCS as Anthony ... More Less

Neither screenwriter Nunnally Johnson nor playwright Edward Chodorov are credited onscreen. According to a LAEx news item, producer Charles Feldman bought the rights to Chodorov's play in 1954, then sold them to Twentieth Century-Fox. A Feb 1957 DV news item adds that Chodorov agreed to allow his name to be eliminated from the film's credits when he sold his rights to Feldman. A Sep 1955 DV news item states that Feldman considered making the picture with Marilyn Monroe. Although HR news items note that Judy Busch and Michael Falcon were to make their screen debuts in the picture, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. HR news items note that location filming was took place in New York City and aboard the French liner Liberté . Oh, Men! Oh, Women! marked the screen debut of Tony Randall (1920--2004), who is listed in CBCS as Anthony Randall. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Feb 1957.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 1955.
---
Daily Variety
19 Feb 57
p. 3.
Daily Variety
27 Feb 1957.
---
Film Daily
25 Feb 57
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 56
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 56
p. 9, 11.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 56
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 56
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 56
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 56
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 56
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 57
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
11 Sep 1954.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Feb 57
p. 273.
New York Times
22 Feb 57
p. 25.
Variety
20 Feb 57
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Exec ward des
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Dial coach
Scr supv
Casting dir
Asst casting dir
Stager of fights
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Oh, Men! Oh, Women! by Edward Chodorov, as produced by Cheryl Crawford (New York, 17 Dec 1953).
DETAILS
Release Date:
February 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 February 1957
Production Date:
late October--30 November 1956
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 February 1957
Copyright Number:
LP7783
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
89-90
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Two days before his marriage to Myra Hagerman, New York psychiatrist Alan Coles is awakened in the middle of the night by Mildred Turner, a patient who complains that her movie star husband Arthur treats her like the character of Nora in the Ibsen play A Doll's House . Alan's annoyances go from bad to worse when the next morning, Grant Cobbler, a neurotic new patient, tentatively enters the office, tremulous with tics, and whimpers that he is unable to eat or sleep because he is "plagued by a dame." As Cobbler rants about the woman he broke up with eight months earlier yet is unable to forget, he mentions that her name is Myra, causing Alan to end the session abruptly. Bewildered at the idea that one of his patients once romanced his fiancée, Alan is about to leave the office when Mildred bursts in and babbles on about her dissatisfaction with her marriage. She then drops a bombshell by telling Alan that Arthur had dated Myra four years earlier. After she leaves the office, Alan lies down on his own couch, totally perplexed. Proceeding to Myra's apartment, Alan questions her about her relationship with Cobbler, but she adamantly refuses to discuss "that horrible little man." Just then, the doorbell rings and Arthur falls, drunk, onto the floor. Arthur blames Alan for the problems in his marriage, and to get even, he passionately embraces Myra, after which Alan offers to leave them alone for thirty minutes. After Alan departs, Arthur grabs Myra and demands a kiss. Their embrace is interrupted by Cobbler, who rings the doorbell and ... +


Two days before his marriage to Myra Hagerman, New York psychiatrist Alan Coles is awakened in the middle of the night by Mildred Turner, a patient who complains that her movie star husband Arthur treats her like the character of Nora in the Ibsen play A Doll's House . Alan's annoyances go from bad to worse when the next morning, Grant Cobbler, a neurotic new patient, tentatively enters the office, tremulous with tics, and whimpers that he is unable to eat or sleep because he is "plagued by a dame." As Cobbler rants about the woman he broke up with eight months earlier yet is unable to forget, he mentions that her name is Myra, causing Alan to end the session abruptly. Bewildered at the idea that one of his patients once romanced his fiancée, Alan is about to leave the office when Mildred bursts in and babbles on about her dissatisfaction with her marriage. She then drops a bombshell by telling Alan that Arthur had dated Myra four years earlier. After she leaves the office, Alan lies down on his own couch, totally perplexed. Proceeding to Myra's apartment, Alan questions her about her relationship with Cobbler, but she adamantly refuses to discuss "that horrible little man." Just then, the doorbell rings and Arthur falls, drunk, onto the floor. Arthur blames Alan for the problems in his marriage, and to get even, he passionately embraces Myra, after which Alan offers to leave them alone for thirty minutes. After Alan departs, Arthur grabs Myra and demands a kiss. Their embrace is interrupted by Cobbler, who rings the doorbell and begs Myra to let him in. When Myra orders Cobbler to go away, he breaks in through the fire escape and theatrically proclaims that Myra has caused him great agony and happiness, to which Myra responds she intends to be married to Alan forever. When Arthur opens the door to throw Cobbler out, Alan is standing on the threshold, startling Cobbler speechless. Cobbler then hysterically reproaches Alan, stating that he is unprofessional and should be disbarred or unfrocked. After Arthur histrionically improvises a scene from A Doll's House , Alan observes that there can be no resolution between men and women because each sex wants something different, and Arthur leaves. Cobbler continues his verbal attack on Alan, who slugs him in the stomach and ushers him out of the room. When Myra criticizes Alan's aggressive behavior, he calls her childish and begins screaming. Shocked by his own outburst, Alan proceeds to a bar, where he finds Cobbler and Arthur. Later that night, a contrite Alan returns to Myra's apartment, but she refuses to see him. The next morning, Mildred flies into Alan's office, jabbering wildly about her marriage. Next, Arthur, hung over, appears and is followed by Cobbler. Aware that the ship on which he is to be wed is sailing that afternoon and anxious about his fiancée's state of mind, Alan asks his secretary to contact Dr. Kraus, his mentor. After Arthur throws Cobble out of the office, Mildred declares that she just wants to feel needed and Alan advises that Arthur play the role of sweetheart rather than that of husband. As Arthur and Mildred decide to reconcile over drinks, Alan proceeds to the ship and waits alone, in the honeymoon suite, hoping that Myra will appear. Soon after, Dr. Kraus arrives and reassures the inhibited Alan that his outburst was quite normal. After Kraus counsels that with patience, Myra will develop into a devoted wife, Myra appears and Kraus excuses himself. Soon after, Cobbler slithers into the room and Alan chases him out and throws him down the gangplank. Upset, Myra grumbles that Alan is rowdy, just like the rest of her suitors, and then criticizes him for not being more persistent the previous evening. After she challenges Alan to do something that will make her change her mind about breaking their engagement and leaving the boat, he calls her exasperating and infuriating. In the midst of their argument, the ship pulls away from the dock and Myra, thinking that Alan deliberately tricked her into staying onboard, forgives him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.