Rock Baby-Rock It (1957)

67 mins | Musical | 1957

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HISTORY

This film's working title was Hot Rocks . The film's closing title card reads: "The Livin' End." Although the film's copyright registration lists the film as Rock, Baby, Rock It , the onscreen title is Rock Baby-Rock It . The film's advertising mattes included neither the commas, nor the hyphen. The writer-director credit appears as "Written and Directed by Murray Douglas Sporup." A modern source incorrectly credits the screenplay to two writers who wrote the similarly titled Rock, Pretty Baby (see below).
       A different modern source confirms that the film was shot in Dallas, TX and that producer J. G. Tiger was a local booking agent and promoter whose real name was Jack Goldman. The same source includes Leroy Cooper, Joe Johnson and Paul Menard among the musicians appearing in the film and states that Kay Wheeler, who performs a "rock 'n' bop" dance routine, founded the first Elvis Presley Fan Club. The actors who portrayed the mobster's henchmen were recruited from the local pro-wrestling scene.
       The film's pressbook indicates that Johnny Carroll, Don Coats and The Cell Block Seven recorded for Decca, King and Columbia Records respectively and bills Wheeler as "Queen of Rock." There are conflicting modern opinions as to who composed the songs listed above as "composers undetermined," and it has not been possible to clarify this issue: one source even suggests that Johnny Carroll composed all the songs. ... More Less

This film's working title was Hot Rocks . The film's closing title card reads: "The Livin' End." Although the film's copyright registration lists the film as Rock, Baby, Rock It , the onscreen title is Rock Baby-Rock It . The film's advertising mattes included neither the commas, nor the hyphen. The writer-director credit appears as "Written and Directed by Murray Douglas Sporup." A modern source incorrectly credits the screenplay to two writers who wrote the similarly titled Rock, Pretty Baby (see below).
       A different modern source confirms that the film was shot in Dallas, TX and that producer J. G. Tiger was a local booking agent and promoter whose real name was Jack Goldman. The same source includes Leroy Cooper, Joe Johnson and Paul Menard among the musicians appearing in the film and states that Kay Wheeler, who performs a "rock 'n' bop" dance routine, founded the first Elvis Presley Fan Club. The actors who portrayed the mobster's henchmen were recruited from the local pro-wrestling scene.
       The film's pressbook indicates that Johnny Carroll, Don Coats and The Cell Block Seven recorded for Decca, King and Columbia Records respectively and bills Wheeler as "Queen of Rock." There are conflicting modern opinions as to who composed the songs listed above as "composers undetermined," and it has not been possible to clarify this issue: one source even suggests that Johnny Carroll composed all the songs. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Jul 1957
p. 443.
The Exhibitor
15 May 1957
p. 4329.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Chief elec
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Musical variants
VISUAL EFFECTS
PRODUCTION MISC
In charge of prod
SOURCES
SONGS
"Crazy Crazy Lovin'," "Wild Wild Women," "Rockin' Maybelle" and "Sugar Baby," words and music by Johnny Carroll
"Chicken in the Rough" and "Bop it," words and music by Rosco Gordon
"Lonesome" and "Love Me, Baby," words and music by The Belew Twins
+
SONGS
"Crazy Crazy Lovin'," "Wild Wild Women," "Rockin' Maybelle" and "Sugar Baby," words and music by Johnny Carroll
"Chicken in the Rough" and "Bop it," words and music by Rosco Gordon
"Lonesome" and "Love Me, Baby," words and music by The Belew Twins
"Eat Your Heart Out" and "Roogie Doogie," words and music by Preston Smith
"Stop the World" and "Love Never Forgets," words and music by Don Coats
"When the Saints Go Rockin' In," a rock arrangement of "When the Saints Go Marchin' In," words by Katharine E. Purvis, music by James M. Black
"Hot Rock," "Your Love Is All I Need," "Hey Juanita," "Molly, Molly" and "China Star," composers undetermined.
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DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Hot Rocks
Release Date:
1957
Premiere Information:
Dallas,TX opening: 21 March 1957
Production Date:
1956
Copyright Claimant:
Evelyn-Rock Production Co.
Copyright Date:
28 February 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8279
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18408
SYNOPSIS

After their landlord informs several teenagers, among them Judy, Larry, Bob and Marilyn, that he has found a paying tenant for the former night club they are temporarily using as a rock ’n’ roll dance venue, they realize that unless they can match the rent, they will be forced to try to find a new location. The landlord is unaware that the new tenants, “Crackers” Louis and his boss Tex, are acting on behalf of a Detroit crime syndicate that intends to run an illegal wire racket on the premises. Suspecting that Crackers's operation is illicit, the teenagers assign Judy and Larry to find incriminating evidence against him. Aware of their need to simultaneously search for a new space as well as raise money for the rent, Bob and Marilyn, come up with the novel idea of producing a benefit concert to raise funds. They visit several rock ‘n’ roll clubs in the area and invite the star performers to appear. At one club, they meet dancer Kay Lee and her attorney, Marv Newman, and after Kay agrees to appear at the concert, Marv informs them that he is aware of Crackers’ mob background and offers to talk with his friend, Senator Bennett, on the state crime commission. Meanwhile, Judy and Larry follow Crackers to a warehouse where they see him hand over several ledgers to an associate, who places them in a safe. Upon being informed of this, Marv suggests to Bennett that he have federal authorities raid the warehouse. When Tex hears a radio announcement about the upcoming benefit show, he orders Crackers and two other thugs to strong-arm the musicians into not appearing and they attack ... +


After their landlord informs several teenagers, among them Judy, Larry, Bob and Marilyn, that he has found a paying tenant for the former night club they are temporarily using as a rock ’n’ roll dance venue, they realize that unless they can match the rent, they will be forced to try to find a new location. The landlord is unaware that the new tenants, “Crackers” Louis and his boss Tex, are acting on behalf of a Detroit crime syndicate that intends to run an illegal wire racket on the premises. Suspecting that Crackers's operation is illicit, the teenagers assign Judy and Larry to find incriminating evidence against him. Aware of their need to simultaneously search for a new space as well as raise money for the rent, Bob and Marilyn, come up with the novel idea of producing a benefit concert to raise funds. They visit several rock ‘n’ roll clubs in the area and invite the star performers to appear. At one club, they meet dancer Kay Lee and her attorney, Marv Newman, and after Kay agrees to appear at the concert, Marv informs them that he is aware of Crackers’ mob background and offers to talk with his friend, Senator Bennett, on the state crime commission. Meanwhile, Judy and Larry follow Crackers to a warehouse where they see him hand over several ledgers to an associate, who places them in a safe. Upon being informed of this, Marv suggests to Bennett that he have federal authorities raid the warehouse. When Tex hears a radio announcement about the upcoming benefit show, he orders Crackers and two other thugs to strong-arm the musicians into not appearing and they attack Johnny Carroll, the star of the show. After investigating the warehouse, two plainclothes officers arrest Tex at his home, while Crackers and his pals are at the club attempting to prevent the show from taking place. A brawl between the teenagers and the thugs is broken up when the officers arrive and arrest the mobsters. The landlord, grateful for being rescued from any involvement with organized crime, agrees that the teenagers can use the club premises indefinitely.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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