Portland Exposé (1957)

70 or 72-73 mins | Melodrama | 11 August 1957

Director:

Harold Schuster

Writer:

Jack DeWitt

Producer:

Lindsley Parsons

Cinematographer:

Carl Berger

Editor:

Maurice Wright

Production Designer:

David Milton
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HISTORY

Voice-over narration introduces Portland as the "city of rose," untouched by organized crime until a syndicate tries to infiltrate the lives of citizens. Narration also closes the film, explaining that after Senate Permanent Subcommittee Investigation hearings headed by Sen. John McClellan exposed the syndicate, peace was restored in Portland. As noted in the Var review, the hearings had been held earlier in 1957, involving prominent members of the Pacific Northwest.
       HR news items state that Barry Sullivan was considered for a role and add Dale Van Sickle , Evelynn Eaton, Fay Roope, Hugh Lawrence, Charles Maxwell, Ralph Newton, Carol Lund, Maxine Gates, Kort Falkenberg and Robert Crosson to the cast; however, their appearance in the film has not been confirmed. Memoes found on the PCA file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library stated that direct references to prostitution and abortion should be removed from the film. In the released film, women portrayed as prostitutes instead are referred to as "B-girls."
       Portland Expose was shot on location in Portland, Oregon. According to a 13 Aug 1957 HR news item, after nearly twenty Washington and Oregon exhibitors refused to show the film, citing pressure from interest groups, producer Lindsley Parsons contacted Sen. McClellan. The outcome of any further investigation is ... More Less

Voice-over narration introduces Portland as the "city of rose," untouched by organized crime until a syndicate tries to infiltrate the lives of citizens. Narration also closes the film, explaining that after Senate Permanent Subcommittee Investigation hearings headed by Sen. John McClellan exposed the syndicate, peace was restored in Portland. As noted in the Var review, the hearings had been held earlier in 1957, involving prominent members of the Pacific Northwest.
       HR news items state that Barry Sullivan was considered for a role and add Dale Van Sickle , Evelynn Eaton, Fay Roope, Hugh Lawrence, Charles Maxwell, Ralph Newton, Carol Lund, Maxine Gates, Kort Falkenberg and Robert Crosson to the cast; however, their appearance in the film has not been confirmed. Memoes found on the PCA file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library stated that direct references to prostitution and abortion should be removed from the film. In the released film, women portrayed as prostitutes instead are referred to as "B-girls."
       Portland Expose was shot on location in Portland, Oregon. According to a 13 Aug 1957 HR news item, after nearly twenty Washington and Oregon exhibitors refused to show the film, citing pressure from interest groups, producer Lindsley Parsons contacted Sen. McClellan. The outcome of any further investigation is unknown.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Aug 1957.
---
Daily Variety
14 Aug 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Aug 57
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1957
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 1957
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 1957
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 1957
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 1957
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 1957.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 57
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Aug 57
p. 490.
Variety
14 Aug 57
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Lindsley Parsons Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Chief set elec
Cam op
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Props
Const
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Set cont
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 August 1957
Production Date:
began early June 1957
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Pictures, Corp.
Copyright Date:
19 August 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8835
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
70 or 72-73
Length(in feet):
6,508
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18638
SYNOPSIS

Woodland Tavern owner George Madison resides in a house nearby his modest business with his wife Clara and their two children, seventeen-year-old Ruth and young Jimmy in Portland, Oregon. Under pressure from salesmen Spud Lennox, George installs pinball machines at the tavern. Although the city is known for its safety, a violent crime syndicate with ties to big-city bosses has moved into town to start a gang war with rival pinball and gambling operators. Having beaten up the former crime boss' lackey, syndicate thugs Larry and Joe report to their boss, Phillip Jacman, the names of businesses containing the pinball machines. After Jacman orders them to pressure George to put more pin ball machines in his tavern, the syndicate pickets his establishment until Larry and Joe threaten to throw acid in Ruth’s eyes. He then agrees to run the business under Jacman’s direction and split the profits fifty-fifty. A short while later, the tavern is crowded with business each night thanks to the machines, but Clara does not approve of the gambling and begs George not to let the hoodlums ruin their business or their lives. To rid his business of gang involvement, George arranges a police raid at the tavern. However, the police arrive early and find nothing wrong in their routine check. Desperate, George goes to Portland’s former crime boss, who explains that the new syndicate, once established, will expand their business to drug trafficking and prostitution. Meanwhile, outside the Madison house, when Ruth refuses to go to a club or into the woods alone with boyfriend Benny, the frustrated young man forces her to kiss him. Ruth runs from the car, bumping into Joe, who tries ... +


Woodland Tavern owner George Madison resides in a house nearby his modest business with his wife Clara and their two children, seventeen-year-old Ruth and young Jimmy in Portland, Oregon. Under pressure from salesmen Spud Lennox, George installs pinball machines at the tavern. Although the city is known for its safety, a violent crime syndicate with ties to big-city bosses has moved into town to start a gang war with rival pinball and gambling operators. Having beaten up the former crime boss' lackey, syndicate thugs Larry and Joe report to their boss, Phillip Jacman, the names of businesses containing the pinball machines. After Jacman orders them to pressure George to put more pin ball machines in his tavern, the syndicate pickets his establishment until Larry and Joe threaten to throw acid in Ruth’s eyes. He then agrees to run the business under Jacman’s direction and split the profits fifty-fifty. A short while later, the tavern is crowded with business each night thanks to the machines, but Clara does not approve of the gambling and begs George not to let the hoodlums ruin their business or their lives. To rid his business of gang involvement, George arranges a police raid at the tavern. However, the police arrive early and find nothing wrong in their routine check. Desperate, George goes to Portland’s former crime boss, who explains that the new syndicate, once established, will expand their business to drug trafficking and prostitution. Meanwhile, outside the Madison house, when Ruth refuses to go to a club or into the woods alone with boyfriend Benny, the frustrated young man forces her to kiss him. Ruth runs from the car, bumping into Joe, who tries to rape her. Alerted by Ruth's screams, George punches Joe and in the ensuing struggle takes his gun and prepares to shoot the rapist, but Larry stops him. Ruth has run to the house, where Clara comforts her and then demands to George that the family move away. George orders her to take the children to her mother's and decides to remain behind and uncover the criminal ring. Meanwhile, Jacman, fearing that Joe will talk, orders Larry to kill Joe. Within a few days, as Clara and the children prepare to leave, Benny visits. Ruth thanks him for his apologetic letter and promises to return to town for the fraternity dance in a few weeks. Learning that union labor leader Alfred Grey is organizing an investigation into the ring, George meets with him and reporters Speed Bromley and Ted Carl, who place a wire on George to record evidence to use against the gang in a grand jury hearing. After Chapman tests George by sending him on a narcotics pick-up, George is accepted into the syndicate and assigned to make collections. After he delivers the taped conversations back to Grey and the others, George receives numerous warnings from them about the dangerous nature of the job, but George is determined to collect enough evidence to destroy the whole syndicate. One night, when Clara calls George to warn him that Ruth is coming to the house to attend a party, George hangs up on her before she can finish. Worried about her husband and daughter, Clara returns to Portland immediately. That night, George attends a party for Mrs. Stoneway, who has just been flown in to run a high-end escort service. Meanwhile, prostitute Iris, having felt the wire on George while dancing with him, informs Chapman of the surveillance. Chapman sends his men to search for the tapes at George’s house, where they find Ruth and kidnap her. George is then abducted and taken to the warehouse headquarters. Meanwhile, Grey and the others play the tapes for a large group of union labor men who decide to raid the warehouse that night. Back at the warehouse, George refuses to give Chapman information despite repeated beatings. However, when the thugs bring Ruth before him and threaten to blind her with acid, George tells them that he has buried the tapes. As the thugs untie him, George runs with Ruth into the darkened warehouse and hides. The unionists arrive just in time to fight the thugs, enabling Ruth and George to return home to safety, with the promise of the city's peace restored.


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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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